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National Guard ad revives Nazi oath to Hitler: “Always place mission first,” not US Constitution

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posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:31 PM
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Disclaimer: The headline came directly from Infowars.com, where I first viewed this video clip.

I thought this propaganda video for the US National Guard was very powerful. Sharp, crisp video. Very moving music. And the theme places "mission first."

The video portrays the National Guard as true warriors, also compassionate to the American citizens.



Infowars.com has a bit more of an issue with it though:


This directly states that the FIRST duty of an American soldier is to achieve the mission dictated by military leadership, NOT the defense of the US Constitution. Brain-washing soldiers to place the mission first, that is, “just follow orders” given by der Fuehrer (“the leader” in German) rather than being responsible for obeying the Constitution and laws of war dramatizes the US shift into fascism.

Nazi German soldiers had such an oath:

“I swear by God this sacred oath that I shall render unconditional obedience to Adolf Hitler, the Führer of the German Reich, supreme commander of the armed forces, and that I shall at all times be prepared, as a brave soldier, to give my life for this oath.”
www.infowars.com...


So what do you think? Brilliant advertisement to recruit and brag about the National Guard? Or, true propaganda piece with a hidden agenda to it?




posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:33 PM
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I am choosing 'B'. The oath is to uphold the constitution, not follow orders.

Whats next, swearing in to the president, instead of the country?

Oh...wait....



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
 


The National Guard are entities of the state they are located (i.e. North Carolina National Guard, Ohio National Guard, etc..). It is the Militia Act of 1903, they are not eligible for service in the national armed services as a whole, although individuals can be drafted, I think.
www.history.army.mil...

This is why they swear to protect the state, not the constitution.

They are militia that are well trained, so when the need arises they will not cut and run like in the American Revolutionary War. I am just paraphasing the site above. My Navy recruiter talked about that after I swore in at MEPS; regular military still swear to up-hold the constitution of the United States of America, or at least they did in September of 2003

[edit on 5-1-2010 by Dookie Master]



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
I am choosing 'B'. The oath is to uphold the constitution, not follow orders.

Whats next, swearing in to the president, instead of the country?

Oh...wait....


If there ever does become a "civilian national army," I have a feeling they would swear direct allegiance to the President.

Scary guess...hopefully doesn't become a reality.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:43 PM
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Originally posted by Dookie Master
reply to post by MOFreemason
 


The National Guard are entities of the state they are located (i.e. North Carolina National Guard, Ohio National Guard, etc..). It is the Militia Act of 1903, they are not eligible for service in the national armed services as a whole, although individuals can be drafted, I think.
www.history.army.mil...

This is why they swear to protect the state, not the constitution.


Some changes were made to the autonomy of the National Guard though. They are no longer under the direction of state Governors and can be called for action directly by the POTUS.



# The John Warner Defense Authorization Act of 2007 Pub.L. 109-364

Federal law was changed in section 1076 so that the Governor of a state is no longer the sole commander in chief of their state's National Guard during emergencies within the state. The President of the United States will now be able to take total control of a state's National Guard units without the governor's consent.[17] In a letter to Congress all 50 governors opposed the increase in power of the president over the National Guard.[18]

# The National Defense Authorization Act 2008 Pub.L. 110-181

Repeals provisions in section 1076 in Pub.L. 109-364 but still enables the President to call up the National Guard of the United States for active federal military service during Congressionally sanctioned national emergency or war. Places the National Guard Bureau directly under the Department of Defense as a joint activity. Promoted the Chief of the National Guard Bureau from a three-star to a four-star general.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by MOFreemason
 


These are stop-loss measures. I had heard of the troop call up back in the day, but I attributed it to just the reserves, not the National Guard. It is a sobering thought that the US Gov. can take the National Guards role, essentially removing any trained militia from the control of individual states, which sh!+$ on our states rights as a whole. They now have two masters, which will they serve when both call? Good thoughts though. I just went to find my pistol to start cleaning it. Starting my own militia...



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:31 AM
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Why all the defense when security is the payday of today.

The Guard is called in for natural disasters and when
state laws or federal laws can not be enforced.

Those missions are under the Constitution.
However the Guard was sent off to Korea and perhaps
overseas at times.

ED: testing input but link ok:
video.google.com...#
JFK JR had the Coast Guard taken out of command.

[edit on 1/6/2010 by TeslaandLyne]

[edit on 1/6/2010 by TeslaandLyne]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:49 AM
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I think that this is simply marketing to a very broad base of potential recruits. They are clearly illustrating that the "mission" could take you practically anywhere within the scope given to the National Guard.

If you read into it too deeply, you could apply an underlying message to virtually any advertisement.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 02:10 PM
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Sorry watched the Ad I must have missed the part it said Mission before country. You swear the same oath enlisting:


"I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God."


Mission first is in reference to accomplishing a mission over other instances that come up during that mission. If the enlistment oath changes than I will start to worry.

Least that is my take on this.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 02:13 PM
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Originally posted by drift393
Sorry watched the Ad I must have missed the part it said Mission before country.


Song Title: "NATIONAL GUARD - CALL OF THE WARRIOR"
Written and Produced by: Mike Brassell
Video Created by the Strength Readiness Support Center (SRSC), National Guard Bureau

Lyrics:

Warrior the Ethos
Code of the Bellator (Warrior)
A hero will rise

Mos bellatoris (Code of the Warrior)
Ego primus omnium munus (I will always place the mission first)
Ego numquam cladem accipiam (I will never accept defeat)
I will live by this credo
I will protect the U.S. and I will fight to liberate all!

Numquam Deseram (Never quit)
Numquam commilitionem collapsum relinquam
(Never leave a fallen comrade)
I will never leave him!

I will live by this credo
I will protect the U.S. and I will fight to liberate
I will fight wherever called!

I will always place the mission first
I will never ever accept defeat
I will never quit, I never will
I will never leave a fallen comrade

Fiducia Officium (Loyalty, Duty)
Virtus Honor Veneratio (Personal Courage, Honor, Respect)
I am an American Soldier
Stipendium ante ingenium (Service before Self)
I fight for one and all!

[edit on 6-1-2010 by MOFreemason]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 02:23 PM
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reply to post by drift393
 


I agree with you on that drift. Same oath I took 7 years ago. Same oath all will take when they enlist.

In terms of the mission first part. People are reading into too much.

Since our mission is to protect the Constitution, from foreign and domestic enemies, wouldn't that mean we are thus putting Country, the People, the Constitution, etc first?



posted on Jan, 12 2010 @ 10:39 PM
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The quote is taken from the Soldier's Creed-

"I am an American Soldier.

I am a Warrior and member of a team. I serve the people of the United States and live the Army Values.

I will always place the mission first.

I will never accept defeat.

I will never quit.

I will never leave a fallen comrade.

I am disciplined, physically and mentally tough, trained and proficient in my warrior tasks and drills. I always maintain my arms, my equipment and myself.

I am an expert and I am a professional.

I stand ready to deploy, engage, and destroy the enemies of the United States of America in close combat.

I am guardian of freedom and the American way of life.

I am an American Soldier."

The specific section it is in (lines 3-6) is called the "warrior ethos."

All Soldiers swear to the Constitution, National Guard included. I think the Guard also swears to their state constitutions.

This creed in no way challenges our oath.

As Soldiers we have two purposes for existing- accomplishing the mission and the welfare of our fellow Soldiers. We always place the mission first, ie before the welfare of ourself or our comrades.

And its the mission, not the orders. There are a lot of ways to skin a cat, as long as you end up with a skinned cat at the end of the day.

We're not swearing to "der furher" or any specific person. Its a reminder that we have a mission, and its accomplishment is vital to the defense of the Constitution or the interests of the United States. Otherwise it wouldn't be a mission, and we could all go home.

I see absolutely no coorelation between "mission first" and a nazi oath. The oath doesn't even mention mission. But if there is some connection, we beat them to the punch- the phrase has been used in Army mottos pretty much since there was an Army.

Another ridiculous story from infowars.



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