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How Russia Is About to Dramatically Change the World

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posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:03 AM
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Originally posted by Davidwolf

it would say it going to happen alot earlier than we think, and it wont just eb over oil, that will be another one of many reasons. i just hope all us innocent people can cope with whats is about to come.


I wish you were wrong but I think that you're right. I've never been a chicken little type of guy but over the last year or so, I wake up wondering if today will be the day something huge and terrible will happen worldwide. I think it's coming soon... war probably.




posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:15 AM
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Originally posted by Aggie Man
Talk about a day late and a dollar short....oil will be obsolete in the near future, as alt. fuels are developed.

I give this story a BIG GIANT


Even if you were right, poor old Joe public will still have to pay an arm and a leg for whatever replaces oil UNLESS it is an energy source that is created and used by the individual or small groups...true "free" energy.

[edit on 6/1/2010 by nerbot]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 09:17 AM
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reply to post by Donny 4 million
 




www.eia.doe.gov...(2009).pdf

*NOTE: The Exxon was total fuel use, this is electricity generation only. But again, fossil fuel use is increasing.


Even if you were right, poor old Joe public will still have to pay an arm and a leg for whatever replaces oil UNLESS it is an energy source that is created and used by the individual or small groups...true "free" energy.

That doesn't mean it's free at all. You will always have a cost for producing the energy. Rooftop solar for example, has extremely high capital cost. i.e. There is a reason Macropower is not catching on.

[edit on 6/1/2010 by C0bzz]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by [davinci]
 


They aren't discovering new oil reserves, they are simply going back and assessing how much oil was left in the these old oil fields because it simply wasn't profitable to extract it back in the day when there was so much more rich sources of sweet crude. The lower grade crude left in these old field is not going to supply us for too long, and will be much more expensive to extract and refine.

The reason you are seeing an expansion in refining capabilities is that all the new oil supplies are going to take a lot more refining in order to process. The good news is that this creates jobs. The days of big easy profits for oil companies is coming to a close.

You might want to consider that people in the oil industry are likely to be overly exuberant over what they find, as they desire to maintain the oil monopoly.

If I were to choose who to trust between the oil companies and the government, I would choose the government. The oil companies proved long ago that they care nothing about people, only about profit, and they don't mind steam rolling over people and communities to get their profit.

Natural gas is on a boom however, as a new drilling process that allows a company to drill down, and then across to tap previously unreachable gas reserves has been recently developed. The U.S. has plenty of natural gas reserves now to supply us for the next century. The bad part is that Exxon bought the company that developed the process, so once again, Exxon retains a monopoly control over our energy sources.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by C0bzz
 


Good stuff. I look at charts all week and won't trade a stock with out a hard look. I prefer as much passive solar as my neighbors can tolorate.
There was a good solar thread by DaddyBear I think.
"Lowes wants to turn solar installation in to weekend projects"


Really
Good point on the loooooooooooooong list of prooooooooooducts.

[edit on 6-1-2010 by Donny 4 million]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by Rockpuck
 



This means the Rubble will climb, the Dollar will fall.. while there will be "more" Oil, the price in American Dollars will rise.


That is good news for workers in the U.S., because that means that the cost of U.S. workers will drop, equalizing the current artificial imbalance in the cost of U.S. labor created by the artificially high dollar.

Keeping the cost of U.S. labor high is the real goal of China and Japan in order to maintain their trade advantage.

This plays well into the hands of U.S. corporate elites whose wealth is artificially increased while at the same time their power over the U.S. middle class is also increased, enabling them to buy up assets at bargain prices.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:31 AM
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Originally posted by poet1b
reply to post by Rockpuck
 



This means the Rubble will climb, the Dollar will fall.. while there will be "more" Oil, the price in American Dollars will rise.




This plays well into the hands of U.S. corporate elites whose wealth is artificially increased while at the same time their power over the U.S. middle class is also increased, enabling them to buy up assets at bargain prices.


Wish I understood the dollar better.
The market has been making very interesting gains. Sneaky in my opnion.
Whats new!
Early morning huge buys in Solar. Oil hasn't made a big splash lately.
EXXON is still down 30 percent from two years a go.
Wind seems to be in a little slide (maybe just my holdings).



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by Donny 4 million

Really
Good point on the loooooooooooooong list of prooooooooooducts.

[edit on 6-1-2010 by Donny 4 million]


Hahaha!!! Thanks, Donny. There are actually somewhere around 6000 products that need petroleum to be made, I believe. So, it goes way past finding away to fuel your car or an airplane.
I believe something like 30% of all crude oil pumped out of the ground goes into the creation of these products. I don't mean to fuel the machines that make the products but into the creation of the products themselves.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
reply to post by buddhasystem
 


Except.. Russia does not sell Oil in Dollars. They sell Oil in Rubbles.


Wrong. Russia sells all its oil in dollars supporting the U.S. economy. I'm russian and I know this for sure. The real shift in the world will happen when Russia starts selling it in rubles. Then ruble will immediately become a world reserve currency (or at least regional) as europeans and ex-ussr states will have to acquire reserves of rubles to buy the oil. Some steps have already been made - they are creating oil stock exchange in Saint Petersburg.

Same applies for gas.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:39 AM
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Originally posted by Donny 4 million

Really
Good point on the loooooooooooooong list of prooooooooooducts.

[edit on 6-1-2010 by Donny 4 million]


Hahaha!!! Thanks, Donny. There are actually somewhere around 6000 products that need petroleum to be made, I believe. So, it goes way past finding away to fuel your car or an airplane.
I believe something like 30% of all crude oil pumped out of the ground goes into the creation of these products. I don't mean to fuel the machines that make the products but into the creation of the products themselves.
The documentary goes into the fact that although solar and wind could be very good alternative energy sources, we don't have the infrastructure to pump that energy around the country and we're doing nothing to create it. It would cost billions and we're not doing it.
It might very well be too late to sustain our way of life.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:39 AM
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Few realize that Russia's tremendous reserves of oil still don't solve many of it's inherent economic problems. Lack of a viable manufacturing base, military and security demands, general backwardness keep a dwindling population at a desperately low level of subsistence despite the newly created wealth.

Interesting assessment of problems Russia's size and unique geography create:


www.stratfor.com...

Russia has no good warm-water ports to facilitate international trade (and has spent much of its history seeking access to one). Russia does have long rivers, but they are not interconnected as the Mississippi is with its tributaries, instead flowing north to the Arctic Ocean, which can support no more than a token population. The one exception is the Volga, which is critical to Western Russian commerce but flows to the Caspian, a storm-wracked and landlocked sea whose delta freezes in the winter (along with the entire Volga itself).

Developing such unforgiving lands requires a massive outlay of funds simply to build the road and rail networks necessary to achieve the most basic of economic development. The cost is so extreme that Russia’s first ever intercontinental road was not completed until the 21st century, and it is little more than a two-lane path for much of its length. Between the lack of ports and the relatively low population densities, little of Russia’s transport system beyond the St. Petersburg/Moscow corridor approaches anything that hints of economic rationality.

Russia also has no meaningful external borders. It sits on the eastern end of the North European Plain, which stretches all the way to Normandy, France, and Russia’s connections to the Asian steppe flow deep into China. Because Russia lacks a decent internal transport network that can rapidly move armies from place to place, geography forces Russia to defend itself following two strategies. First, it requires massive standing armies on all of its borders. Second, it dictates that Russia continually push its boundaries outward to buffer its core against external threats.

Both strategies compromise Russian economic development even further. The large standing armies are a continual drain on state coffers and the country’s labor pool; their cost was a critical economic factor in the Soviet fall. The expansionist strategy not only absorbs large populations that do not wish to be part of the Russian state and so must constantly be policed — the core rationale for Russia’s robust security services — but also inflates Russia’s infrastructure development costs by increasing the amount of relatively useless territory Moscow is responsible for.

Russia’s labor and capital resources are woefully inadequate to overcome the state’s needs and vulnerabilities, which are legion. These endemic problems force Russia toward central planning; the full harnessing of all economic resources available is required if Russia is to achieve even a modicum of security and stability. One of the many results of this is severe economic inefficiency and a general dearth of an internal consumer market. Because capital and other resources can be flung forcefully at problems, however, active management can achieve specific national goals more readily than a hands-off, American-style model. This often gives the impression of significant progress in areas the Kremlin chooses to highlight.

But such achievements are largely limited to wherever the state happens to be directing its attention. In all other sectors, the lack of attention results in atrophy or criminalization. This is particularly true in modern Russia, where the ruling elite comprises just a handful of people, starkly limiting the amount of planning and oversight possible. And unless management is perfect in perception and execution, any mistakes are quickly magnified into national catastrophes. It is therefore no surprise that the Russian economy has now fallen the furthest of any major economy during the current recession.


[edit on 6-1-2010 by mmiichael]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by poet1b
reply to post by [davinci]
 


They aren't discovering new oil reserves, they are simply going back and assessing how much oil was left in the these old oil fields because it simply wasn't profitable to extract it back in the day when there was so much more rich sources of sweet crude. The lower grade crude left in these old field is not going to supply us for too long, and will be much more expensive to extract and refine.



Natural gas is on a boom however, as a new drilling process that allows a company to drill down, and then across to tap previously unreachable gas reserves has been recently developed. The U.S. has plenty of natural gas reserves now to supply us for the next century. The bad part is that Exxon bought the company that developed the process, so once again, Exxon retains a monopoly control over our energy sources.


I remember those days. The Texas governor was selling his saddle at his yard sale. Houston was loosing 5,000 people a week.
You could buy a backhoe for less than a grand.

Yeah! We need oil but we also buy diamonds we don't need .
Same control. Liquid Gold,Texas Tea that is.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by really
 


Waste caused by oil refinery has pushed out the natural ingredients for these products in your list, because if oil companies couldn't find an industrial use for this stuff, they would have to pay for its disposal.

The result of all of this byproduct of oil refinery has been the destruction of businesses that normally could make a profit producing the superior natural ingredients to these products, and resulted in massive global pollution of very environmentally unfriendly products.

Remember the Texas sized island of plastic floating in the ocean?

Cutting back massively on oil refinery waste products would revive small businesses around the globe.

It would also move us away from being a wasteful disposable society living in a rats maze of garbage, to a society which produces quality products with far longer useful life spans. Less garbage in, less garbage out.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:57 AM
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Originally posted by poet1b


Remember the Texas sized island of plastic floating in the ocean?

Cutting back massively on oil refinery waste products would revive small businesses around the globe.

To a degree, I agree. However, there are some things that just cannot be created without oil. Yes, these products are straight up pollutants but they are also the basis of much of what makes up the modern industrialized world. Before oil, the human population of the earth peaked at around 1 billion, then 1.5 billion when we started using coal in industry. Now, it's 6.7 and climbing. These vast amounts of people will not be supported without oil, for better or worse. It's just the truth.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:58 AM
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reply to post by really
 


Yes correct. But there is some good news as I have watched a lot of this stuff for the last 40 years. My dad worked for Socony Mobil.
I worked with electronic and nuclear engineers.
Check out the huge solar grids they are building in the Mojave and Super Conductor companies.
It is going to happen. Good diversification---- some oil, some wind, a little more solar and some technology
Lots of luck shares and Vodka too!



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by Donny 4 million
Check out the huge solar grids they are building in the Mojave and Super Conductor companies.
It is going to happen. Good diversification---- some oil, some wind, a little more solar and some technology


Maybe, you're correct and I am just being overly pessimistic. I just think by the time we start to diversify in earnest it will be too late.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:12 AM
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reply to post by evilcommunist
 


Georgian wine!
I hear it's great.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by really

Originally posted by Donny 4 million
Check out the huge solar grids they are building in the Mojave and Super Conductor companies.
It is going to happen. Good diversification---- some oil, some wind, a little more solar and some technology


Maybe, you're correct and I am just being overly pessimistic. I just think by the time we start to diversify in earnest it will be too late.


Maybe not all we have to do is get the Ugly out of American and the evil out of Communist.
I think that is happening as we speak.



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by Donny 4 million
 


If it was a trolling attempt, it failed. Otherwise I do not see how it is relevant to the subject.

[edit on 6-1-2010 by evilcommunist]



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 11:33 AM
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Originally posted by evilcommunist
reply to post by Donny 4 million
 


If it was a trolling attempt, it failed. Otherwise I do not see how it is relevant to the subject.

[edit on 6-1-2010 by evilcommunist]


Sorry it is my fault. LOl
I went back and looked. I thought you said Apples for gas. Just thought you miss spelled applies.
So I thought why not wine for rubles.




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