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Buddhist style meditation could be offered on UK NHS

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posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 04:41 AM
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This is interesting, a report is claiming that in todays society Buddhist type meditation should be offered to patients. It says thought training is already used for patients of depression and mental illness but that this could be taken further and actual Eastern meditation techniques used.



Meditation should be routinely available on the NHS to treat recurring bouts of depression, a mental health charity has said. The "mindfulness" approach recommended by the Mental Health Foundation incorporates techniques more often associated with eastern philosophy and Buddhist monks than doctors' surgeries.

But a report published by the charity argues that if more GPs could offer the therapy to their patients it would slash the financial burden of depression, which costs the UK economy £7.5 billion a year.




uk.news.yahoo.com...

I think this is an excellent idea, as more people become spiritually aware , as more activate their kundalini more and more spiritual treatments are going to be required. More and more this type of therapy is going to be needed in the NHS (national health service), its not good enough to just say to a patient undergoing a spiritual emergency or a bad kundalini awakening/episode that they are mentally ill/stressed/crazy and to just give anti depressants anymore.




posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 05:10 AM
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I'm of two minds about this. The cynic inside me seeing this as a way of the NHS to cut costs under the guise of religious liberalism. But I agree that alternative medicine has its place in the treatment of some chronic disorders such as depression.

A friend of mine took sedatives for years during a stressful self-reinforcing bout of anxiety and panic disorders. The key, it seems, for him was exercise (I was told why this made sense from a flight-or-fight perspective and release of serotonin).



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 05:13 AM
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I think this is a very positive move by the NHS.

I suffered from depression and a pain related illness for many years, meditation helped me a great deal when used in tandum with medical treatments, it is unlikely i would be here today had I not learnt.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 05:48 AM
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Originally posted by gYvMessanger
I think this is a very positive move by the NHS.


Yes so do I, but it seems at the moment its just a recommendation and not policy. I see no problems with using meditation along side medical treatments as long as the practisers are well trained.


I suffered from depression and a pain related illness for many years, meditation helped me a great deal when used in tandum with medical treatments, it is unlikely i would be here today had I not learnt.


It is rare that this was offered to you as a treatment. You are one of the lucky ones. I wish it had been available for me when I desperatly needed balancing from a spiritual awakening. It was something I didnt even understand at the time and I didnt go to the doctors as I knew theyd put me on some drug of some sort. This hapenned to a member of my family, all they did was give them anti depressants. They are now fine thanks to discovering meditation but they had to do this for themselves . I just wish this was more understood within the NHS, that people have a spirit as well as a body, and some times it is the spirit thats needs helping and not the body.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 06:08 AM
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Originally posted by Mr Green
I see no problems with using meditation along side medical treatments as long as the practisers are well trained.


And preferably trained in Zen! Being repeatedly clubbed in the spine with the keisaku and repeatedly clubbed in the face and head with koans works several wonders for depression. But those who've feigned incapacity will soon regret the day they went to the NHS and said "I'm depressed."

Or will they?



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 06:12 AM
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This seems wonderful, I love Buddhist-related things ever since I was little. I just don't really see a down or negative side to this. Maybe becoming one with nature will help people? who knows? lol



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 06:22 AM
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reply to post by Mr Green
 


It wasnt offered as treatment, my illness made it impossible to work (depression was only part of it), it also made it very difficult to sleep. I would regularly spend several days at a time awake (this lasted a couple of years), whilst awake I was in almost constant pain.

I found that through methods I came to describe as mindful distractiveness I could reduce the torment my body inflicted on me, lower my stress levels, and sleep. Primarily this was a combination of sound therapy and meditation, self administered.

After much personal research I found music / mantra and meditative tehniques which worked for me, I also took more of a hands on approach to my medical treatment, suggesting my own courses of treatment to the doctors and successfully arguing to have my meds changed etc.

Just over a year ago I made an almost complete physical recovery and my mental health is significantly better, something which frankly shocked the health professionals who work with me. Whenever I discuss the case with my doctors (I still visit the hospital for treatment every other month and meet my specialist once a quarter), I make it very clear how I felt the meditation was a important part of the process and I still maintain its important in the ongoing healing (my illness is genetic and I have been very prone to depression).

As my recovery was so significant and unexpected I feel they take this seriously, they at least mark it down when I make the point, though how much policy is influenced by the worker level of the NHS I have no idea.

Oh and I have refused anti-depressenant medication since my first experience with it 8 years ago, that stuff is poison, a lot of Doctors do recognize that. Though I will say there are people who do benefit from short term exposure to it, the pills themselves are not a cure, and most medical professionals know that. Whether they will push them on you or not is a good indication of how in the pocket of Big Pharma your personal doctor is in my opinion.

[edit on 5-1-2010 by gYvMessanger]



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 06:35 AM
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Originally posted by gYvMessanger
reply to post by Mr Green
 



Your case in an excellent example of how meditation really can help a person, even when all else seems not to work. I hope your case is taken seriously within the NHS and it is on file as an example of why meditation should be at least tryed on the NHS.

Those of us who find meditation often take years to do so. Work days are lost and health goes down and stress goes up more as these years pass. If meditation was offered early on a lot of money, pain and wasted time could be saved. I believe society as a whole would be a lot more balanced, happier and healthier.

For every person that finds meditation I bet there are at least 9 that dont.

[edit on 5-1-2010 by Mr Green]



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 06:45 AM
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I was going to say good for the NHS but the heading is misleading. There are no proposals to extend what is already available. This is simply a recommendatiion by a charity.
The proper wording is 'should' not 'could'. A world of difference.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by Cadbury

And preferably trained in Zen! Being repeatedly clubbed in the spine with the keisaku and repeatedly clubbed in the face and head with koans works several wonders for depression. But those who've feigned incapacity will soon regret the day they went to the NHS and said "I'm depressed."

Or will they?


lol well maybe thats a little too much but simple Buddhist techniques like the control of the breath may be slightly more acceptable techniques to use.


The most basic form of meditation involves attending to one's breath.

Begin by sitting in a simple chair, keeping your back erect if you can. The more traditional postures are the lotus position, sitting on a pillow with each foot upon the opposite thigh, and variations such as the half lotus (one foot on the opposite thigh, the other out in front of the opposite knee). This is difficult for many people. Some people kneel, sitting back on their legs or on a pillow between their legs. Many use a meditation bench: kneel, then place a little bench beneath your behind. But meditation is also done while standing, slowly walking, lying on the floor, or even in a recliner!

Traditionally, the hands are placed loosely, palms up, one on top of the other, and with the thumbs lightly touching. This is called the cosmic mudra, one of a large number of symbolic hand positions. You may prefer to lay them flat on your thighs, or any other way that you find comfortable.

Your head should be upright, but not rigid. The eyes may be closed, or focussed on a spot on the ground a couple of feet ahead of you, or looking down at your hands. If you find yourself getting sleepy, keep your eyes open!

Beginning meditators are often asked to count their breath, on the exhale, up to ten. Then you begin back at one. If you loose track, simply go back to one. Your breath should be slow and regular, but not forced or artificially controlled. Just breathe naturally and count.


webspace.ship.edu...

Here is another report from Dec 09 confirming meditation helps improve health www.wildmind.org...


Newer research from the University of Wisconsin shows a meditation habit can strengthen the body’s immune function, plus increase brain performance in the form of electrical activity. It validates the mind-body dynamic of meditation.


This was based on the awarness of breath technique. To validate their findings they measured antibodies in the participants.


[edit on 5-1-2010 by Mr Green]



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by Mr Green
lol well maybe thats a little too much but simple Buddhist techniques like the control of the breath may be slightly better techniques to use.


Aha! But then we'll see the old "yeah, but it took Buddha years and years to reach enlightenment!" crowd and we'll never get these bastards off the sick! No, fellow observer... no. We need all-out monastic conditions, with authentic Japanese Zen masters who aren't afraid to push their student patients right down the awful stairs.

The counting of the breaths you mention is beginner level Zen training, and it's what I started out with.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 07:18 AM
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Originally posted by Cadbury


Aha! But then we'll see the old "yeah, but it took Buddha years and years to reach enlightenment!" crowd and we'll never get these bastards off the sick! No, fellow observer... no. We need all-out monastic conditions, with authentic Japanese Zen masters who aren't afraid to push their student patients right down the awful stairs.

The counting of the breaths you mention is beginner level Zen training, and it's what I started out with.


I dont think the NHS and it patients are ready for Zen masters! Plus I dont think there are enough of them around , even though the control of breath is basic level Zen training would it require a master to teach it? cant simple breath techniques be taught by the not so enlightened !



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 07:53 AM
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Originally posted by Mr Green
I dont think the NHS and it patients are ready for Zen masters!


Not ready? Not ready? Well! They're just about ready then, aren't they?


Plus I dont think there are enough of them around


By the very own nature of their strange business, they would create more of themselves! You'd only need a small handful to begin with.


even though the control of breath is basic level Zen training would it require a master to teach it? cant simple breath techniques be taught by the not so enlightened !


Those techniques could be learnt from books or videos. But this is the NHS, damn it! This is Great Britain! We demand real, actual Japanese!

Shout that out loudly in the streets!




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