It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Saturn energy 'could be signs of life'

page: 1
26
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 05:44 PM
link   

Saturn energy 'could be signs of life'


theaustralian.com

FOR five years, scientists had been baffled by the energy exuded by Saturn's tiny ice moon Enceladus.

Although small moons are often dormant, Enceladus was exploding with activity, but the cause remained a mystery.
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 10/1/10 by Shere Khaan]




posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 05:44 PM
link   
While the title is a little bit overly optimistic, it is still interests me greatly his activity on a distant moon. Apart from Sci-Fi I grew up being old that the solar system was a dead and lifeless place, but between Enceladus and Titan we have some very interesting places still to explore.


The results of the co-authored study, to be published online in the Nature Geoscience journal today, proved that billions of years of pent-up energy led to an episode of activity on Enceladus.

The activity led to the tiny moon, one of more than 20 orbiting Saturn, emitting unusually high temperatures and being "extremely active" with pulses of crashing ice plates and ice volcanoes.


Sarutn seems to be the place where it's at between the mysterious hexagon and enceladus!

theaustralian.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 10/1/10 by Shere Khaan]



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 06:53 PM
link   

Originally posted by Shere Khaan
between the mysterious hexagon


What do you mean by this, could you please elaborate? Thanks in advance. Great post by the way.



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 06:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by born2BWild

What do you mean by this, could you please elaborate? Thanks in advance. Great post by the way.


Sure.

The hexagon is a massive formation found at Saturn's North Pole and is discussed in these threads here.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Here is a picture of it:



[edit on 10/1/10 by Shere Khaan]



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 07:36 PM
link   

Originally posted by Shere Khaan


.... and ice volcanoes.




This really sounds like an antithesis...

Ice volcanoes, that's something I never heard before.

Guess I'll need to do my homework better...


Peace



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 07:50 PM
link   
I'm sure Arthur C. Clarke played of facts some times.....
I often read articles that sound very similar to his stories..


[edit on 10-1-2010 by iamste]



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 08:13 PM
link   
Well Saturn is a very interesting planet and so are some of what we call moons. Seems theres some interesting items parked in our solar system.



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 08:32 PM
link   
the pull of gravity on thos moons is staggering the heat sourse and activity would for sure be volcanic & tectonic movement

imagine having a play dohe ball and squashing it in the palm of your hand thats wot saturn does to these moons,

microbial life is pretty much 100% living there, if theres liqiud water there is life thats all you need, there will most likely be ice over faults & fishers and a rather warm deep ocean vent supporting life much like billions of years ago on this planet,



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 08:37 PM
link   


"The activity could be enough that it will melt the interior and possibly sustain a molten water ocean underneath, which in turn could support micro-organisms," he said."


which in turn could support shrimp, which in turn could support fish, which in turn could support man.......which could in turn support space monster...


[edit on 10-1-2010 by MR BOB]



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 08:42 PM
link   

Originally posted by iamste
I'm sure Arthur C. Clarke played of facts some times.....
I often read articles that sound very similar to his stories..


[edit on 10-1-2010 by iamste]


Well Arthur was a space-man to the hilt, not just a writer of damn good fiction.

And I mean DAMN GOOD fiction!

Nice post, star and flag.



posted on Jan, 10 2010 @ 08:44 PM
link   
Don't forget about Jupiter's moon Europa which has an ocean underneath all that ice.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 12:13 AM
link   
Nice thread.

Having such an active neighbour will definitely give us a better insight into how our planet formed and how others can form.

All we need now is some methane emissions and we're all set to go travel there.

-m0r



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 07:49 AM
link   
nice thread...it just helps to strengthen the theories that life is more likely to be on one of saturns moons then on any other planet in our solar system.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:08 AM
link   
If we do eventually discover life on one of these moons in the form of bacteria , what ramnifications does this hold for the religions of the world ?

I think it will usher in a new age of space religions , and they will have to drastically re write the creation theory's

I cant wait for the discovery of bacteria or even some strange looking fish creature



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:10 AM
link   
reply to post by Shere Khaan
 



Earth: Yep life
Mars:Maybe
Europa: Maybe
Enceladus:Maybe

Well if any or all of those turn out to have life we will certainly have to rethink our ideas of how and where life forms. The two moons are outside the "Goldilocks" zone, so if our solar system is not unusual in its formation its very possible our Galaxy (and thus our universe) is flooded with life.



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:11 AM
link   
This is for the people who are saying theres no life out there but us..


out of the 12 planets in our own solorsystem


1 holds intelengent life....

3 moons & 1 more planet could potentialy hold other forms of life such a microbial

thats 5 all in total

now how many galaxys and stars are out there again???

not to mention planets


only arrogent idiots think where alone



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:24 AM
link   
Correct me if I am wrong, but I believe they're referring to geological activity and not necessarily biological? I believe the same comment was made in reference to Mars.

The Saturn is fascinating because the possibly of life on Titan, theorised silicon-based life (if it even exists)



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:27 AM
link   
Have they even considered it could be active volcanos like on other planets?

[edit on 11-1-2010 by SuperSlovak]



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:29 AM
link   
I was reading your article and thought to go and google it a bit, while doing so I came across this article which I thought was quite interesting.
www.newscientist.com...



posted on Jan, 11 2010 @ 08:32 AM
link   
reply to post by Helmkat
 


There was a theory that Gas giants can act like miniature stars and the enormous gravitational pull provides heat towards the moons. And, both Jupiter and Saturn have -literally- dozen of moons too.

Enceladus and Titan are both effected by the gravity of Saturn and the other moons in the system.



new topics

top topics



 
26
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join