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If experts can't ID dogs, then how can cities?

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posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 01:05 PM
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This is an article from the Denver post. I thought it was very interesting.


Shelter workers, she explained, are generally 75 percent wrong when they list or tell you the breed of a dog. The only sure-fire way of knowing, she said, is DNA testing.


So if a city bans a breed, and fines you or destroys your dog simply based on how it looks, then they really can't be sure on what they are enforcing without genetic testing.


"I started this study," Voith said, "because I am a lover of German shepherds and was appalled that every short-haired breed with brown hair was called a German shepherd. It simply isn't so."



The only sure way to know is through genetic testing.


if experts can't tell

My mom got my brother a genetic test for Christmas for his funky looking dog. We are actually taking bets on what it turns out to be. LOL




posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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This is an interesting subject. I have known dog owners (I belong to a few dog boards) who take their pure-bred dog in for breed DNA testing and it comes back a mix of two entirely different breeds! I'm not sure what kind of testing the DNA is... I mean, how does German Shepherd DNA differ from Rottweiler DNA? Is the breed imprinted in the DNA somehow? I don't know. But many of my dog friends say not to trust the DNA testing...

One of the comments in your link:



DNA testing? Uh, those "heritage" tests that came out a few years ago are mostly for "entertainment" purposes. I CERTAINLY hope they're never used to determine life and death for a dog. One of the best examples of their "accuracy" is the UKC Champion American Pit Bull Terrier whose test came back several breeds (despite this dog being a purebred champion), but mostly Border Collie.


I do know that a lot of dogs get described as pit bulls when they really aren't.

Can You Spot the Pit Bull?

[edit on 11-1-2010 by Benevolent Heretic]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 07:50 PM
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I wonder how many full blooded species of dogs there actually are? It looks to me like all the various dogs would have some other DNA other than there own floating around in there somewhere. I guess its a whole other subject but I often wonder when someone says , "these dogs are bred for this or that" exactly what that means? Did they mix and match two different dogs until they got a desired result and then start breeding those dogs exclusively?


There must be thousands of breeds.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:53 PM
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It's not important that cities identify dogs: it's only important that they pass bad, knee-jerk legislation so as to be seen to be doing something.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by Voyager1
 


Yes, they do mix breeds to create a new one. Some are far more recent then others.

And when pointed out, you can see the relationship to the parent breeds if they are still around.

For example, Dalmations are actualy not goo family dogs because of high energy. They were designed to run under carriages for long trips.

Chihuahuas, before becoming baby dolls, were small to go into holes and hunt for rats.

You have your herders, pointers, retrievers. Some herders are amazingly devout. I watched a show the other day that a breed of herder would protect sheep long after people are gone, for centuries. Doing what it does best.


There is a show on called Dogs 101 on animal planet. It is a good show. it goes over a breed, its history, and its pros and cons.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 


No lie, I actually got it. But only because I know one of the features of a pit bull is the extended hind leg stance which most people dont' recongize.

People tend to look at coats and color to identify dogs. Instead of structure, they way they carry, and their traits.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 08:05 AM
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FRom what I have read it has a 90% accuracy. The problem comes in with distant breeds from long back.

I actually think that the dna testing could come in handy for people who buy show dogs or pure breeds, because as the article indicates, you don't know what your actually getting.

How do you know that you have a certain parent if you drop a dog off to breed? Or that those puppies didn't come from a mill.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
How do you know that you have a certain parent if you drop a dog off to breed? Or that those puppies didn't come from a mill.

That's why you have to do really good research into a breeder BEFORE you get a pure bred dog - to avoid getting a dog from a puppy mill or other "bad" source, like someone who throws their dog together with the neighbor's dog without medical testing. Each breed has specific medical issues and you want to know the parent's (and pedigree's) test results. A breeder who doesn't do the medical testing is a "back yard breeder" and shouldn't be supported, IMO.

If there's one thing I could stress, it's NOT to buy from a pet store! Pet stores get their pups from puppy mills.

I researched my breeder through word of mouth. Then I talked to her and we emailed a lot, mostly with me asking questions and for proof of things, like medical information. There is so much information on the Internet now, you can find people who have bought dogs from certain breeders and ask for their experience, etc. That's what I did.

You have to know your dog's pedigree. Here are mine

Jaia:

B'asia

[edit on 12-1-2010 by Benevolent Heretic]



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 11:55 AM
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reply to post by Benevolent Heretic
 



Those are your dogs? oh they are so pretty. Just wanna take a brush to them and cover them with bows.



posted on Jan, 13 2010 @ 09:46 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox

Those are your dogs? oh they are so pretty. Just wanna take a brush to them and cover them with bows.


There is a special place in hell reserved for people who put bows, costumes, nail polish, and certain headgear on dogs.



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 06:45 AM
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reply to post by leftystrat
 


LOl touche. I stop at ballerina dreses though.



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 09:37 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
reply to post by leftystrat
 


LOl touche. I stop at ballerina dreses though.


Well, that's ok then


I admit I once put a set of reindeer antlers on my dog. He was not impressed.
It wasn't anywhere near the hilarity of simply putting a leash on my cat though. You'd have thought we were murdering him.



posted on Jan, 16 2010 @ 01:12 PM
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reply to post by leftystrat
 


LOL I have tried that once........once.

Though recently in Central Park I saw a man walking a cat and the cat was having a ball and walked well on the leash.

I know it is a completely different set of rules of traning for a cat. Though I have never tried.

I don't believe in dressing dogs up in anything but a raincoat or sweater to keep them warm.

But I was just commenting on how long and silky those coats were. So pretty.

[edit on 16-1-2010 by nixie_nox]



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 07:09 AM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
Those are your dogs? oh they are so pretty. Just wanna take a brush to them and cover them with bows.


Yes. I don't have any bows, but I'd love it if you came and brushed them!
The dust bunnies these guys create are out of control!

Another picture:

i116.photobucket.com...

[edit on 17-1-2010 by Benevolent Heretic]



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic

Another picture:

i116.photobucket.com...

[edit on 17-1-2010 by Benevolent Heretic]


Just magnificent! The long hair makes them even more stunning.

Meet Marshall:
www.lockergnome.com...



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 10:25 PM
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Originally posted by Benevolent Heretic
Can You Spot the Pit Bull?


Got it on the third try...but if I had took the time to look ayt them all it would have been the first try. Looks exactly like my pals pit, Sadie. Sweetheart of a dog...



posted on Feb, 8 2010 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by leftystrat
 

Just looking at this thread again for some info. Wonderful you rescue dogs.
I knew a woman who raised chows and now those are some coats to deal with.


Now we have a very large pit. But everyone assumed it was a pit. Now I am not so sure looking at the pics. First off she is too big. medium, 65 lbs.

Will have to get a pic.



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