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Labels and the BOX they put us in!

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posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by anoymous7
 


Thanks anoymous7.

I think I am going to put this on my favorites on my profile page. To remind me of my vow.




posted on Mar, 1 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by endisnighe
 


Well, as I have said many times, endisnighe, I survived my life, not because of those labels or boxes I was put in, but in spite of them, meaning I refused to put put in some ignorant box on a piece of paper.

I am white, heterosexual, and single, but guess what, I could care less.

The first two of those boxes are permanent, the third is not necessarily.

I am 6'4", 360 pounds, and a strong individual, but guess what, I could care less.

The first one will never change, unless I shrink, and I doubt I will, the second one fluctuates, if I exercise or do not, or whatever, and the last one is something I both see as something I can and cannot control.

I am strong-willed, but willing to listen, I am physically strong, but can change that by becoming stronger, or acting passively, as needed, or use intelligence.

Racism : Self-Empowerment or Being an Ignorant Bully, and Suppressing Freedom

About the one and only area I put things or people into boxes, is law-abiding, or not law-abiding citizens, legal immigrants, or illegal immigrants, corrupt politicians, or immorally corrupt politicians, that list goes on.

By the way there's a movie by that title, and I suggest you rent it.

Law Abiding Citizen New Trailer - Featurette【HD】


I see us as human beings first, born on a planet called Earth, who all just happened to be born in different countries, with different skin color, and languages.

...but guess what, I could care less.

We are all human beings first, and animals second, and if we act human, or act as an animal, it is up to us, to make our choices, and God to judge us.

Not each other judging each other.

I know one individual who decided he wanted to put other people in boxes.

And he was one of the worst human beings to walk this planet.

IBM and the Holocaust: The Strategic Alliance Between Nazi Germany and America's Most Powerful Corporation




Amazon Review :

Was IBM, "The Solutions Company," partly responsible for the Final Solution? T

hat's the question raised by Edwin Black's IBM and the Holocaust, the most controversial book on the subject since Daniel Jonah Goldhagen's Hitler's Willing Executioners.

Black, a son of Holocaust survivors, is less tendentiously simplistic than Goldhagen, but his thesis is no less provocative: he argues that IBM founder Thomas Watson deserved the Merit Cross (Germany's second-highest honor) awarded him by Hitler, his second-biggest customer on earth.

"IBM, primarily through its German subsidiary, made Hitler's program of Jewish destruction a technologic mission the company pursued with chilling success," writes Black.

"IBM had almost single-handedly brought modern warfare into the information age [and] virtually put the 'blitz' in the krieg."

The crucial technology was a precursor to the computer, the IBM Hollerith punch card machine, which Black glimpsed on exhibit at the U.S. Holocaust Museum, inspiring his five-year, top-secret book project.

The Hollerith was used to tabulate and alphabetize census data.

Black says the Hollerith and its punch card data ("hole 3 signified homosexual ... hole 8 designated a Jew") was indispensable in rounding up prisoners, keeping the trains fully packed and on time, tallying the deaths, and organizing the entire war effort.

Hitler's regime was fantastically, suicidally chaotic; could IBM have been the cause of its sole competence: mass-murdering civilians?

Better scholars than I must sift through and appraise Black's mountainous evidence, but clearly the assessment is overdue.

The moral argument turns on one question: How much did IBM New York know about IBM Germany's work, and when?

Black documents a scary game of brinksmanship orchestrated by IBM chief Watson, who walked a fine line between enraging U.S. officials and infuriating Hitler.

He shamefully delayed returning the Nazi medal until forced to--and when he did return it, the Nazis almost kicked IBM and its crucial machines out of Germany.

(Hitler was prone to self-defeating decisions, as demonstrated in How Hitler Could Have Won World War II.)

Black has created a must-read work of history.

But it's also a fascinating business book examining the colliding influences of personality, morality, and cold strategic calculation.

--Tim Appelo


Let us remember the ignorance of those trying to sort people into boxes, so that people like Adolph Hitler and Thomas Watson cannot march us into the Concentration Camps, again, because if it were not for people like a few brave souls, like Smedley Butler, America would have been strewn with Fascist Concentration Camps, and you and I may not have been born here to begin with to remember those atrocities.


Quote from : Wikipedia : Smedly Butler

Smedley Darlington Butler (July 30, 1881 – June 21, 1940), nicknamed "The Fighting Quaker" and "Old Gimlet Eye", was a Major General in the U.S. Marine Corps and, at the time of his death, the most decorated Marine in U.S. history.

During his 34 years of service, Butler was awarded 16 medals, five of which were for heroism.

He is one of only 19 people to be twice awarded the Medal of Honor, one of three to be awarded a Marine Corps Brevet Medal and a Medal of Honor, and the only person to be awarded the Brevet Medal and a Medal of Honor for two different actions.

In addition to his military achievements, he served as the Director of Public Safety in Philadelphia for two years and was an outspoken critic of U.S. military adventurism.

In his 1935 book War is a Racket, he described the workings of the military-industrial complex and, after retiring from service, became a popular speaker at meetings organized by veterans, pacifists and church groups in the 1930s.

Butler was involved in controversy in 1934 when he told a congressional committee that a group of wealthy industrialists had approached him to lead a military coup to overthrow Franklin D. Roosevelt's government, allegations that came to be known as the Business Plot.

Those he said were involved denied it, and the media ridiculed the allegations.

After a busy season of speeches and lectures he checked himself into the hospital after feeling ill and died a short time later.


There are a few people who refuse to go along with the status quo.

I refuse to fit into a box because I will not let other people's ignorance put me into a $9,000 box six feet under, bury me in a cheap pine box, face down.

So the world can kiss my ass good-bye.

[edit on 1-3-2010 by SpartanKingLeonidas]



posted on Jan, 22 2011 @ 04:28 AM
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Wow, just read through this thread and WOW, I failed.

I will still attempt to keep the vow, we can only improve or we regress.



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