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Self destructing Supernova explosion may wipe out earth

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posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by superdebz
 



The blast from the thermonuclear explosion could strip away the Earth's ozone layer that keeps out deadly space radiation, scientists said.

Then why does it say it could destroy the ozone?




posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 08:33 AM
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Originally posted by superdebz
Im not worried 3000 lights years is a long way. There loads of stuff inbetween that. the shockwave has no way in hell reaching us, and any gamma ray burst would just be difused on anyother stars inbetween here and there.
I read someone that a supernova anything less than 1000 light years with its polls at us would pretty much melt our eyeballs and your organs before you got half way screamig "OHOHHHHH FFUUUUU-" the ozone would of been knocked off and the planet boiled to a sinder. niicee

If we can see the star system (and we can -- with a telescope), then there isn't anything between it and us.

In galactic terms, 3000 light-years is not that far away.

[edit on 1/6/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:09 AM
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Originally posted by sickofitall2012
reply to post by superdebz
 



The blast from the thermonuclear explosion could strip away the Earth's ozone layer that keeps out deadly space radiation, scientists said.

Then why does it say it could destroy the ozone?


because its the sun -_-"
They are one day from making a headline telling us that immigrants carry a super-bug that turns people into zombies -_-"



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:23 AM
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Question,

Not that I'm running around scared of the end now but I'm seriously confused about something here....Are the telescopes we use to view deep space not our eyes into the future? We aren't talking about seeing this event with our own eyes here on Earth we are talking about what the telescope has seen. Does this not mean that they have seen these stars at a closer distance than from here on Earth in turn that should mean that we have alot longer that 3200 years or whatever before this is a real problem? The optics should change the math unless I'm completly off point here.

Either way I'm gonna live my life every day to what end may come. Why is it that we are gonna blow up or get wiped out by something new everyday...Any body know anything about the Laws of Attraction?



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by superdebz
Im not worried 3000 lights years is a long way. There loads of stuff inbetween that. the shockwave has no way in hell reaching us, and any gamma ray burst would just be difused on anyother stars inbetween here and there.
I read someone that a supernova anything less than 1000 light years with its polls at us would pretty much melt our eyeballs and your organs before you got half way screamig "OHOHHHHH FFUUUUU-" the ozone would of been knocked off and the planet boiled to a sinder. niicee

If we can see the star system (and we can -- with a telescope), then there isn't anything between it and us.

In galactic terms, 3000 light-years is not that far away.

[edit on 1/6/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]


no its not. But supernovas dont reach that far. The biggest danger is a gamma ray burst. If that even happens. Then its still gotta get here. Even if we can see the star doesnt mean theres nothing inbetween us.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:34 AM
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How can they tell this will effect Earth can they see the magnetic poles from both celestial objects? Also if the objects poles are both pointed at Earth is this how they are assuming these will effect Earth or is it more of the effects from the explosion around the region we are discussing?


[edit on 1/6/10 by Ophiuchus 13]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:36 AM
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reply to post by wastedown
 



I think i know what you mean xD
the telescopes are our eyes into the past. When we use them, no matter how big. We are looking at the objects as they were. In this case, 3000-odd years ago.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:41 AM
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reply to post by superdebz
 

Right -- a really powerful gamma ray burst (GRB) from 3000 light-years away could kill us -- but it would have to be massive. However, a small GRB that is only 100 to 500 light-years away could kill us.

There is a caveat to all of this...GRB's seem to be directional, meaning the bulk of the energy output is in a concentrated stream -- something like a flashlight. The GRB would need to have its rotational poles aimed directly toward our solar system for it to affect us.

Not that I think this is likely to happen -- but it could.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:46 AM
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3,260 light years is not going to hurt us a tall, 3,260 light years is a huge distance infact it's 30841981340613412 Kilometers (And yes, that does look like I just mashed all the num pad with my fist) so we're quite some distance away. For a s.nova to affect us we would need to be within 500 - 1000 light years (4730365236290400 - 9460730472580800 km) range, although 1000 light years is stretching it a bit.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by Incendia vox
 


finally someone on my side



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by wastedown
 

Here's the thing...
...a gamma ray burst or a supernova could have already happened, and the energy is hurtling toward us -- but because we haven't seen the light from that event yet, we don't know it happened.

For example, a star exactly 100 light-years away could have produced a gamma ray burst (GRB) 99 years plus 364 days ago, but we wouldn't know about it until tomorrow because the light has not reached us yet. The energy from the GRB can move 99.9% of the speed of light, so we would not have too much warning after seeing the light from this GRB before the gamma rays fry us.

Like I said in my post above, I'm not worrying about this happening, but it is possible. It's much more likely that you would get hit by a falling meteorite than a GRB destroying human life on Earth.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by superdebz
reply to post by Incendia vox
 


finally someone on my side


Oh -- I'm on your side, too.

I'm not worried about a supernova from T Pyxidis killing us. I'm only saying that in general it is possible for a GRB 3000 light-years away to adversely affect life on Earth in a major way.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:30 AM
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Well, this could happen. Maybe I'll get killed before I finish typing this text. Maybe a meteor will fall on the room I am. Maybe aliens are heading toward the Earth willing to slay us all. Maybe the illuminati are plotting a false flag nuclear attack in my city. Who knows ?
Worrying brings nothing : it either takes you away from finding a way to fix problems that can be fixed, or makes you lose some time on problems that can't. Let's just live our lives. If this supernova kills us, we'll be dead before even noticing it, won't we ?


Edit : well, I'm still alive. Great !

[edit on 6-1-2010 by Jalis]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:51 AM
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What the hell am I lookin' at? When does this happen in the movie?

Now. You're looking at now sir, everything that happens now is happening now.

What happened to then?

We passed it.

When?

Just now. We're at now-now.

Go back to then.

When?

Now.

Now?

Now!

I can't.

Why?

We missed it.

When?

Just now.

When will then be now?

Soon.

Spaceballs

I was first introduced to the concept of a GRB extinction event in an episode of ultimate disasters (or something like that) on discovery channel. The concept is sound, although it is a bit of a guess as to how it would have to happen. The math is solid on the intensities, but the functionality of stars during massive explosions is still not completely understood.

As for the timing, it could happen now..well, then, but just now.


There are so many stars out there and any of them could theoretically produce a GRB at any time for various reasons. GRBs are generally accepted to travel at or near the speed of light, so as many have said, a GRB that originated in a system 3200LY away 3200 years ago would reach us at any moment, but we won't know it happened until it is happening. Just like we would not know the sun blinked out until 8 minutes after it actually does. It's all relative, of course.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by Slih_09

Originally posted by Divinorumus

Originally posted by krystalice
This has nothing to do with 2012.

Why not? If that star exploded 3258 years ago, it's affects would be arriving here just in time for the 2012 doom party, would it not?


Even if we did see the star disappear or explode in this year i doubt it very much that we would feel it's effects in just a couple of years. Those things don't travel at light speed or close to it.

Radiation travels at the same speed light does. It won't be a concussion blast that blows away our ozone if this happen, but the radiation itself, and that will arrive instantly the moment you see the star explode from Earth! You'll feel THAT here TOMORROW if that star exploded 3270 years ago.

And these other people that don't understand that when they see that star in the sky from Earth today, they are actually looking back into the past across the universe. Nothing you see in the sky above right now is LIVE and NOW. The sky is a sort of visual time-machine. If you saw that star blow up today from Earth, it didn't really blow up today, it would have had to blow up 3270 years ago for you to see it do so from Earth today.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by Divinorumus
 


That is what I was thinking as well. I am troubled that the article doesn't give any sort of estimation as to when this dwarf may nova. What do you think?



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 01:12 PM
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Originally posted by sickofitall2012
That is what I was thinking as well. I am troubled that the article doesn't give any sort of estimation as to when this dwarf may nova. What do you think?

Who knows. I've peeked into my crystal ball and I don't actually see it having exploded within the time frame necessary to have any affect upon us still alive here on Earth today. And, what with the world as we know it coming to an end in 673 days from now, I would say it's a non-threat issue myself and nothing we would need to worry about. It's that other thang that will get us first.


Everything you see in the night sky is on time-delay, anywhere from a few to billions of years on delay (excluding those objects on a shorter delay because they are part of our solar system and much closer).

[edit on 6-1-2010 by Divinorumus]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 06:30 PM
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duplicate thought ...

[edit on 1/6/2010 by centurion1211]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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Here is a slightly more scientific article from ScieneDaily:


T Pyxidis Soon To Be A Type Ia Supernova T Pyxidis. - Hubble image. by Staff Writers Washington DC (SPX) Jan 05, 2010 Astronomers have uncovered evidence that a massive, explosive white dwarf star in a binary star system with a Sun-like star in our Milky Way Galaxy is growing in mass and is much closer to our solar system than previously thought. The report is being presented by Drs. Edward M. Sion, Patrick Godon and student Timothy McClain of Villanova University at the 215th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC.

This result is of special interest because it may shed light on the still unidentified type of stellar objects that explode as Type Ia supernovae, the kind of supernova which has been used to demonstrate that the expansion of the universe is accelerating.

The close binary system T Pyxidis, located in the southern hemisphere constellation Pyxis ("the Compass Box"), is known as a recurrent nova because its massive white dwarf star has suffered thermonuclear (nova) explosions approximately every 20 years with its previous recorded nova explosions occurring in 1890, 1902, 1920, 1944 and 1967, making it 44 years overdue for its next thermonuclear explosion. Nobody understands why it is has stopped its thermonuclear explosions.


Link to Full Article



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:27 PM
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Members may find this article interesting:



Nir Shaviv is a senior lecturer in physics at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel:

"Once every few decades a massive star from our galaxy, the Milky Way, runs out of fuel and explodes, in what is known as a supernova. Cosmic rays (high-energy particles like gamma rays) spew out in all directions and if the Earth happens to be in the way, they can trigger an ice age. If the Earth already has a cold climate then an extra burst of cosmic rays could make things really icy and perhaps cause a number of species to become extinct. The Earth is at greatest risk when it passes through a spiral arm of the Milky Way, where most of the supernova occur. This happens approximately every 150m years. Paleoclimate indicators show that there has been a corresponding cold period on Earth, with more ice at the poles and many ice ages during these times.

"We are nearly out of the Sagittarius-Carina arm of the Milky Way now and Earth should have a warmer climate in a few million years. But, in around 60m years we will enter the Perseus arm and ice-house conditions are likely to dominate again."

Chance of encountering a supernova in the next 70 years: Low


www.guardian.co.uk...

I found it interesting also, that the Earth's position in the Milky Way has such a profound effect on Global Climate. According to Shaviv, the Earth is entering an area of the Milky Way that results in a warmer climate. There is ANOTHER alternative to Al Gore and his AGW non-sense.



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