It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Do Not Use Google Sky!

page: 1
3

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:30 PM
link   
It BUGS me when people use Google Sky and go "Oh, here's Nibiru", or "Oh, here's an Alien Fleet"

Google Sky is NOT live! It's old data. It's also not clear at all for the most part.

Stop using it to show us "Alien Fleets" and pick out "Nibiru" !

Small telescopes are cheap, go pick one up and look at the sky for yourself.




posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:32 PM
link   
Yeah small scopes are cheap but if you wanted to see something like what is in speculation then the average astronomer won't be able to afford one



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by Lil Drummerboy
Yeah small scopes are cheap but if you wanted to see something like what is in speculation then the average astronomer won't be able to afford one


Nope. I have seen the rings of saturn with a $30 telescope from Target. I have seen the bands on Jupiter, nebulosity in M42(Orion), and Mars.

All you have to do is find a dark spot (harder than getting the scope :lol
, prepare your eyes, and learn how to use the scope.

[edit on 17-1-2010 by Tom_Proctor]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:43 PM
link   
reply to post by Tom_Proctor
 


Did you say "The rings on Mars"?

I hope you meant "The rings on Saturn".

Unless I missed something all of these years.


But yeah, as far as the OP is concerned, I'm with ya.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:46 PM
link   
Um... Mars doesn't have rings, so whatever you were seeing was an artifact. Jupiter has faint rings, but its unlikely you'd be able to see them with a thirty dollar telescope.

edit: My mistake, I see you said the bands on Jupiter, not the rings. please disregard that bit.

[edit on 1/17/2010 by LiquidLight]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:46 PM
link   
reply to post by Tom_Proctor
 


this seems to be more apt for a reply to someone else's google sky thread rather than a thread by itself...

you needed an entire extra thread for this discussion?....


...really?

-

[edit on 17-1-2010 by prevenge]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 08:51 PM
link   
There is a prgm that I have been using for many yrs way before google sky came out..

Its called Stellerium I have been using it since 04 or something..

Its a decent Open Source prgm that allows you to see all kind of things.. Check it out you might like it.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 10:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by impaired
reply to post by Tom_Proctor
 


Did you say "The rings on Mars"?

I hope you meant "The rings on Saturn".

Unless I missed something all of these years.


But yeah, as far as the OP is concerned, I'm with ya.


Hehe yes, I was thinking about Mars and made a mistake and put mars instead of Saturn


I have been an amateur astrophotographer and astronomer for over 6 years now.

To others:

This is a cause for a thread. I see SO MANY people using google sky to show us nibiru. These could be camera or post processing artifacts. All of the weird stuff you see is likely created after the image is taken, or by the camera.

I laugh at everyone who believes the stuff that comes out of Google Sky and think they found Nibiru or an Alien Fleet.

Sure it's great for general astronomy, but don't take weird things you find seriously. Most of the sky up to a certain magnitude has been cataloged and Google Sky doesn't even come close to the magnitude that extreme cataloging goes to.

I have tried stellarium and it's my main star map program. It's great.



[edit on 17-1-2010 by Tom_Proctor]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 10:43 PM
link   
It's amazing what you can actually see with a fairly inexpensive telescope. Even with my 80$ pair of binoculars mounted on an inexpenive camera tripod, I have been able to see the rings of Saturn, the moons of Jupiter, the galaxy M51 and all kinds of other great stuff in the nights sky...

The key is LIGHT POLLUTION and getting away from large urban areas where so much light is allowed to pollute the night sky. Toronto is really quite bad for this and I have to drive about 40 miles north of here just to get a semi decent night sky to look at. No matter how large your telescope, light pollution will always interfere with the viewing of low magnitude celestial bodies.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 10:49 PM
link   
I guess next you will try to tel me that Google Earth is not going to help me research a previously undiscovered ancient city found on Caribbean sea floor

That's just absurd to think this. Everything on the Internet is real. I know it is because I read it there !!!




top topics



 
3

log in

join