It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Supermassive black hole struggles to swallow Milky Way

page: 2
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 10:10 PM
link   
reply to post by donhuangenaro
 


LOL it says believe to be at the center of galaxies, not that they believe they exist.

A better name for them is a Singularity, that works good and explains things better.




posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 02:14 AM
link   
reply to post by predator0187
 


Well something has to be holding galaxies together and creating their massive magnetic fields and produce the large gravitational forces needed to hold it together. A black hole as we think of them make sense visually and mathematically.

Sorry to bring back the doom and gloom but in relation to 2012 there is a lot of talk about a large discharge from the black hole causing the appearance of the "Blue Eye". What if this is just a sign that the black hole is full and is ready to belch to make room for seconds or thirds or fourths, etc, etc.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 11:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by links234
The idea behind this is that our black hole is of a sufficient age that it doesn't seem to consume so much matter. Younger black holes consume a great deal of matter and are easy to spot in the universe. It's the older ones that've run out of matter to consume that are the scary ones.

Super awesome photo of our nearest super massive matter monster


Please help me understand.

If this is a photo of the Center of the Milky Way - can someone point out where the "black hole" is? Also, is the Earth anywhere in this photo?

I know nothing about astronomy and am just trying to understand.

Thanks.



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 12:32 PM
link   
A quick question:

If the black hole started "feeding" again, would we be able to see it? Or is the jets only in the X-ray/non visible spectrum?

Last time i saw something about our local black hole, it had some stars circling pretty close, which where used to calculate it's mass, now it has me wondering if it would be visible to the naked eye if it did?



posted on Jan, 17 2010 @ 03:46 PM
link   

Originally posted by DEEZNUTZ
reply to post by predator0187
 


Well something has to be holding galaxies together and creating their massive magnetic fields and produce the large gravitational forces needed to hold it together. A black hole as we think of them make sense visually and mathematically...

Even though the the black hole that is thought to be at the center of the galaxy is big, it's not big enough to hold together the galaxy.

It is speculated that the Black hole in the center of the Galaxy is about 4 million times as massive as the Sun, which is relatively large when talking about stars. However, gravity does not work too well at a distance. It follows the inverse-square law, whereas its gravity decreases by a factor equivalent to the square of the distance.

In other words, at distances spanning across the galaxy, the gravity of suppermassive black hole in the middle of the galaxy is not strong enough to have a noticeable effect on most of the Galaxy.

Our Sun is probably more affected by the gravity from the other stars in its neighborhood than by this supermassive black hole.

No one knows what holds the galaxy together, but the black holes found in the center isn't massive enough to do the job. Physicists have theorized that invisible "dark matter" (matter that has mass, but cannot be seen) may be all around us and THAT is what is holding galaxies together.

Because gravity weakens considerably at a distance, it is more likely the mass that holds the galaxy together is all-pervasive, rather than concentrated in one spot.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 03:09 AM
link   
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


I'm just speculating so bear with me. All of what you said is true as to what we think things work like. Take light for example, say the light source was 1000 light years away? However, we have no way of knowing what has interacted with that light in terms of speed like a large gravitational source which are between the light source and Earth. We have no way of knowing if it's sped up or slowed down during it's transit.

Since Dark Matter and Energy are so prevelant it seems throughout the universe, it also seems that black holes are very prevelant and assumed to be at the center of every galaxy. We don't really know what happens to matter once it goes over the Event Horizon. Perhaps dark energy and dark matter are the digested material coming out in the jets eminating from black holes. Kinda like a volcano plume hitting the upper winds and spreading out. I think this is how the dark stuff is spread around. Like a plant pollinating(sp?), the dark matter and energy drives expansion of the galaxy so it can grow larger and spread out it's seed and gobble up weaker ones in the neighbourhood.

Maybe it has dimensional properties and will be used to power long distance space flights. WARP DRIVE!

I think if we look at galaxies like a living, breathing thing that needs to eat and expand then I think things will start to make a little more sense in a world that seems neither normal or organized.



posted on Jan, 18 2010 @ 03:45 AM
link   
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


The black hole is referred to as 'Sagittarius A', lots and lots of stars spinning around the black hole at the center of the galaxy.


Ultimately, what is seen is not the black hole itself, but observations that are consistent only if there is a black hole present near Sgr A*. The observed radio and infrared energy emanates from gas and dust heated to millions of degrees while falling into the black hole.



new topics

top topics



 
3
<< 1   >>

log in

join