Martian Asparagus!

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posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:21 PM
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“Martian Asparagus”
After to have seen this image, my mind has gone to a bizzarre news that I had read some time ago. And NOW I wonder: then the Asparagus there are indeed on Mars!





Bassano, 27 January 2009 (Italy)
In the International Year of Astronomy, a Group of Owners of Restaurants in Bassano (Italy) they have received in the city of the Brenta river the NASA technicians of the American Aerospace Agency (JPL) responsible of the mission of the space probe Phoenix that in the last year, reached on the Red Planet after a travel of ten months, has confirmed that the Mars soil is adapt to the cultivation of the ASPARAGUS!




“Phoenix Mars Lander”, that in 2008 has confirmed the water presence on the ground of Mars and the similarities between the Martian soil and some terrestrial soils, those in particular apt ones to the cultivation of asparagus.
The NASA delegation in Bassano was guided by Barry Goldstein, Chief of the Phoenix project, and Michael Hecht.

The Phoenix Mission
Phoenix Mars Lander is a developed automatic probe from NASA for the exploration of the Mars planet, with the objective to study the Martian atmosphere/environment in order to verify of the possibility to support life forms microrganism and in order to assess the water presence in the atmosphere. The Phoenix probe is a program developed jointly from the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and the University of Arizona, under the direction of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA). The probe, after a travel in the space of 10 months, is landed on Mars 25 May 2008 in the northern icecap of the planet, rich ice region, where a soil champion has captured through an arm robot. The first chemical analyzes lead on the Martian soil have revealed the presence of the mineral nourishing of which the plants they have need in order to live: on Mars the conditions for the life exist!
www.scientificamerican.com...



“Not there is nothing that excludes the life”, said the NASA Scientist Samuel Kounaves explained the commenting the results of the analysis of the champion of the Martian soil captured by Phoenix probe: “That of Mars is the type of soil that could be found in your garden, rich that is of alkaline substances. A soil on which the asparagus could grow”.




President of the Consortium for Tutela of the Asparago of Bassano (Italy):
“You are interested on our Asparagus and on our alkaline soil and We would be happy that on Mars our asparagus could grow, because we are sure that the genetic patrimony of these plants, than our families is handed on from hundreds years of generation in generation, are so valid to deserve an extraterrestrial descendancys”.

digiorgio-lescienze.blogautore.espresso.repubblica.it...

www.newsfood.com... -nasa-dellultima-missione-su-marte/


Asparagus on wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org...



Since asparagus often originates in maritime habitats, it thrives in soils that are too saline for normal weeds to grow in. Thus a little salt was traditionally used to suppress weeds in beds intended for asparagus; this has the disadvantage that the soil cannot be used for anything else. Some places are better for growing asparagus than others. The fertility of the soil is a large factor. "Crowns" are planted in winter, and the first shoots appear in spring; the first pickings or "thinnings" are known as sprue asparagus. Sprue have thin stems.[12] White asparagus, known as spargel, is cultivated by denying the plants light and increasing the amount of ultraviolet light the plants are exposed to while they are being grown. It grows directly for transplant, on a ground much drenante, without humidity. It is a plant that is adapted to various types of soil, alkaline or acids that, except to those excessive humid and where the water stagnates.




[edit on 13-1-2010 by Imagir]
 


Removed 'All Caps' from title

[edit on 13/1/10 by masqua]




posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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hehe, I remember roaming through the HiRise photos on january 10th and seeing that particular photo and wondering what the hell it was.

Some subsequent insight:



But what are those weird tendril thingies?

In the Martian winter, carbon dioxide freezes out of the air (and you thought it was cold where you are). In the summer, that CO2 sublimates; that is, turns directly from a solid to a gas. When that happens the sand gets disturbed, and falls down the slopes in little channels, which spreads out when it hits the bottom. But this disturbs the red dust, too, which flows with the sand. When it’s all done, you get those feathery tendrils. Note that at the tendril tips, you see blotches of red; that’s probably from the lighter dust billowing a bit before settling down.


Badastronomy

Although I would have probably prefered asparagus



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:28 PM
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It was my understanding that these were crystalline formations from frozen CO2 gas. Probably, not edible even if topped with Hollandaise sauce.


[edit on 13-1-2010 by whitewave]



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:29 PM
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Can you provide a NASA hosted link to that image on Mars?

Or it's co-ordinates or position please?

-m0r



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by m0r1arty
 


Hi Moriarty
Here the link.
www.telegraph.co.uk...

Of course Nasa said that those formations are an optical illusion....



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by Imagir
 

Funny how they don't cast shadows, looks more like they're leaning against something.
Kind of hard to get a grasp on the angle here.



[edit on 13-1-2010 by RuneSpider]



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by Imagir
 


Cool, thanks!

I reckon everyone is right about it being CO2 shooting out, but plants do love CO2 with their oxygen.

-m0r



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 01:08 PM
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Is there not a full blown article/thread about this on the front page of ATS already?

Interesting pictures though, a lot of people might miss out in this information since all the attention is at the original article.

ATS Thread

[edit on 13/1/2010 by the_denv]



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by Imagir
reply to post by m0r1arty
 


Hi Moriarty
Here the link.
www.telegraph.co.uk...

Of course Nasa said that those formations are an optical illusion....



This photo is an optical illusion... If you look at a large high res version of this photo it is clear that these formations are laying on the ground and not asparagus or any other form of plant or tree...

There was already a thread about this picture that basically showed that this is nothing more than an optical illusion created by dry ice... so sorry NASA is not trying to cover up trees or asparagus on Mars lol.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by m0r1arty
reply to post by Imagir
 


Cool, thanks!

I reckon everyone is right about it being CO2 shooting out, but plants do love CO2 with their oxygen.

-m0r


Right! CO2 for the Vegetals is like our Oxigen!



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 01:54 PM
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I downloaded the mega-large size of this pic and once you see it at that resolution, you realize that the forms are not vertical but actually trails of discolor that are leaching out of the dunes and running down the sides.

I'll do a crop and post it here in a few.

...



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by redoubt
 




At first, I thought this image might be a game changer... but upon closer inspection, it does look like this may be no more than something akin to a bit of natural Martian sand art.

No, I am not 100% on this but... it does bear consideration.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 02:37 PM
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The Thread is not on the image (there are other thread about it) but on the declarations of the NASA scientists who have asserted that the Martian soil has all the potentialities in order to HOST Vegetable Life ! The encounter of NASA/JPL scientists on the type of ground/soils where they are cultivated the most ancient asparagus in Italy has an enormous valence! Maybe they (NASA)already knows that Mars hosts vegetable life similar to ASPARAGUS

[edit on 13-1-2010 by Imagir]



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 04:04 PM
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Originally posted by Imagir
“Martian Asparagus”
After to have seen this image, my mind has gone to a bizzarre news that I had read some time ago. And NOW I wonder: then the Asparagus there are indeed on Mars!





Bassano, 27 January 2009 (Italy)
In the International Year of Astronomy, a Group of Owners of Restaurants in Bassano (Italy) they have received in the city of the Brenta river the NASA technicians of the American Aerospace Agency (JPL) responsible of the mission of the space probe Phoenix that in the last year, reached on the Red Planet after a travel of ten months, has confirmed that the Mars soil is adapt to the cultivation of the ASPARAGUS!




“Phoenix Mars Lander”, that in 2008 has confirmed the water presence on the ground of Mars and the similarities between the Martian soil and some terrestrial soils, those in particular apt ones to the cultivation of asparagus.
The NASA delegation in Bassano was guided by Barry Goldstein, Chief of the Phoenix project, and Michael Hecht.

The Phoenix Mission
Phoenix Mars Lander is a developed automatic probe from NASA for the exploration of the Mars planet, with the objective to study the Martian atmosphere/environment in order to verify of the possibility to support life forms microrganism and in order to assess the water presence in the atmosphere. The Phoenix probe is a program developed jointly from the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and the University of Arizona, under the direction of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA). The probe, after a travel in the space of 10 months, is landed on Mars 25 May 2008 in the northern icecap of the planet, rich ice region, where a soil champion has captured through an arm robot. The first chemical analyzes lead on the Martian soil have revealed the presence of the mineral nourishing of which the plants they have need in order to live: on Mars the conditions for the life exist!
www.scientificamerican.com...



“Not there is nothing that excludes the life”, said the NASA Scientist Samuel Kounaves explained the commenting the results of the analysis of the champion of the Martian soil captured by Phoenix probe: “That of Mars is the type of soil that could be found in your garden, rich that is of alkaline substances. A soil on which the asparagus could grow”.




President of the Consortium for Tutela of the Asparago of Bassano (Italy):
“You are interested on our Asparagus and on our alkaline soil and We would be happy that on Mars our asparagus could grow, because we are sure that the genetic patrimony of these plants, than our families is handed on from hundreds years of generation in generation, are so valid to deserve an extraterrestrial descendancys”.

digiorgio-lescienze.blogautore.espresso.repubblica.it...

www.newsfood.com... -nasa-dellultima-missione-su-marte/


Asparagus on wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org...



Since asparagus often originates in maritime habitats, it thrives in soils that are too saline for normal weeds to grow in. Thus a little salt was traditionally used to suppress weeds in beds intended for asparagus; this has the disadvantage that the soil cannot be used for anything else. Some places are better for growing asparagus than others. The fertility of the soil is a large factor. "Crowns" are planted in winter, and the first shoots appear in spring; the first pickings or "thinnings" are known as sprue asparagus. Sprue have thin stems.[12] White asparagus, known as spargel, is cultivated by denying the plants light and increasing the amount of ultraviolet light the plants are exposed to while they are being grown. It grows directly for transplant, on a ground much drenante, without humidity. It is a plant that is adapted to various types of soil, alkaline or acids that, except to those excessive humid and where the water stagnates.




[edit on 13-1-2010 by Imagir]
 


Removed 'All Caps' from title

[edit on 13/1/10 by masqua]


lol! That is exactly what I thought when I saw the photo in another thread...asparagus!

lol! Strange minds think alike.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by redoubt
reply to post by redoubt
 




At first, I thought this image might be a game changer... but upon closer inspection, it does look like this may be no more than something akin to a bit of natural Martian sand art.

No, I am not 100% on this but... it does bear consideration.


I don't think it's just in the sand....look, you can see shadows being cast from the giant asparagus, er, I mean from the giant optical illusions.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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reply to post by nikiano
 



DIRTY SECRETS: Microscopic view [color inset] of fine soil at the edge of the scoop on Phoenix Mars Lander's robotic arm (black and white), part of a sample called "Rosy Red" that was deposited into the lander's wet chemistry analyzer to check pH and mineral content.



Martian soil around NASA's Phoenix Lander is slightly alkaline and has enough different minerals that it could support Earthly plants and—more to the point—microbes beneath the Martian surface, according to the first results from the probe's wet chemistry experiment released today.




Mission scientists say the soil has a pH between 8 and 9, which places it somewhere around seawater or baking soda in alkalinity. It also contains the minerals magnesium, sodium, potassium and chloride. Further analysis is expected to reveal whether it contains other chemicals such as nitrogen and sulfates. The finding implies that life could indeed survive below the surface, where it would be protected from harmful ultraviolet rays and harsh oxidants that might accumulate on the top layer of soil.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by nikiano
I don't think it's just in the sand....look, you can see shadows being cast from the giant asparagus, er, I mean from the giant optical illusions.


It actually looks like thin spills down certain powders when I cook. Can you point out these shadows? Nothing worse than posting a picture, claiming something hard to see is in it, and not telling us where. Thanks.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 04:42 PM
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Michael Hecht, lead researcher on Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., said it would be safe, if gritty, to sprinkle a spoonful of the soil on your breakfast cereal.




"If you had it on Earth, you could grow something, no problem," MECA co-investigator Samuel Kounaves, chemist at Tufts University, said during a news conference at the University of Arizona in Tucson.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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The final statement:


Were astronauts to set up a greenhouse on Mars, Hecht said, they might be able to grow plants that thrive in basic soil, such as asparagus, green beans and turnips; not so strawberries, blueberries and other fruit, however, that require more acidic soil. (So much for a healthy breakfast.)



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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reply to post by Imagir
 


You are just ignoring the hi res close-ups aren't you? They are obviously on the ground and spread out like many little river deltas branching out until they turn to smaller fragments that look like dust from this distance. Point out the shadows if they are standing up. Anyone that has been on ATS as long as you knows all too well how easily a picture can be misrepresented and how natural rock formations can appear to be many other things. I would be willing to believe these were actually plants if someone could take one of the hi res ones and actually show this to be standing vegetation. Until then, why can it not be just what they claimed it was? It looks more like that than plants from here.

Either you want to convince or you want to push. Arguing with more speculative quotes and posts that just promote the idea more than try to prove it will show you just want to push. Helping those of us out that do not see it will show you want to convince. Your call.





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