GERMANS ENGINEERS INVENTED F-11x/V-WINGS PLANES :

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posted on Feb, 27 2003 @ 06:14 AM
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The F111 ancester, designed by GOTHA GERMANY.


www.luft46.com...




posted on Feb, 27 2003 @ 06:29 AM
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Plans on the drawing boards don't count as inventing anything.

The F-111 was the first plane to have the swing wing design and the F-14 shortly after.

The luft46 site is excellent for interpreting how the planes would have looked if they had been produced.

Check out the Sanger Amerika project, the first concept of a sub orbital intercontinental bomber.

xmb.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Mar, 2 2003 @ 07:20 AM
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Compare with this UAV, It's the same design...
F-14 is a Variable Architecture Plane
F-111 and F-117 are delta wings planes



[Edited on 2-3-2003 by Nans DESMICHELS]

[Edited on 2-3-2003 by Nans DESMICHELS]



posted on Mar, 2 2003 @ 04:27 PM
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There is no doubt that the USAF and other allied forces used a lot of ideas and technology from Nazi Germany. At the end of the war, the US initiated Project Paperclip, and essentially spirited away all German scientists and information on advanced technology that they could find. Indeed, many Nazi scientists who otherwise would have stood trials for crimes against humanity lived thier lives out in American comfort as they regurgitated all useful knowledge to the USAF.



posted on Mar, 5 2003 @ 04:46 PM
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Another interestibg detail on this plan and other coming from Lockeed is that orthograph haden't been corrected and the word "CORRECTOR" seems to reveal that these plans had be made by a russian or eastern europe langage speaking engeener.

In fact 2 years ago a private company command us a study on DELTA-WINGS planes. While this study I discovered particular properties of ISOCEL TRIANGLES.

[Edited on 5-3-2003 by D.A.R.Y.L]



posted on Mar, 7 2003 @ 02:45 AM
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posted on Apr, 10 2003 @ 07:05 PM
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German airforce engineers also invented jet propulsion, the inverse V wing and early stealth technology. But the patents were stolen after the war by the United States during the "denazification" campaign.



posted on Apr, 11 2003 @ 02:16 AM
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posted on May, 16 2003 @ 12:14 AM
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Get yourself a copy of Green's "Warplanes of the Third Reich". The Horten brothers (Walter and Reimar) became interested in the flying wing in the early 1930's and built several gliders to demostrate the feasibilty of such aircraft beginning with the Horten I in 1931. The Go 229 was a wingless fighter that was near completion when the war ended. If you are thinking of variable wing geometry then that would be the Messerschmitt P.1011. The P.1011 was a research aircraft and was 80 per cent complete at the end of the war. However the P.1011 did not have an inflight capability to vary the wing geometry. It had three settings which could be selected on the ground and then flown for test results. The first aircraft to ever have a variable wing geometry was the Bell X-5 which first flew in June, 1951.

By the way German engineers did not invent the turbojet. The concept of the turbojet was first conceived by Frank Whittle of the UK. However the first turbojet aircraft to fly was the He 178 (first flight was 24 August, 1939). In the late 1930's aero engineers realized the the performace of pistion engined aircraft (such as the Me 109, the Spitfire, and the P-51) would soon reach their limitations of speed. Frank Whittle conceived of the turbojet as a possible method of increasing the horsepower/weight ratio to the degree needed to reach higher speeds. Most of the early turbojet development was based on his patents. Development of jet aircraft was pursured in several countries before and during the war. (Messerschmitt, Heinkel, and Junkers Motorenbau in Germany, Bell and Lockheed in the USA, Whittle and Gloster Aircraft in the UK, Caproni in Italy). Later in the war, the Japanese began development of jet powered aircraft based on German technical developments.



posted on May, 16 2003 @ 03:54 AM
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Mokuh., what was the early stealth reference: that's a new one to me.



posted on May, 16 2003 @ 04:08 AM
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The Go 229 would have given a smaller radar return than standard aircraft. However the Germans were not developing stealth as we know it. They did spend a lot of time developing visual camouflage schemes and had many sophisticated schemes. Unlike other air forces, there was quite a bit of difference in markings from one unit to the next. I personally know of over 75 different schemes for the Me 109. There is at least 10 different variations of the Balkekruez.






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