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APNewsBreak: Increase in suicide rate of vets

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posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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I also wanted to add that often times soldiers say that the hardest part about being deployed is going home. I remember that when I was coming home I always thought that on the flight back there would be this miraculous change and everything would be alright. When I arrived it was great because my family was there waiting (I was one of the lucky ones) but nothing changed. The only thing that clicked was that I realized hell was only 15 hours away.

It seems so far away on the news. Most people can sit back and say that's going on inside the TV, (Zoolander style, lol) but it's not so far away.

[edit on 11-1-2010 by Styki]




posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by Styki
I also wanted to add that often times soldiers say that the hardest part about being deployed is going home. I remember that when I was coming home I always thought that on the flight back there would be this miraculous change and everything would be alright. When I arrived it was great because my family was there waiting (I was one of the lucky ones) but nothing changed. The only thing that clicked was that I realized hell was only 15 hours away.

It seems so far away on the news. Most people can sit back and say that's going on inside the TV, (Zoolander style, lol) but it's not so far away.

[edit on 11-1-2010 by Styki]


War has always been hell my friend and you never realize what a small place the world is until you really get out and about in it.

I am older, past military service age, at least to enlist anyway, but a number of my friends who have children in the services have been deployed up to 5 and 6 times in the last ten years.

They never know when they are going to get called back to go over or how long, it sure makes it hard to raise and enjoy families of their own which most of them have too.

We are really expecting too much out of many of our troops with multiple deployments and too little time between them.

I would imagine it gets to feel like playing Russian Roullette, at what point is the game really over and you are really safe.

Stay safe friend.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:58 PM
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Theres a few more news links on the subject to.

www.congress.org...


More U.S. military personnel have taken their own lives so far in 2009 than have been killed in either the Afghanistan or Iraq wars this year, according to a Congressional Quarterly compilation of the latest statistics from the armed services.



As of Tuesday, at least 334 members of the military services have committed suicide in 2009, compared with 297 killed in Afghanistan and 144 who died in Iraq, the figures show.


edgeofthewest.wordpress.com...

www.cbc.ca...


The suicide rate among Canada's soldiers doubled from 2006 to 2007, rising to a rate triple that of the general population, according to data obtained through access to information requests.


Some of those sites are not that recent but still show bad news.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 10:05 PM
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The statistics for veteran suicides is not something that goverments promote and is something that they would like to hide. One of the biggest problem for ex-servicemen in the UK is the number that become drug and alchol dependent as well as becoming homeless.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by The_Archangel
The statistics for veteran suicides is not something that goverments promote and is something that they would like to hide. One of the biggest problem for ex-servicemen in the UK is the number that become drug and alchol dependent as well as becoming homeless.


There are other down sides here in the U.S. as well, many of these returning soldiers are having a hard time adapting back to life with their families.

Spousal abuse and domestic violence on military bases and amongst military families is way up.

Post traumatic stress is really taking a huge toll in many areas.

It does not surprise British Solidiers are going through this too.

Thanks for posting.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 

hello PT,

there are no suicides in the us military, to say other wise is just leftist, socialist propagander. The us government and military love and care for all it's vet's, to say otherwise is just leftist and socialist propagander. war is honourable and provides you with useful skills to use in civilian life,to say otherwise is leftist and socialist propagander.
I'm just going down to the bottom of the garden to speak to the bush fairies I call one GH and the other GW, they'll set me straight, to say otherwise is just leftist socialist propagander.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 02:30 AM
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I am a disabled vet.
What is worse is the "care" ...

Here is a typical session I had with VA shrinks...

"Ok why you here"
".... i'm depressed, suicidal and don't understand why..."
"Well your going to be like this the rest of your life, learn to live with it..."


yeah.. I gave up going. Those are actual quotes from multiple sessions.

But they have a special suicide number for us to call. Just for us vets.

Oh, and when I've been hospitalized for suicide you think we'd get good help then right? No, just lots of meds for about a week. No talking with a shrink, no help. Just a week of boredom.

Seen the new adds the VA are putting out on TV recruiting doctors and how they get lots of time with their patients... makes me sick.

If I go to my primary care I never see my doctor, I see one of 6-10 interns he is overseeing. If I want to see a shrink I can get a half hour every 90 days if I am lucky. These are the real facts of the "care" we get. If I want to see a real doctor I go to emergency room at the VA hospital, they do have real doctors there.

Sorry for the rant.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 04:26 AM
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There is many a boy here today who looks on war as all glory, but, boys, it is all hell.

William Tecumseh Sherman, Union General in the Civil War

www.brainyquote.com...

The above quote says it all, and anyone who thinks otherwise is just plain delusion. Now, to get to the matter at hand and the large increase in suicide rates among veterans and active duty. Is it shocking, maybe for some, but it is only obvious given the style of war being fought which is a guerrilla war where sides are inherently non-existent.



The strategy and tactics of guerrilla warfare tend to focus around the use of a small, mobile force competing against a large, unwieldy one. The guerrilla focuses on organizing in small units, dependent on the support of the local population.

Tactically, the guerrilla army would avoid any confrontation with large units of enemy troops, but seek for and eliminate small groups of soldiers to minimize losses and exhaust the opposing force. Not only personnel, resources also are preferred targets. All of this is to weaken the enemy's strength; to cause them to eventually no longer be able to prosecute the war, forcing them to withdraw.


en.wikipedia.org...

For almost a decade US forces have been conducting this operation and for long revolving deployments. Men and women have their limits to a constant barrage of barbarity. In the realm of war in which they find themselves, collateral damage is almost a given in every engagement. Now, the suicide numbers should be of no surprise for anyone. However, is the response adequate to deal with it by the DOD and the VA. Time will tell, but another factor most likely contributing to such high numbers is when the service members put the uniform down and find a hopeless situation with the economy at home.

The war never ends for some and it goes in on in their heads as long as they live. My grandfather was in the Second World War. He was there at D-Day and participated in liberating France before getting injured by driving over a mine, thus, being sent home before the war ended. He would wake just about every night screaming after nightmares, my mother said they were from the war. This went on until he died. So, perhaps the war endured for him as with some of these people coming back now?

Then my brother who has been in this war for two tours is a mess. He was in Iraq during the time when the violence was really out of control. Any loud abrupt noise will get him to stop what he is doing, and jump on the ground to cover up as if he thinks their is an explosion or incoming motor rounds or whatever. My brother was a corpsman assigned to green side which is a term they use to say he was with the Marines. He had a first hand account of the savagery of the war when he treated his buddies or Iraqi civilians. He is a shell of his former self and is listless to the inner-workings of civilian life. So, I have a lot of empathy for what these active duty and veterans are going through.

However, I have some solutions to try and stem the problem. Perhaps, service members should be made to attend mandatory psychological screening upon leaving the battlefield. Maybe, have a group setting with others in the unit to talk about their problems and what they have seen or done?

These meetings would have to be moderated by trained psychiatrists.
Hopefully, in a group setting, it will allow those with demons, to open up and feel comfortable discussing the intricacies of their minds; and remove the burden from their backs. I was in the military, and there is nothing worse than standing out, and that is why I believe many are carrying their burdens with them. They feel uncomfortable showing signs of weakness to their fellow service members. Are they having mandatory group meetings after every unit returns home before they take leave or get out of the military all together? I don't think so, because the suicide rates would be lower.

However, I believe a group setting where those suffering can talk about their battle fatigue or PTSD with other like minded individuals is the best treatment for such an instance, because it fosters the same unit cohesion they learn about from boot camp and beyond. The meetings must be mandatory and everyone attends regardless of rank. The only exceptions would have to be if someone has watch or something. These mentally unfit service members need to know that they are not alone, and that, others have the same thoughts and mental issues as they.



[edit on 12-1-2010 by Jakes51]



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 04:30 AM
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f any of you are former military and give a crap about your country look at my threads.. The solders are committing suicide because of mind control techniques and abuse.. look up ramtha.. It is a evil mentality that has been turned loose on all the world since 8011 as far as i can tell mk ultra a program developed by the nazis...



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 05:27 AM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


Oh for goodness sake. I thought this was going to be an interesting thread about some rise in suidice rates among animal doctors. What an annoying thread title!



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 07:27 AM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler

Originally posted by zatara
reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


I was thinking.....suicide rate amomg vets? What can be the reason for animal docters to kill themselves ?



There beloved sheep runs off with a Ram, or threatens to tell someone just what goes on after hours?

Horse tranquilizer overdoses? Or fear that their hoof and mouth disease is getting worse?


Oddly enough, I heard that dentists have the highest rates of suicide of health care professionals. I was told that it's due to the nature of anxiety in the patients who don't enjoy the pain of the injections and drilling, etc.

Still, imagine being a vet and having to see animals dying. I had to watch my mom's dog die. I saw him fade out of consciousness at the hands of an old bastard who is too old to be working still. I told that vet the dog was likely bleeding internally, and he disagreed. The dog clearly was because I saw some blood come out of one of his bodily orifices (to be vague), and I saw his stomach sort of swell up. I told the vet this, and he said the dog would be dead already if that were the case. The dog was calm while he was in the car with me, then...at the vet's office with all the noise and stress (vacuums running and such!), he begins to hyperventilate. Now I'm not a doctor, but if you're losing blood, your brain isn't getting enough oxygen...so your breathing increases to compensate. They tried to give him oxygen but later realized nothing was coming out...fault equipment. Can you imagine these imbeciles are responsible for killing your dog and have the nerve to charge you? The doctor is the worst. He continued to consider the dog a female when we repeatedly told him it was a male, and I corrected him specifically.

Now, all that going on. Imagine seeing people crying when their pet dies. That can't be easy to deal with. I'd imagine it isn't easy to be anyone who has to deal with having the lives of others in your hands - human or otherwise.



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by pianopraze
 





I am a disabled vet.
What is worse is the "care" ...

Here is a typical session I had with VA shrinks...

"Ok why you here"
".... i'm depressed, suicidal and don't understand why..."
"Well your going to be like this the rest of your life, learn to live with it..."


yeah.. I gave up going. Those are actual quotes from multiple sessions.



This is why I posted the thread my friend, I don't believe our vets should be getting the quality care that they deserve that all people deserve.

I am no fan of the wars, but I am a big fan of people.

This is a big and growing problem that the government and the citizens both are ignoring for the most part and trying to sweep under the rug with sorry excuses when people just like you really need ALL OF OUR HELP.

Rants are welcome!

So are U2U's from anyone who just needs someone to unload on, or reach out to that will listen. You and anyone who is suffering and needs an ear or a friend feel free to send me one, whenever, as often as you like.

Hang in there, they have kept telling me all my life, that life does get better and maybe it's really just life gets easier as time goes on when it comes to dealing with heartaches, and dissapointments, and loss but it does. It's just about finding your way to those more comfortable or greener pastures.

Thanks for sharing I know that takes guts, and our soldiers don't lack courage, they just lack the support that they truly need.




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