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Personal trial of colloidal silver effectiveness on a skin condition

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posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 03:48 AM
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I was looking at Colloidal Silver too to cure my fungal infection in one toenail. I've tried a lot of things including diet, to no benefit. However, I'm not too keen on doing the colloidal silver from a kit made by myself as I have read that the smaller and better dispersion of nano-sized particles of silver in purified water solution was superior. I'm about to call "Natural Immunogenics" or "Super Natural Silver" unless somebody has experience and can share a better place to order the finer particle silver.

Glad someone started this topic because I was always curious about this.




posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by VneZonyDostupa
reply to post by seattletruth
 


I understand you're just "sharing an experience". Here's the rub, though. When you post on here that colloidal silver "cured your psoriasis", you'll be basing that on false information. Then, others will take that false information and use it on their own for psoriasis, or other conditions, and so on and so on, potentially harming many people by causing them to delay ACTUAL treatment.

It's the same reason I don't give medical treatment advice on ehre. It's wholly irresponsible. The most I do it point out unrealistic or improper treatment.


As someone who suffers from Dyshidrotic eczema, I will try anything that might get rid of the extremely intense itching and burning. I've already tried a multitude of different things, but nothing seems to work, including the steroids that I was prescribed. The steroids do help at first, but then a week or so later, the outbreak returns with a vengeance and it's twice as bad.

My outbreaks first started on my feet. Then a few years later, it spread to my hands. So when my feet break out, my hands do also. Luckily I have been in remission this past year ( YEAH!!!!!!), but when (and if)it does come back, I'll start my quest again to find something that will stop it.

I've read that people have use diluted MMS in a spray bottle on psoriasis and DE, and that is going to be first in my arsenal to try. Dr.'s only prescribe strong steroids for my condition, which don't work, and are not good to take long term. If you had a condition like this, you'd try anything you could.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 04:16 PM
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You'll find that Doctors & pharmaceutical companies have no reason to push a cure that they don't benefit from, and maybe lose sales from. I myself need to have real results from supplements or natural cures to embrace them. I have had some successes that worked better than the prescriptions I was given and with less side effects. But, I am catious of blanket statements of cure-alls. That said, you have nothing to lose if you try a natural cure and maybe everything to gain.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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Originally posted by thepixelpusher
You'll find that Doctors & pharmaceutical companies have no reason to push a cure that they don't benefit from, and maybe lose sales from. I myself need to have real results from supplements or natural cures to embrace them. I have had some successes that worked better than the prescriptions I was given and with less side effects. But, I am catious of blanket statements of cure-alls. That said, you have nothing to lose if you try a natural cure and maybe everything to gain.


Holy sweeping generalizations, Batman! Doctors have no reason to push a "cure" they don't benefit from? Really? You realize that the main source of cashflow for physicians is procedures, right? We get little to no money when we prescribe you antibiotics, home rest, anything of the sort. That's why practices with high procedure rates (dermatology, surgery, orthopaedics) make HUGE salaries, while internists (me) and family practice tend to be substantially lower.

In my personal experience, both in my own patient-care and observing colleagues, most doctors are motivated by making patients better. Money is nice, and we certainly have massive student loans to repay, but only a small percent of the physician population would put monetary gain above adequate patient care, especially when negligent treatment of a patient would cause revokation of your license and jail time.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 04:24 PM
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reply to post by virraszto
 


Part of the reason for your recurrent outbreaks is that eczema is thought to be a genetic autoimmunity. Nothing short of genetic therapy (still years away) will cure this permanently. I'm sure there are a plethora of therapies that will relieve it for a time, both prescription and homeopathic, but a will always return. All I ask is that people have the moral fortitude to not toss around baseless "medical advice" when their only frame of reference is one experience that wasn't controlled in any way. One person may think colloidal silver cured their eczems, when in fact their outbreak was simply having a cyclical fading, typical of eczema.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


You are right, it may never go away permanently, but for the time being, trying to find something that will ease the suffering is an ongoing battle. I've been wondering if I put lidocane, or a numbing agent on it, if that would help. I have already tried things with lidocane in them, but I don't think it's strong enough to have much affect. If it were numb, then I wouldn't scratch the itch, making it spread, and making it worse.

Also, what works for one, may not work for another.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 04:46 PM
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reply to post by virraszto
 


Lidocaine would work, but you need to be careful. First of all, it's very short term relief, unless it is mixed with epinephrine. Secondly, long term use of lidocaine, and especially lido+epi, can occasionally lead to nerve impairment. This is doubly risky if you haven't been trained on how to do nerve blocks for specific parts of the body. It won't do you much good trying to numb the itching on your foot if you hit the medial dorsal nerve and numb up 3/4 of your foot



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 04:48 PM
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There's always an axe.
Don't think I haven't thought of chopping my foot off to relieve the itch.


I will look into the lidocaine. It's not something I would use regularly. If I can nip the itch in the bud, then it doesn't get as bad.

[edit on 17-1-2010 by virraszto]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by thepixelpusher
 


I use wateroz it works well for me but it is very hard to get any thing under the nails to get to that fungus. www.wateroz.com...



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:09 PM
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I've already gone through this myself, battling a mysterious skin rash that I never did figure out exactly what it was. At first I thought it was excema or psoriasis, then after some research, thought maybe it was 'ringworm'. Which BTW, has nothing to do with worms. It's a skin fungus that you can pick up just about anywhere, especially public places.

At any rate. I'm big into alternative and natural medicine and tried all kinds of different creams and also colloidal silver. After much research, I found that lots of people were reporting amazing results with Apple Cider Vinegar for a variety of skin conditions.

I gave it a try and found that it was the single most effective skin remedy I had ever tried. (I've tried a ton of them). Somehow it has the effect of drying up the rash without over drying it. I believe this is because it is such a good PH regulator. It brings your skin PH into the perfect zone, so it never over drys, but it does dry up and help remove 'blemished' skin. ACV also is a natural antibiotic antifungal, so it kills whatever is causing the rash on the skin.

I would highly recommend that you try Apple Cider Vinegar. Not only for this, but just about any other skin condition. It really works extremely well. Make sure you get the good stuff at a health food store or health section of some grocery stores. The best and most recognized brand is 'Braggs'. This is the one I use and the one I recommend and is widely available in every health food store I've ever checked in. Depending on how sensitive your skin is, some need to dilute the ACV with water. Others can use it full strength. Just depends on you and where on your body you're using it. I'd suggest starting with a test of a half water half ACV mix, for a skin test. Then work up or down in strength from there.

BTW, for me, ACV has been much more effective than colloidal silver. With the CS, it was hard to tell when and if it was doing much. With ACV, there was no doubt as I saw great results immediately.

[edit on 17-1-2010 by shasta9600]

[edit on 17-1-2010 by shasta9600]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by virraszto
There's always an axe.
Don't think I haven't thought of chopping my foot off to relieve the itch.


I will look into the lidocaine. It's not something I would use regularly. If I can nip the itch in the bud, then it doesn't get as bad.

[edit on 17-1-2010 by virraszto]


Oh, it'll definitely stop the itch, haha. Like I said, though, be careful with nerve blocks. If you go too deep, especially in the foot, you could lesion a major motor nerve. No fun.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:11 PM
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I think I had the same condition as you have. The way I got rid of it (I think) Is by eating healthy and working out. taking regular showers and sauna.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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I'll also add that for Colloidal Silver to really work, there is a wide variety of opinions on how exactly it has to be generated and how many parts per million is most effective. This can get very confusing and costly in trying to figure out what's best among the different brands and generators.

You won't have this issue with Apple Cider Vinegar. It's inexpensive and as long as you're using a top brand (Braggs), there's no doubt in how potent it is.

[edit on 17-1-2010 by shasta9600]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by VneZonyDostupa
 


I'm talking about a lidocaine creme. My daughter was given some lidocaine creme ( I assume it was lidocaine) to put on her skin before a mole removal. I think it can be bought online. I'm not talking about a shot. I have to give my dog two shots a day, and that's bad enough, I couldn't give myself one.


I've tried apple cider vinegar. I've tried regular vinegar, peroxide, bleach, butters, creams, oils, hot water, ice cold water, vaseline, honey, epsom salts, sea salt, aloe vera, burn creme, urine ( my own!) etc. etc, the list goes on and on and on. I've even taped my feet up so I can't scratch them. That is nothing short of torturous.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by virraszto
 


Try a probiotic like acidophilus just about every one at some point in there lives have been put on an antibiotic. Antibiotics kill bacteria understand that you should have 3 to 5 lbs of good bacteria living in your gut it is part of your immune system. When the antibiotic kills that good bacteria yeast takes over and that is when all kinds of problems start to happen including skin problems. And of course the doctors start cashing in.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by virraszto
 


Ah, okay. I guess I'm just so used to lidocine injections from doing suturing all day that I didn't even consider the topical form, haha.

Good luck with that, I hope you get the results you're looking for!



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:32 PM
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reply to post by shasta9600
 

Apple cider vinegar is good stuff its one of the best and cheapest things you can do for your body. But it taste like crapp I take bragg to but for those that cant handle the taste you can get it in pill form.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:35 PM
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Originally posted by VneZonyDostupa
I don't think it is wise to outline full qualifications in a public forum.



And I don't think it is wise to use your "qualifications" to push false and illogical information.


Protocol slaves like you do it all the time.
The title 'dcotor' is only an honorary one anyway.
Very few Medicos are real doctors ie PhD's.
The majority of medical doctors only have a degrees in medicine/surgery...
...formally learn very little about Pharma...
...and are slaves to Pharma who write all the protocols anyway.



[edit on 17/1/10 by troubleshooter]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by troubleshooter

Originally posted by VneZonyDostupa
I don't think it is wise to outline full qualifications in a public forum.



And I don't think it is wise to use your "qualifications" to push false and illogical information.


Protocol slaves like you do it all the time.
The title 'dcotor' is only an honorary one anyway.
Very few Medicos are real doctors ie PhD's.
The majority of medical doctors only have a degrees in medicine/surgery...
...formally learn very little about Pharma...
...and are slaves to Pharma who write all the protocols anyway.



[edit on 17/1/10 by troubleshooter]


We are all required to take the entirety of Pharmacy school curricula in 8 months. Our standardized board/certification exams are about 50% pharmacological kinetics and interaction questions. Additionally, the average student entering medical school now has a masters, typically in public health or a biological science.

You need to read up on what medical doctors actually are and do, it seems. Fifty years ago, your assumptions would have probably been right. However, the medical education system was revamped in the 1960s. Most doctors now are very knowledgable on drugs and alternative therapies, both prescription and homeopathic. We're required to offer alternative treatments with any plan we prescribe a patient, and are also required to divulge any conflicts of interest (paid to speak for a company, sponsored by a company, etc.) in our physician profiles every year, which are publically available on the internet in most instances. Hiding a conflict of interest can result is loss of your license and being, basically, unhireable.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 05:45 PM
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Originally posted by wizardwars
reply to post by shasta9600
 

Apple cider vinegar is good stuff its one of the best and cheapest things you can do for your body. But it taste like crapp I take bragg to but for those that cant handle the taste you can get it in pill form.


Internally, you can mix it with a good apple juice and it's not bad at all. With water alone, it can tough to swallow at first, but not that bad after a while.

I forgot to clarify that my post and experience was with using it externally, directly on the problem area. I would take a paper towel, fold it up, and then soak the rash with the ACV. For smaller areas you can use cotton pads or Q-tips for small blemishes. After the great effeciveness I found with it for the bad rash, I now use it for every skin blemish that comes up. It works great for all of them.



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