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Does Water Have Memory?

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posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:10 PM
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Water's Memory

"All life processes are directly or indirectly connected with water, therefore it entitles water to have a very high priority and positioning in the environmental situation," according to Dr. Ludwig.

Question: "Dr. Ludwig, you have formulated the thesis stating that water has a memory like an elephant. What exactly does this statement refer to?"

Dr. Ludwig: "This statement refers to the following: water has the ability to transfer information, once it has obtained it, to other systems such as living organisms. Before we illuminate this in detail, we will recall some of the basic characteristics of water.

We know our organism is made of 75% water. We could survive several weeks without food, but without water, we can only survive a few days.

When we drink poisonously charged water we are thereby creating, as the years goes by, the basis of dis~eases and/or a weak health condition in general. Around the world, water is often chemically and mechanically "purified" with the intention of ridding the water of as many poisonous substances as possible. This is not even in its own limited way sufficient. If we for instance take a look at the limits for nitrate, they might be pretty harmless to adults, while to infants they can be very dangerous. There is no political or scientific agreement upon the chemical quality of fresh water as it ought to be!"

More: www.alivewater.net...
edit on 3/4/2011 by semperfortis because: To correct Grammer




posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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This might be of some interest to you.........



Interesting stuff.



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:15 PM
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Originally posted by infobrazil
More: www.alivewater.net...


a website where you can buy a few feet of 1/2" copper pipe for $798....
www.alivewater.net...



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:22 PM
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reply to post by dereks
 


That is freaking ridiculous, .... 800 bucks for a few feet of twisted copper pipe ??? the only thing thats different is that its twisted !!!

do they really think running water through these will have some sort of affect ??

It pisses me off how some people try to make a buck off of peoples misguided notions, this is modern day snake oil.

www.cyber-nook.com...


[edit on 14-1-2010 by IntastellaBurst]



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:26 PM
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Does water has memory? Does this thread 'has' proper grammar? haha


And I agree that the twisted copper thing is just ridiculous.

[edit on 14-1-2010 by born2BWild]



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:32 PM
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NO ... NO ... NO !!!!!!!!
Water does NOT and CANNOT have a so-called "memory".
Wake up to yourselves all those that believe otherwise.

Water is one of the most basic and simplest molecules there is ... it's made up of 2 atoms of hydrogen and 1 atom of oxygen.

It has NO capability for information processing which is what a "memory" function would require. There is NO means or method for a water molecule to store information ... or to retrieve information ... or to transfer information.

It's just 3 atoms linked together ... NOTHING MORE !!!!



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


Although the premise of this thread is bogus, your post is misleading.

Molecular memory storage is in developement as we speak, utilising quantum mechanics and the "spin" properties of molecules and their individual atoms.

Other molecules are used in standard storage by altering their magnetic alignment, this is how hard drives, tapes and VHS works.

I suggest you read up on it, it is interesting and will revolutionise data storage in coming years.

EDIT: Smaller particles do have the capabilty to store and transfer information even today, how do you think you are posting on this forum?



[edit on 14/1/10 by stumason]



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 08:19 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by tauristercus
 


Although the premise of this thread is bogus, your post is misleading.

Molecular memory storage is in developement as we speak, utilising quantum mechanics and the "spin" properties of molecules and their individual atoms.

Other molecules are used in standard storage by altering their magnetic alignment, this is how hard drives, tapes and VHS works.

I suggest you read up on it, it is interesting and will revolutionise data storage in coming years.

EDIT: Smaller particles do have the capabilty to store and transfer information even today, how do you think you are posting on this forum?



[edit on 14/1/10 by stumason]

Sorry, but my post is in no way misleading.

Having said that, I do agree with you that molecular "memory" storage does hold an enormous amount of promise and will revolutionize electronics and data storage/retrieval.

But where you're missing the entire point is that no matter what method is used to "impress" data onto a molecule e.g. modifiying the spin property, we are only talking about storing a single data bit - equivalent to a "0" or "1".

Even if it proves possible for a water molecule to store a single data bit, so what ? how does this translate into a useable data storage medium as this (and similar posts) are suggesting ?What mechanism within the millions of water molecules in say, a drop of water, would be able to assign a digital bit value to a given water molecule ? What mechanism within the water drop would "read back" the stored data bit ?
How would the millions of water molecules with associated data bits be "read" (sequentially or randomly) to extract all the necessary data bits to recreate the original information content ?
How would multiple "memories" be stored amongst millions of water molecules and retain their "uniquness" ? After all, water molecules are NOT stationary and are in a constant state of motion (look up Brownian motion) ... at one instance of time, 2 water molecules could be next to each other then a short time later could be millions of molecules apart.
How would any individual "memory" comprising of 100's or millions of water molecules retain its integrity and furthermore, be correctly located and accessed in the correct recall sequence if the individual water molecules have moved randomly apart ?

Basically ... you need 3 processes.
1. An ability to store the original info
2. An ability to keep track of the stored info
3. An ability to access the stored info in the CORRECT sequence to reproduce the ORIGINAL info.

Water molecules DO NOT have the above ability.

Simple physics and chemistry knowledge are more than sufficient to show the ridiculousness of such claims.

Just had another thought:

What about the constant evaporation/loss of water molecules on the surface ? Wouldn't that immediately result in data storage degradation if you're continuously losing water molecules that might be storing info for a particular "memory" ?

[edit on 14/1/10 by tauristercus]



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


I agree, hence why I said the premise of the thread was bogus. I was just clarifying that your assertion that molecules have no ability to hold or convey information is wrong.

This has nothing to do with the molecules ability to "process" said information, because you obviously need another process involving other mechanics to do so, just that it can carry it.

[edit on 14/1/10 by stumason]



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 08:27 PM
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Originally posted by stumason
reply to post by tauristercus
 


I agree, hence why I said the premise of the thread was bogus. I was just clarifying that your assertion that molecules have no ability to hold or convey information is wrong.

This has nothing to do with the molecules ability to "process" said information, because you obviously need another process involving other mechanics to do so, just that it can carry it.

[edit on 14/1/10 by stumason]


Ok, good to see that we agree on the important points ....

this threads topic is bogus ...
that molecules CAN be used for data storage but ONLY if the necessary infrastructure is available to store, maintain and recall said stored info.

Just sad to see so many people falling for this sort of pseudo-scientific mumbo jumbo



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 08:50 PM
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Mods forgive me the one liner here but to me simply water IS memory.



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 09:32 PM
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This is amazing! I don't care what those guys say, this is a great find!

LifENcircleS



posted on Jan, 15 2010 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by tauristercus
 


If water is no more than 3 atoms linked together and cannot have memory and the human body is nothing more than atoms linked together (70% water) how do you explain your consciousness? Your memory?



posted on Jan, 15 2010 @ 12:31 PM
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Just watch this folks

PART 1/8


The video speeds up to the point in part 2 or 3

[edit on 15-1-2010 by Scarcer]

[edit on 15-1-2010 by Scarcer]



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by Scarcer
 


Very interesting studies going on in these fields. Water particles can apparently be rearranged by thought or emotions projected onto them.

This is a 2 hour film with a few minutes at around 0:57:00 dealing with water not so much having memory but being affected by human thought. Anyway, it's all related. We are powerful beings and we need to realize what we really are.

The film also touches on a lot of other interesting topics ATS will surely find interesting, especially linking of quantum mechanics, entanglement, brain function, psychology, etc.




posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 04:40 AM
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Originally posted by Topato
This is a 2 hour film with a few minutes at around 0:57:00 dealing with water not so much having memory but being affected by human thought.


Except that film "David Albert, a physicist who appears in the film, has accused the filmmakers of selectively editing his interview to make it appear that he endorses the film's thesis that quantum mechanics is linked with consciousness. He says he is "profoundly unsympathetic to attempts at linking quantum mechanics with consciousness."[19]"

"Bernie Hobbs, a science writer with ABC Science Online, explains why the movie is wrong about quantum physics and reality; "The observer effect of quantum physics isn't about people or reality. It comes from the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, and it's about the limitations of trying to measure the position and momentum of subatomic particles... this only applies to sub-atomic particles—a rock doesn't need you to bump into it to exist. It's there. The sub-atomic particles that make up the atoms that make up the rock are there too." Hobbs also discusses Hagelin's experiment with Transcendental Meditation and the Washington DC rate of violent crime, saying that "the number of murders actually went up." Hobbs also disputed the film's use of the ten percent myth.[18]"

"Skeptics such as James Randi described the film as "a fantasy docudrama" and "[a] rampant example of abuse by charlatans and cults."[21] The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry dismisses it as "a hodgepodge of all kinds of crackpot nonsense," where "science [is] distorted and sensationalized."[22] A BBC reviewer described it as "a documentary aimed at the totally gullible."[23]"
en.wikipedia.org...!%3F



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 04:41 AM
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storing information in a drop of water is some secret secret agent #....

i would like it



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 04:58 AM
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Everything has memory. How do hydrogen molecules know how to be, well hydrogen molecules or oxygen molecules etc. They are imprinted with some some form of memory we do not fully understand. As molecules come together to form larger organisms they most likely increase thier capacity for memory.

Everything is vibrating so you can look at from a sound perspective. Everything has its own note so to speak as atoms cells and molecules come together they combine thier notes to make a unique harmony or cord. Certain vibrations cause certain reactions so this in a sense is a type of memory. If I introduce a set of molecules into my body my body reacts to thier note or vibration or chord in a certain way. So everything you eat is a piece if information encoded with some information or memory from its vibration or energy signature telling your body and your body reacts to that information.

So yes water has memory.
edit on 4-3-2011 by hawkiye because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 05:13 AM
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Originally posted by hawkiye
Everything has memory. How do hydrogen molecules know how to be, well hydrogen molecules or oxygen molecules etc. They are imprinted with some some form of memory we do not fully understand. As molecules come together to form larger organisms they most likely increase thier capacity for memory.

Everything is vibrating so you can look at from a sound perspective. Everything has its own note so to speak as atoms cells and molecules come together they combine thier notes to make a unique harmony or cord. Certain vibrations cause certain reactions so this in a sense is a type of memory. If I introduce a set of molecules into my body my body reacts to thier note or vibration or chord in a certain way. So everything you eat is a piece if information encoded with some information or memory from its vibration or energy signature telling your body and your body reacts to that information.

So yes water has memory.
edit on 4-3-2011 by hawkiye because: (no reason given)


I don't know... take a medieval water wheel that grinds grain for instance.

You could make the argument that the water wheel and grinder have a memory. It "knows" how to turn, transfer power to the grinder, and the grinding stone "knows" how to move around and grind the grain.

But the machine doesn't know anything. The wheel turns because of gravity. The grinder turns because power is transferred through gears. Just because something does something, on the molecular scale like atoms bonding to each other, doesn't mean it has a memory. It is a chain of events based on input. Just like a water wheel, or an air turbine power generator. Something doesn't have to know how to do something in order to do it. If you throw a rock the rock doesn't "know" how to sail through the air. It sails through the air because a force (you throwing it) acted upon the rock, and it will keep sailing until other forces stop it (air resistance, gravity)

As far as the "what the bleep do we know" movie, I can't trust ANYTHING said in there, after they claim people couldn't see Columbus's ships because they have never seen anything like that before. That's complete utter BS, when a baby is born it's never seen anything before, so by that logic none of us should be able to see anything at all. They loose 100% of their credibility.



posted on Mar, 4 2011 @ 07:41 AM
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Two examples of non molecular nano particle manipulation of water.


The manufacture of homeopathic medicines involves two processes – dilution and ‘succussion’ (a specific form of vigorous shaking). The medicinal substance is dissolved in water and alcohol, then diluted and succussed many times, often to the point where we would expect there to be no molecules of the original substance left. This has led sceptics to say that homeopathic medicines are ‘nothing but water’.

However the ‘memory of water’ theory suggests that water can store information about substances it has previously been in contact with.1 Bellavite P, Signorini A. The Emerging Science of Homeopathy, 2e. 2002: North Atlantic, Berkeley . It is thought that the succussion process imprints information from the original substance into the water it is dissolved in, and that this ‘message’ carried by the water allows such ultra-high dilutions (UHDs) to work.
Rey L. Thermoluminescence of ultra-high dilutions of lithium chloride and sodium chloride. Physica A, 2003; 323: 67-74.
www.homeopathy-soh.org...



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