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Is Everything Made of Mini Black Holes?

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posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:09 PM
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In trying to understand how gravity behaves on the quantum scale, physicists have developed a model that has an interesting implication: mini black holes could be everywhere, and all particles might be made of various forms of black holes.

Coyne and Cheng's "shielded strong gravity scenario" (SSGS), which is based on principles of thermodynamics and high-temperature physics, can describe black holes on all scales, but the differences in this approach manifest themselves only at Planckian and sub-Planckian black hole masses. At a critical point, the new model ceases to follow the unusual thermodynamics of the classical black hole, and instead produces a state that looks more and more like an object obeying traditional thermal physics. For instance, in the model, black hole evaporation is free of physical infinities, possesses traditional thermodynamic properties after an apparent phase change, and likely conserves information.

In other words, the model predicts that any states to be found at sub-Planckian masses will behave normally, and will be essentially identical to elementary particles. "Perhaps the most reassuring conclusion that we find is that the dynamical solution in either model forces the sub-Planckian states to obey the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, and thus allows them to act as normal fundamental particles," the scientists write.

When the physicists investigated what these mini black holes would act like, they found that the quantization of space at this scale would mean that mini black holes could turn up at a wide variety of energy levels, and in large numbers. They predict that these black holes might be so common that all particles could essentially be various forms of black holes at different energy levels.



www.physorg.com...

Truely amazing stuff. Ever since I first read about loop quantum gravity I always thought that there was nothing but space and twisted space. This seems to support that idea. Matter it would seem in both theories is nothing more than spacetime at different energy and density levels.

Really makes you feel that your an important part of the universe doesn't it. I mean after all you may just be nothing made of nothing. Fantastic




posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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Ah yes, Nassim Harimains' blackhole theory. I really like it because it makes it possible to eliminate the "strong" and "weak" atomic forces, rendering only 2 forces in the universe: electromagnetism and gravity

I think it makes a lot of sense.. Not to mention there is evidence that there is a black hole in the sun. Sun spots are vortexes that suck inward into the blackhole in the middle.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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Thanks for posting this. Fascinating.

It makes a certain amount of sense. If we think of gravity as a distortion of the space-time fabric itself (like a 3D "dent" in a flat 2D plane, only in higher dimensions), then a black hole could be conceved of as a very large distortion or perhaps a wormhole to another cosmos or another area of this universe. In such a case, there would be no qualitative difference between any object exhibiting gravity (i.e., every object) and a black hole, which would simply be a location/object with much-stronger-than-"normal" gravity.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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Good post!
I love quantum physics topics, as I have scratched the surface in Physical Chemistry, Quantum Mechanics semester. One important thing I learned was that the quantum world is very weird. See "Alice In Quantumland" by Robert Gilmore.
J.B.S Haldane said


I have no doubt that in reality the future will be vastly more surprising than anything I can imagine. Now my own suspicion is that the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.


Should we not fear the tinkering-with of the quantum world, when it does not lend itself well to observation? See Schrodinger et al. (the cat thought experiment to be more clear).
I have opposed CERN LHC for some time, and continue to do so, for these very reasons. The energies are present in the experiment to create the mini-black holes. Can anyone predict the outcome? Only theories reassure us. Because the true results have never been observed for this experiment on our world.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:46 PM
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Yes, mini black holes is the only explination for the product of infinity both ways (inward and out). although it has already been proven, mainstream does not like to admit it.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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Nassim's series on the "Black hole" theory is on youtube here.. He was the first to think of it.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by seattletruth
Nassim's series on the "Black hole" theory is on youtube here.. He was the first to think of it.


He won't get credit for it. He's not white enough. To brown and look at his name.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by ViperFoxBat
 


Uhm, what was that?



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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reply to post by ViperFoxBat
 


LOL He published papers on it years ago.. And he's whiter than "Chang".
Actually Nassim is as white as it gets, he just lives in Hawaii. You would be brown too after a few years spent baking.

He is also been on lecture circuits, youtube, and has a video series and foundation linked with some top level physicists. I don't think anybody can steal the credit from him...



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by 1SawSomeThings
Good post!
I love quantum physics topics, as I have scratched the surface in Physical Chemistry, Quantum Mechanics semester. One important thing I learned was that the quantum world is very weird. See "Alice In Quantumland" by Robert Gilmore.
J.B.S Haldane said


I have no doubt that in reality the future will be vastly more surprising than anything I can imagine. Now my own suspicion is that the Universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose.


Should we not fear the tinkering-with of the quantum world, when it does not lend itself well to observation? See Schrodinger et al. (the cat thought experiment to be more clear).
I have opposed CERN LHC for some time, and continue to do so, for these very reasons. The energies are present in the experiment to create the mini-black holes. Can anyone predict the outcome? Only theories reassure us. Because the true results have never been observed for this experiment on our world.


We should not fear the LHC. The things that happen inside the LHC experiments happen constantly at the edge of our atmosphere.




Mini Black Holes

The LHC, like other particle accelerators, recreates the natural phenomena of cosmic rays under controlled laboratory conditions, enabling them to be studied in more detail. Cosmic rays are particles produced in outer space, some of which are accelerated to energies far exceeding those of the LHC. The energy and the rate at which they reach the Earth’s atmosphere have been measured in experiments for some 70 years. Over the past billions of years, Nature has already generated on Earth as many collisions as about a million LHC experiments – and the planet still exists

Speculations about microscopic black holes at the LHC refer to particles produced in the collisions of pairs of protons, each of which has an energy comparable to that of a mosquito in flight.

According to the well-established properties of gravity, described by Einstein’s relativity, it is impossible for microscopic black holes to be produced at the LHC.

Strangelets

Strangelet is the term given to a hypothetical microscopic lump of ‘strange matter’ containing almost equal numbers of particles called up, down and strange quarks.

But could strangelets coalesce with ordinary matter and change it to strange matter? This question was first raised before the start up of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, RHIC, in 2000 in the United States. A study at the time showed that there was no cause for concern, and RHIC has now run for eight years, searching for strangelets without detecting any. At times, the LHC will run with beams of heavy nuclei, just as RHIC does. The LHC’s beams will have more energy than RHIC, but this makes it even less likely that strangelets could form. It is difficult for strange matter to stick together in the high temperatures produced by such colliders, rather as ice does not form in hot water.

Vacuum Bubbles

There have been speculations that the Universe is not in its most stable configuration, and that perturbations caused by the LHC could tip it into a more stable state, called a vacuum bubble, in which we could not exist. If the LHC could do this, then so could cosmic-ray collisions. Since such vacuum bubbles have not been produced anywhere in the visible Universe, they will not be made by the LHC.


public.web.cern.ch...

These facts are backed up with numbers (easy to find) and the fact taht universe is smashing things at quite higher energy levels. Don't worry to much about it.

Oh and not that its relevant to the discussion but Nassim is Swiss color is unimportant. . . .

Keep in mind that people of every color have won nobel prizes in physics as well as in ALL other scientific disciplines



[edit on 18-1-2010 by constantwonder]



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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Originally posted by seattletruth
Ah yes, Nassim Harimains' blackhole theory. I really like it because it makes it possible to eliminate the "strong" and "weak" atomic forces, rendering only 2 forces in the universe: electromagnetism and gravity


In fact there maybe only one force Electromagnetism. Because Gravity may emanate from the nearby brane according to the 11 dimensional space-time M-theory.

Peace out,

Korg.


[edit on 18-1-2010 by Korg Trinity]



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