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APNewsBreak: Increase in suicide rate of vets

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posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:08 PM
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Sobering data.

He noted that of the 30,000 suicides each year in America, about 20 percent are committed by veterans.


Even more sobering truth.

"Why do we know so much about suicides but still know so little about how to prevent them?" Shinseki said. "Simple question but we continue to be challenged."


I wish there was an answer/solution that worked for every person (vet. or not) struggling with issues that lead to suicide. It's so very difficult and tragic.




Ed: S/F




[edit on 11-1-2010 by LadySkadi]




posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


Very true LadySkadi, it's hard to believe someone would want to abandon this thing we call life.

I think a lot of it boils down to is there are just too many people that too few people truly care about to take the time to help them find things that make life worth living.

We are all probably guilty of not trying hard enough to look out and reach out more for and to those people who we know are isolated and struggling.

We can only hope that will one day change.

Thanks for posting.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:16 PM
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It'sbviously a massive issue with the deployment of 30,000 new troops to afghanistan. when your losing more to suicide than in enemy combat, something is going wrong



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:20 PM
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reply to post by woodwardjnr
 


I sincerely doubt it's about comrade deaths
U.S. soldiers represent not a large number of deaths

firstly you are being lied to
you don't know how many deaths on each sides thanks to private contracters(mercenaries).

How knows what horrors humans are being drawn into

I didnt' use the word heroes because both parties feel they are on the right side.

Who is to blame?
Govt.

Who is not waking up?
YOU!

EDIT + You = Not OP but every1

[edit on 11-1-2010 by ModernAcademia]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:28 PM
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I think there are more contributing factors to this issue than to chalk it up to just what people perceive as an "unfair" war... Think of it this way: Wars have been waged since there have been people. What are some of the primary reasons for war? Protection/self-defense is the reason most would like to put at the top of the list, but I would argue that "historically" that is a by-product of larger more "global" reasons.

War is waged for control of resources. Law of Supply and Demand. He who controls the resources, is in control. This isn't a concept applied to "recent" wars (Viet. Iraq/Afgh. etc) this is a truth applied to all wars (in some form) throughout all time...

So, the question that isn't being asked is why (if it's true) are the rates higher now, than in the past, given the assumption that the "reasons" for war, haven't really changed over time?





[edit on 11-1-2010 by LadySkadi]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


I think you missed the mark on this one.

Why are so many committing suicide?

If you go to war for something you believe , you can justify your actions.

If you go to war for reasons you know are Wrong , you can't justify

killing innocents.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by Sean48
 


I'm certainly not saying that it is not a reason, just not the only reason...
I believe there is no simple answer and to presume that it is black/white is to prevent examining the whole picture. I really do not think it is as cut/dry as you wrote. There are other factors to consider and other questions to ask. Questions that may not be thought of, if one thinks they already have the answers...
_______________________________

Regardless, suicide rates are unacceptable and need to have time, effort, attention, and resources applied to help Vets. and others who find the need for help. It cannot be ignored.






[edit on 11-1-2010 by LadySkadi]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by liquidsmoke206
 


People like this are probably the reason for the low post count. Jumping on the anti-military bandwagon and spewing crap like this, probably kept people from even opening the thread to begin with. It is a problem that the military, the VA, and the DAV all need to work on.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by Sean48
 




Why are so many committing suicide?

If you go to war for something you believe , you can justify your actions.

If you go to war for reasons you know are Wrong , you can't justify

killing innocents.


Please explain how you reached this conclusion. You seem to be indicating that killing innocents is the main reason as to why many committed suicide.

IMO, I don't see how you or I could come to a conclusion as to why these vets decided to end their life. Each one probably had a different reason and no doubt different factors that led to their death.

Instead of trying to pinpoint a cause based on some agenda, maybe we should encourage that these vets and military personnel and other people who are suicidal get all the help they can.

www.nebhands.nebraska.edu...





Flag for raising awareness

[edit on 11-1-2010 by jam321]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by jam321
 


A possible is house to house searches, kicking in the front door of a family your supposed to be there to help and seeing their terrified faces. Kind of eats away at the objective don't you think?

You take down the door because your expecting a bad guy on the otherside with an AK47 so your not looking like santa when you go in. Do that day after day and it would rub a bit don't you think. Your right I think there are many reasons, you don't have to kill an innocent for stuff like that to have a lasting affect on you if your exposed to it enough. That an living under fire constantly never knowing when an IED is going blow you apart on patrol or trying to sleep with mortars raining down on you night after night. The human body cannot sustain that level of adrenaline for such long periods without harm, physical and mental. Or if air support can read a map, the list is long and such is the nasty side of "modern" warfare.

Edit: Then you have armchair generals telling you what a hero you are when you feel very far from it. At that point you feel disconnected and alone, then it creeps up on you.

And mistakes happen, innocent people do get hurt, it's not your intention but all the good will in the world does not bring people back. That is hard to live with an when you see no real objective on the ground it eats away at you. Have you served in such a theatre of operation? I am very anti war, anti hate and anti the idiots that put people in such a horrific situation.

[edit on 11-1-2010 by Bunker or Bust]

[edit on 11-1-2010 by Bunker or Bust]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 05:56 PM
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Originally posted by RedGolem
reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


OK since I am the one who sent up the flag to get your figures right I will do the math.
twenty percent of 30,000 is 6,000.
If the figure of 26 percent increase continues from 2008 to 2010 that number will go up to 7,560.
It should be noted that this reflects all veterans, not just those who served in the gulf wars.


Thanks for doing the math, or attempting too anyway, as we don't really have compete numbers of veterans that served in the War on Terror or complete numbers of veterans over all.

Nor do the veteran numbers include the active duty military suicides which are also high and climbing.

My best guestimation works out to about 1 in 25 trying to do the math as AP presents the figures, but that is based on a guestimate of veterans overall.

Thanks for trying to help out.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 06:54 PM
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that sad thing is that the suicide rates for young people in the U.S. has always been very high.

Here is an article that gives a more accurate picture of the situation.

www.nytimes.com...


At least 128 soldiers killed themselves last year, and the Army suicide rate surpassed that for civilians for the first time since the Vietnam War, according to Army statistics. The suicide count, which includes soldiers in the Army Reserve and the National Guard, is expected to grow; 15 deaths are still being investigated, and the vast majority of them are expected to be ruled suicides, Army officials said.


You people laying out the guilt trip should be the ones who feel guilty. Why don't you all do us a favor.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 06:57 PM
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reply to post by poet1b
 


What guilt trip? Please explain in a bit more detail please.

I don't think anyone has pointed a finger and laid blame at all, quite the opposite. The concern is for those that feel they cannot go on and why that might be.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:35 PM
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Originally posted by Bunker or Bust
reply to post by poet1b
 


What guilt trip? Please explain in a bit more detail please.

I don't think anyone has pointed a finger and laid blame at all, quite the opposite. The concern is for those that feel they cannot go on and why that might be.


I for one sure feel like we owe it to our troops and our selves to find out what honestly is taking place that is causing so many veterans and soldiers involved in the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to commit suicide.

These wars might very well be about the politics of very shady things but we know that the men and women who volunteer to fight them do think they are doing the noble thing in doing it.

Many of us have different opinions regarding whether or not we as individuals think it's noble to fight in these wars but that's besides the point.

The point is here is not the politics of wars or fighting them but what the heck is happening in these wars that are making so many American soldiers and former soldiers decide to kill themselves afterwards.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:50 PM
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Since these men and women are ending their lives AFTER returning home,
it's pretty obvious that something very disturbing happened to them as
civilians that was far more traumatic than what they experienced in the
military. A more in-depth analysis is needed.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:53 PM
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Originally posted by carewemust
Since these men and women are ending their lives AFTER returning home,
it's pretty obvious that something very disturbing happened to them as
civilians that was far more traumatic than what they experienced in the
military. A more in-depth analysis is needed.


Well the reality is that the suicide rate is just as high amongst active troops and climbing too.

Is it really wise or fair to pass judgment so quickly without doing real study on the issue?



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


The story didn't describe what the suicide rate is for Active military,
so naturally I couldn't comment on that. Was it high for those in the
Vietnam era too?



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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Originally posted by carewemust
reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


The story didn't describe what the suicide rate is for Active military,
so naturally I couldn't comment on that. Was it high for those in the
Vietnam era too?


There is a link at the bottom of the Original Post to another Thread here on ATS that talks about the problem the active military is having with suicide. You might want to read it.

No suicide rates currently are higher than they have ever been amongst Veterans or Active Duty personnel.

It is actually a problem that is growing, and the bottom line is our troops need help, some how, some way, to deal with it.

Thanks.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:08 PM
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I could name a few reasons why the suicide rate is high:

First and foremost like everybody expects I am going to mention combat stress.

Second, a vary important thing to consider is that many soldiers have already accepted their own deaths. This is just one foot in the door if something else in their lives leads them down that route.

Third, leaving the military does not always leave soldiers with the best skill set to create a decent life afterward. There are programs which help soldiers re-train for a job outside the military but I am not sure how effective they are. Sure if you want to be a police man that is always open but the roads afterward a limited.

Forth, while soldiers are away life for everybody else changes. Many soldiers arrive back in the states to homes where their families have moved on. Close friends have moved away, family members may be sick or have died. Close friends relationships have changed. Soldiers put their lives on hold for a year to fight a war but the world keeps moving along. Many of you don't think about this but it's difficult for some spouses to stay faithful during deployments (that goes both ways).

That's all I can think of off the top of my head. If I think of anything else I can add it later.

edit - I am vary interesting in what you guys have to say about some of these things.

[edit on 11-1-2010 by Styki]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 09:14 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 



When I go to the VA for semi-annual checkups, the nurse always asks
if I ever feel "blue" or depressed. It's part of the Veteran's Administration
questionaire that each patient answers on every visit. If someone answers
"yes", there are mental health experts there to do follow-ups.

So it does appear that the V.A. is aware of the depression and accompanying
suicide problem. I'm not sure if there is the capability to measure their
success rate though.




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