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At What Point Do I....

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posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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Looking for some advice here from -specifically- Parents, whether their children be young, adolescent, teenagers, doesn't matter.

Raising children in this jacked-up world can be very tough (I don't have to tell you that, do I?). Anyway, I see my kids being influenced by popular culture, religion, MSM, TPTB, etc...

At what point do you begin to teach your kids that not everything is what it seems?

Specifically, your ideas on-
* Aliens/UFOs
* NWO
* The "War On Terrorism"
* The fallacies of their "history" books in school
* Main stream media
* Survival
* what if TSHTF
(can't think of anymore right now but you get the point...)

When I was 12, my mom bought me a copy of "Chariots Of The Gods" (don't laugh, the book changed my life and made me begin to ask MANY questions). She is a VERY conservative, Christian, Southern school teacher. But, I think it was her way of showing me that everything may not be as it seems.

So, is it ever too early to begin to tell your kids THE TRUTH?




posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 12:38 AM
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Best thing anyone did for me was teach me to camp and fish. Meant that I developed an appreciation for the outdoors and was able to survive for weeks if not months with a bit of preparation. Also was great fun!

Spend time with your kids! Just being with your kids means that some of your attitude to life wears off on them.

Remember though that your kids need to have fun in their lives. The reality of life should be reserved for adults. No kids should be having nightmares about climate change these days.

Teach them that fear is the most negative emotion.

Encourage them to have an open mind and challenge them gently when they parrot mainstream thinking to show them that all may not be as it seems.

Lastly, so long as they feel they have options and skills it won't all seem hopeless.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 12:41 AM
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reply to post by Signals
 


Great book!

The only things you can do for your kids is:

Do not take away their self esteem, build it.

Do not brainwash them into any religion or belief - encourage them to explore all possibilities.

Love, nurture and protect them.

If you accomplish this, you are a great parent.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 12:49 AM
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reply to post by Signals
 


From my own experience, when you (as a child, adolescent, teenager) are ready, you will start asking questions. Young people need to question things for themselves in order to have the full drive to find out 'the truth'... When the time is right for them.

Rebellious as I was/am, I will always question what ANYONE told me. I grew up in a strict and religious background and no one ever told me about ufo's etc... My dreams and curiosity guided me. The best I think, is to plant the seed that there is more to this world, and let them find their own way IF they are interested.

Timing is everything...people need to find things out as they go along and on their own accord.
My silly opinion though...



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 02:29 AM
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reply to post by Signals
 




is it ever too early to begin to tell your kids THE TRUTH?


I would begin by accepting that you yourself don't know the "truth." It's possible there might really be leigitimite non-alien explanations for UFO's and abduction memories. It's possible muslim terrorists really did hijack planes on 9-11. It's possible there really is an anthropomorphic vengeful diety with jealousy issues in charge of the universe. We may think these things unlikely, but it's intellectually dishonest to dismiss them as possibilities.

Is teaching your children your own personal opinions as fact really any different than people who support "official stories" teaching their own opinions as fact?



At what point do you begin to teach your kids that not everything is what it seems?


I don't think any age is too early, but I would be cautious about teaching opinion and theory as fact. Instead, I would try to teach my children to make their own decisions. I would teach them to pay attention. I would teahc them to accept that there are times when they might not be able to know answers, and to perceive not knowing as preferable to latching onto an answer just for the sake of having an answer.

True story:
When I was about age 7, I asked my mother if Santa Claus was real. She did not say yes, and she did not say no. She explained that some people believed in Santa, and that some peopel didn't. But as for me...I would have to decide on my own what I believed because she wasn't going to hand me an answer.

I think that was a good lesson.

It is one I would encourage anyone to pass on to their children.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 03:24 AM
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reply to post by LordBucket
 





We may think these things unlikely, but it's intellectually dishonest to dismiss them as possibilities.


Very well said. I will keep that in mind from now



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