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posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 06:39 PM
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Ok first off. Where would one learn to survive on their own out in the wilderness? I think I've heard about survival schools, but I'm sure that would cost a lot of money, which I don't have. Obviously I could read books, but I'm talking about a hands on sort of deal. Are their career opportunities knowing survival skills?

Just out of curiosity. Is their some sort of "under ground" military type force? Something separate from the U.S. military, like an organized group of possibly ex-military guys or something?

I ask these questions because I'd like to be able to survive. It's like when the native americans let some of their kids go to the white man's school and the kids return from their schooling. The chief says something along the lines, "They know your math, science, and what not, but they don't know how to kill a deer and have troubles enduring the winter."

I guess what I'm saying is the military looks appealing just for the fact you learn things like navigation and being dropped in the jungle and you have to survive. But, personally, fighting for the politicians and corporations is a turn off.

That's why I'm looking for an alternative, if one exists at all. Thanks!

p.s. Hopefully you understand what I'm trying to get across




posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 07:03 PM
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I'm sure there are many courses/schools that one could take to get survival training, there are also many videos/books on the web with many tips and know-how to do with survival and bushcrafting that are great as well.

The best thing would be to go camping and start to learn from there, it's mainly all to do with practice, the knowledge of plants and materials you might find or have at hand and what their uses can be,what items are necessary and where to find the basics such as water or food, how to build shelter, trap animals and what not. experience is the key to survival.



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 07:06 PM
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I can recommend a couple of books for you.

"SAS Survival Handbook, Revised Edition: For Any Climate, in Any Situation"
Thats a good start, and the basics that are covered are pretty solid.
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"Primitive Skills and Crafts: An Outdoorsman's Guide to Shelters, Tools, Weapons, Tracking, Survival, and More "

This one is a hit or miss, but you can gain alot of knowledge and try some stuff out by yourself at home. You can find what works and doesnt work, and develop your own skill set.

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The best way, is to just get into the wild. Get used to being out in nature, if youre not.
I would recommend also, getting in shape. But then again, I got in shape by hiking and climbing, but that was the hard way.


Buy yourself clothes needed for whatever climate you plan on being in.
sierra trading post is a good place to find discount equipment.

I always pack a waterproof jacket, and an extra pair of socks.

The way i started, is I learned about the marshes where I live. I learned about the plants and animals. Then I started camping out on the islands, with a tent and some amenities.

Then I traveled north, and camped in the mountains. I read books about North carolina, and the mountains there. I took a book of indigenous plants and birds with me on day hikes, and compared pics with the real thing, until I could identify quite a few. You train yourself... kind of. Like when you pass that tree/plant, you say it to yourself "Thats a fir tree" or "That is hemlock".

If you want to learn to camp without a tent, once again start by reading about it, then go out and try what you have learned. same with building a fire. I find that with alot of things that I read, I end up using my own variation of whatever subject is at hand.

Its about becoming comfortable with your environment, not knowing "tricks" or tips. If you are out there alone, and your environment is scary to you....well, tricks and knowledge isnt going to matter, now is it?

This is a lifestyle choice. Once outdoor adventure like survival, hiking, kayaking, mountain climbing and caving gets into your blood, you either love it or hate it.

So go out there, and get familiar. Thats as general as I can be. If you want to know anything specific, ask away. T



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 07:13 PM
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Go check out this web site
wilderness-survival



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:05 PM
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Thanks for all the information!

reply to post by InertiaZero
 


How long have you actually gone out in the wilderness by yourself?

And where would one go to test his/her skills? I'm from Kansas and their isn't a lot of "wilderness". haha



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by doped00
 


Oh wow. kansas huh?

I typed it into the browser, and I came up with flint hills? That looks like a good place to camp. National parks are great.

I have backpacked with full gear(tent/food/water), for 2 weeks. I usually go with friends. We practice the "leave no trace rule". I recommend looking it up.

I forgot to mention to always let people know where you plan to go. This isvery important. tell them WHEN you are going, and WHERE, so if you are lost they will know where to go to find you.

I have went with limited food, one set of clothes and a portable water filter for 5 days last summer.



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by InertiaZero
 


Sweet. I suppose it'd be a smart idea to tell someone where I'm going. haha


Thanks for the reply and that SAS book is on it's way.



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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Some of the very best survival teachers are there in kansas but I think they've retired, John and Gerry McPherson (prairie wolf productions). You also have the BOSS (boulder outdoor survival school) in Colorado which is excellent, but expensive. Most weeklong courses are going to run you about a grand, something I think you said you don't have.
I teach survival skills and if you can make it to Virginia I'd spend a week teaching you if you can make it here (no joke). I'm retired and have lotsa time on my hands and I'm always willing to teach people who really want to learn. Besides that I'm always looking for an excuse to go camping.

I can recommend some good books but I don;t know of any good video series that you can get your hands on.

Field guide to wilderness survival, by Tom Brown Jr.
Petersons Field guide to edible wild plants
Northern Bushcraft or Bushcraft (new title) by Mors Kochansky

There;s some pretty poor books out there and even worse videos where these people get out there with a video camera and basically teach others how to do everyhting wrong
Another way to learn is watching others make mistakes.
Survival skills can take a lifetime to master, a week to learn the basics.
Good luck!



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:42 PM
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I think you might actually be underestimating your own human brain. The human brain is programmed to figure out different situations that arise in the case of survivalism. Our human brains allow us to compute when we are cold "make a shelter". When we are hungry, "pick, collect, kill, harvest food. When we need to replicate. "you know"..

What I am saying as that it takes a human minimal experience to get the hang of survival. It is hardwired into our brains, and if one pays attention to the instincts it will come naturally.



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:52 PM
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dbl post srry

[edit on 7-1-2010 by wiredamerican]



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by doped00
Ok first off. Where would one learn to survive on their own out in the wilderness?


Boy Scouts should be a good place to start



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 09:01 PM
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The best way to learn survival is to try it.

In stead of reading books about survival. Try to visualize your self in survival mode somewhere in the wilderness. Then try it out.
What you experiance from the first trip will make the next one easier.



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 09:25 AM
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Hey there, I have considerable knowledge in the bush. Here in Canada most of us have lots of outdoor opportunities and more reasons to have a little bush knowledge in our back pockets just in case, plus me and my buddies do it for fun as well.

I recommend starting with shelter. A debris hut is probably the best, easiest, and warmest shelter. Learn how to spot a great natural set up in the bush that will facilitate in its construction. In survival situations, conservation of energy and efficiency are vital. A wind blown or fallen tree has the main frame already in place. see pics.

static.howstuffworks.com...

www.earth-connection.com...

The lean-to really sucks in my opinion. They are wide open to the elements wind and rain and you have to damage or kill trees to shingle them. A good debris hut is low, predator proof, wind proof and light proof, water proof, and like a cocoon. Make a basic A-frame low to the ground (remember your are in a lying position so it need not be high, and then pile as much forest floor debris on it as possible. A good one can absorb gallons of water before leaking. I spent three days in one a while back, it rained. Dry and warm. Each day I added more debris on and cleaned the interior and made it more and more comfortable. We also tapped white birch trees for nutritious sap and made pine needle tea to keep energy up. Get to know wildlife patterns and trails Then you can try to perfect snares and other traps.

Also recommend a good tough knife. I like the Kershaw Outkast, there are better ones but I can really beat it around and not worry about damaging a real expensive knife.

www.texasknifeworks.com...

For me short specific jaunts into the bush to try one skill at a time works best.

Shelter, then work on fire bow drills and then make specific trips to forage for plants. Learn how to layer clothing and which fabrics are best in survival (wool is best I think). Army surplus stores have good military issued wool pants. If possible look for German wool pants, They are awesome. Invest in top notch thermal undies and sock liners, tops and bottoms. Never wear cotton of any kind. Mittens over gloves, good wool or fur hat with ear flaps and good hood on warm parka, as you may want to wear them when sleeping. Remember you can always take off a layer if you get hot but if cold you can't always put more on. Don't go without enough clothing.

If you can make a good shelter and stay in it a couple days without really getting cold or exhausted then you have a good start on learning bush life. Try not to think of it as conquering nature but rather living simply.

Good luck



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 09:31 AM
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Hey there, the links to one of the debris hut pics didn't work.

here are a few more

www.theurbanabo.com...

world-wide-net.com...


lh4.ggpht.com...

wilderness-survival.bosonmedialocal.net...



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by sparrowstail
 


I have not tried a debris hut. This is neat stuff.

I agree with you, about having a decent knife. My brother buys the expensive knives, but I prefer the cheaper ones. I mean, youre going to knock it around and trash it, you might as well get a good cheap one. Just make sure it does the job. A serrated blade, to saw.


Personally, I prefer fleece over wool, only because fleece will dry faster than wool. Good suggestions, though. I have a british military wool sweater, and its the warmest thing I own.



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 02:59 PM
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Great information!

Thanks for the posts



posted on Jan, 9 2010 @ 05:22 AM
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Speaking from my past experiences, I found the best way to learn life skills (that’s what we are taking about here) is to network. I grew up hunting, fishing and camping and it has bin a big part of my life over the years. I gained most of my knowledge associating with people who loved doing these things as much as I do and made some great life long friend along the way.
I would recommend you buy a gun and join a gun club. Buy a fishing rod, preferably fly rod and just do it. Don’t worry about looking foolish, the more you practice the better you will get and you will meet some of the friendliest people on the planet down on the stream.
Also the one thing every one seams to forget about here on the survival site is gardening. Start a garden and store seeds. You can survive hunting, fishing and gathering but living after TSHTF will require the ability to know how to grow produce and store it over the winter. You need to think long term just in case.
Good luck and have fun.



posted on Jan, 9 2010 @ 06:53 AM
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Originally posted by murfdog
Speaking from my past experiences, I found the best way to learn life skills (that’s what we are taking about here) is to network. I grew up hunting, fishing and camping and it has bin a big part of my life over the years. I gained most of my knowledge associating with people who loved doing these things as much as I do and made some great life long friend along the way.
I would recommend you buy a gun and join a gun club. Buy a fishing rod, preferably fly rod and just do it. Don’t worry about looking foolish, the more you practice the better you will get and you will meet some of the friendliest people on the planet down on the stream.
Also the one thing every one seams to forget about here on the survival site is gardening. Start a garden and store seeds. You can survive hunting, fishing and gathering but living after TSHTF will require the ability to know how to grow produce and store it over the winter. You need to think long term just in case.
Good luck and have fun.


I like the cut of your jib murfdog. What species of fish do you go for? Looks like a trout of some kind in your avatar. My Dad introduced me to fly fishing (for sea trout), fly tying and hunting at a young age. Some of the nicest people I know, I met through these activities. What a thrill when we caught one fish, opened it up and found a hatch of insects in its belly, most still alive. Dad says we need some of these, hands me a little jar with these tiny mosquito larvae. Off to the tying shop to make these tiny little flies, then back down to the fishing hole. We returned with our limit. I now keep my Dad in a steady supply of Brown Hackles, his favorite fly.

To add to these benefits, hunting and fly fishing build patience, awareness, and character. Things that will help build other outdoor skills.

I am now trying to carve out a bow from a piece of white ash I cut from the bush. Not many primitive archers, or bow makers around my neck of the woods, so I am kinda on my own. If nothing else I am getting to know the hand tools from the old days, draw knife, wood rasp, wood scrapers.

Coolio, and good luck with all your outdoor pursuits




posted on Jan, 9 2010 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by sparrowstail
 


That is a palomino or golden trout, caught with an olive stone fly on the Loyalsock river upstate Pa.
That was actually the second time I caught that fish. I bagged him the day earlier and released him, and yes I let him go the second time too.

I’m glad to hear you are working on your carpentry skills. I am a carpenter by trade and that’s how I make my living. I should have suggested to the OP the same, especially learn some roofing skills, say cedar shake roofing. It would be a good skill to have if a permanent structure would need to be built off the grid so to speak. Can be lots of fun to learn as well.
Good luck to you my friend.



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