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Twitter joke led to Terror Act arrest and airport life ban

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posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 09:37 AM
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I didn't eve know that Doncaster had an airport? Another nail in the coffin for free speech. What on earth is this world coming to ?




posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by dragonsmusic
 


Easy, but sad.

The answer is if you know what people think you can control them.

I really cannot add more to this thought. Just to say that it makes me sad it is this way.

Raist



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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Man I know this gets bandied about a lot on this site but really and truly, is anyone ever amazed at how close to the future George Orwell was with his novel 1984. I can't help feel that as technology connects us more and more, the way they become chains on our ability to be free will increase more and more until eventually thought crimes will be a reality.

Sad indeed. I get the joke was probably foolish given where he was but seriously now? A man on a watchlist with a bomb in his underwear- whos father warned intelligence he was radical- gets on a plane in suspicious circumstances but a tweet gets this man hauled in for questioning for seven hours and an enquiry as well as his job ruined?

Why can't they do their job properly when it really matters?

Cheers



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 10:46 AM
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Originally posted by thebulldog
Man I know this gets bandied about a lot on this site but really and truly, is anyone ever amazed at how close to the future George Orwell was with his novel 1984. I can't help feel that as technology connects us more and more, the way they become chains on our ability to be free will increase more and more until eventually thought crimes will be a reality.

Sad indeed. I get the joke was probably foolish given where he was but seriously now? A man on a watchlist with a bomb in his underwear- whos father warned intelligence he was radical- gets on a plane in suspicious circumstances but a tweet gets this man hauled in for questioning for seven hours and an enquiry as well as his job ruined?

Why can't they do their job properly when it really matters?

Cheers


Couldn't have put it better...



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 10:47 AM
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I'm truly sorry for mr.Chambers, that overreacting hysterical bitches are now trying to destroy him, in order to get rid of their own irrational uncontrolled fears.

Unfortunately they will fail - since they are afraid of living.

They could have asked the man if it was a joke ...
They could have checked his background ...

There is a certain amount of risk involved in living, you tend to die from it


But they would rather sell their freedom to avoid risk ... the only problem is you can't do that.



[edit on 18-1-2010 by pilot70]



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 11:23 AM
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Incidents like these are starting to surpass the common sense rule, and are now treading the dangerous ground of "principle". Rather than admit to their overreactions, or heaven forbid, not overreact in the first place, they decide to fall into the "principle of the matter" realm.

When people start going this route, it becomes scary. Rather than deal with life's real problems, they create their own in order to justify their "principles" and once that train gets going, it never stops, and they do everything they can to keep it going. We've seen these scenarios with the "War on Drugs". So thanks to legislation and traditional "principles", we have people going to jail for a long, long time from minor drug possession charges, especially marijuana, and in most cases they serve similar or longer sentences than those who rape and sodomize women and children.

Some direction these principles took us, eh? Ever have a conversation with someone that leads by this example? They tend to have a blank stare, and their demeanor is unsettling because it doesn't resemble humanity. It resembles pride in it's purest and most unrelenting form. Pride for security, pride for patriotism, it's going to get worse unless more people speak out against it.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by Raist
[If they asked you on your jobs seacrch if you have a MySpace, FaceBook, or Twitter, they might wanted to see what type of person you are based of your profile

The top examples for rejecting a candidate based on social network information:

53% of survey respondents rejected candidates because they posted provocative or inappropriate photographs or information.
44% passed on a candidate because they saw content related to the person drinking or using drugs.
35% rejected candidates because they bad-mouthed their previous employer, co-workers or clients.
29% disqualified a candidate because the person showed poor communication skills.
26% rejected a candidate because that candidate made discrimatory comments on a social networking site.
24% rejected a candidate because that person lied about his/her qualifications.
20% did not hire a candidate because social media revealed that person had shared confidential information from a previous employer.
Source



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by Jsmallz
reply to post by Raist
[If they asked you on your jobs seacrch if you have a MySpace, FaceBook, or Twitter, they might wanted to see what type of person you are based of your profile

The top examples for rejecting a candidate based on social network information:

53% of survey respondents rejected candidates because they posted provocative or inappropriate photographs or information.
44% passed on a candidate because they saw content related to the person drinking or using drugs.
35% rejected candidates because they bad-mouthed their previous employer, co-workers or clients.
29% disqualified a candidate because the person showed poor communication skills.
26% rejected a candidate because that candidate made discrimatory comments on a social networking site.
24% rejected a candidate because that person lied about his/her qualifications.
20% did not hire a candidate because social media revealed that person had shared confidential information from a previous employer.
Source



Thanks for the link... I will be making a bee line for a number of senior HR people I know to see if they are doing this in the UK.. Scary, scary.. fortunatly I am a boring person, My partner says my voice sends her to sleep
so I dread to think what effect that would have on prospective employers ;-)



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by Jsmallz
 


Well I will not say the job I was searching for at the time but I will say that I was very honest with them about my past and who I was (they asked a lot of details). All they needed to do was ask. I have no reason to lie about things I have done as I have learned from each experience I have. I may regret some of those things but I always learned from them.

They seemed disappointed I did not have one. Yet they failed to hire me based on something from my past. No matter though, as I am a different person than I was when I was younger.

Raist



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 02:48 PM
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I think this person was completely idiotic for posting what he did knowing full well the times we live in. Personally, I'm glad that someone was vigilant enough to report his a$$ and I'm glad he got arrested and banned for life.

You jokers out there saying that people are taking this too seriously are also the ones crowing the loudest yelling that security doesn't do it's job when an actual terror suspect is caught or an attack does happen.

Face it - you cannot be stupid or foolish in the world's most secure areas. If you are, there's a price to pay.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by sos37
 


Oh, you mean like preventing someone on a watch list, who's relatives petition the authorities for intervention, whom passes through multiple levels of security and countries with plastic explosives in his underwear... You mean that vigilance?

Yeah, right. So apparently something like that goes unnoticed, but a joke on twitter gets all the attention in the world. Do you see where this is going? If you don't, then you need to think on it.



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by SyphonX
reply to post by sos37
 


Oh, you mean like preventing someone on a watch list, who's relatives petition the authorities for intervention, whom passes through multiple levels of security and countries with plastic explosives in his underwear... You mean that vigilance?

Yeah, right. So apparently something like that goes unnoticed, but a joke on twitter gets all the attention in the world. Do you see where this is going? If you don't, then you need to think on it.


That's a great point - but it really has nothing to do with the thread at hand.

Questions on point:

* Did this kid do something stupid?
* Did he deserve to be punished?
* Was his punishment excessive?



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by sos37
I think this person was completely idiotic for posting what he did knowing full well the times we live in. Personally, I'm glad that someone was vigilant enough to report his a$$ and I'm glad he got arrested and banned for life.


You are happy someone got banned for nothing other than humor ? is humor now a crime ... relax man !



You jokers out there saying that people are taking this too seriously are also the ones crowing the loudest yelling that security doesn't do it's job when an actual terror suspect is caught or an attack does happen.


You jokers getting all panic'ed, are the ones giving the terrorists a motive ... your hysteria is their only weapon ... they can not do any serious damage to the USA or any other western country.

For instance 9/11 was nothing at all, a minor blip and never really hurt the USA ... 3000 people out of business, two fallen houses can not really put the USA out of business.

I live in a 5 million people country ... if you scale things properly it would amount to 45 people killed in my country ...
wow sh*t !!! we would really be out of business ... yelp ... arghghgh !!!


What hurt the USA and the west in general was hysteria ... those boys got to be famous inspirators for generations of terrorists, due to hysteria and you guys are closing your own countries, making insane laws, banning relaxed people from travelling for life, hurting millions of common citicens rights .. etc. etc.

Had you taken it for what it was and made a little notice somewhere and got on with life, nobody would remember today, and achmed would be guarding his fathers sheep somewhere in the middle east.



Face it - you cannot be stupid or foolish in the world's most secure areas. If you are, there's a price to pay.


Face it - your attitude is the terrorist's nuclear bomb


[edit on 19-1-2010 by pilot70]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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I find it amazing that people flock to these sites like My Space, Facebook and Twitter and voluntarily give TPTB a view into their lives. These sites were created by them to monitor us.

I don't know what people are thinking when they post jokes about blowing up airports on government monitored social web sites and are surprised when that knock on the front door comes.




[edit on 1/19/2010 by Erasurehead]



posted on Jan, 19 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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Originally posted by Raist
Scary how the world wants to view our every thought.

Raist


Maybe its so they dont have to have any thoughts of their own.

It seems to me a lot of our technology, the constant texting, phoning, twittering, etc., all acts to distract people from deep self reflection, or really, any deep alone thinking.

I wonder how much totally "alone" time (no communication with other humans at all, or listening to other humans via TV or music) the average human being has in a day. I will bet it isnt much.



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