It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Dirt on Global Warming

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 09:15 PM
link   
The man made global warming crowd, in their effort to tag every concievable thing that occurs on Earth as somehow causing Global Climate Change, have now turned on dirt as their latest boogeyman.


The New American


Man-made global warming is blamed for a myriad of environmental woes, from floods in Jakarta to drought in Australia, from record highs in Vietnam to snowfall in Baghdad. Global warming's latest crime is allegedly increasing the amount of dust in the Earth's atmosphere.

Robert Boyd with McClatchy Newspapers reports, "As global warming raises temperatures and forests are cleared for agriculture and other development, the amount of dust swirling through the Earth's atmosphere is expected to grow. The likely impact is unknown." Boyd explains dust can be both good and bad for the environment. On one hand, it spreads harmful pollutants and microbes, which can cause or exacerbate heart and lung disease. On the other hand, it carries nutrients needed by marine plants that, in turn, break down carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Additionally, dust has a cooling effect by reflecting heat from the sun. Boyd also quoted a researcher at the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver as crediting windblown dust from Africa as "critical in sustaining vegetation" in parts of North and Central America.

Despite the reported threat of increased atmospheric dust, scientists with the University of Wisconsin-Madison last March reported significant declines recently in airborne dust from Africa. Researchers blamed the lack of dust for 2005's record-breaking string of hurricanes. Less dust translated to more sunlight heating up the ocean, creating ideal conditions for intense hurricanes to form. The study concluded that atmospheric dust and volcanic activity account for 70 percent of warming in the Atlantic Ocean for the past 26 years. The researchers recommended that climate scientists include these variables in climate models to more accurately predict changes in ocean temperatures.

This past fall, it seemed Australia was trying to make up for the lack of atmospheric dust from Africa. But scientists debating the cause of the huge dust storm that hit eastern Australia in September are not in agreement about a link between the disaster and anthropogenic (human-caused) global warming (AGW). The New York Times quoted Andy Pitman, co-director of the Climate Change Research Center in Sydney, saying that record temperatures exacerbating dust storm conditions "cannot be explained without using global warming as a partial cause."

However, Gregory E. Webb with Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, countered, "It seems to be very popular to attribute virtually any modern climatic phenomenon to 'climate change,' or more properly, 'anthropogenic global warming.' However, there is little scientific justification for attributing recent large dust storms in Australia to climate change that relates to human CO2 emissions." Webb pointed out that Australia is one of the driest continents on Earth and is accustomed to severe droughts and dust storms. He cited geological records proving Australia's arid history and equated dust storms in the 1830s and early and mid 1900s with the American Dust Bowl of the 1930s, remarking that those could not have been due to AGW.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


So is this dust good or bad?

On the one hand it gunks up the atmosphere and on the other it keeps the temps down. Could explain the recent cold temps.

Or is MMGW is just a load of bunk?






[edit on 4-1-2010 by FortAnthem]




posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 09:36 AM
link   
I think MMGW is bunk however what they say about airborne dirt is very true. There are islands in the pacific that only grew plants when the dust from asia settled on them. It's an important but overlooked aspect of the global ecosystem. That dust carries nutrients that are essential in many places and our habit of clear cutting forest and other desertification methods are exacerbating the issues. To a degree this may actually be one of the few real anthropogenic causes of atmospheric change.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 02:35 PM
link   

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
I think MMGW is bunk however what they say about airborne dirt is very true. There are islands in the pacific that only grew plants when the dust from asia settled on them. It's an important but overlooked aspect of the global ecosystem. That dust carries nutrients that are essential in many places and our habit of clear cutting forest and other desertification methods are exacerbating the issues. To a degree this may actually be one of the few real anthropogenic causes of atmospheric change.



Seems to me the dust would blow from continent to continent whether humans were around or not.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 02:56 PM
link   
Well, that explains everything... Global Warming causes more dust which causes colder temperatures.


I will agree with Asktheanimals that deforestation and the excessive airborne debris that accompanies it is a problem. I do not think we are creating enough dust or debris to explain the recent cooling. IMO this is nothing more than a desperate attempt to explain away the recent cold weather we have been experiencing in the Northern Hemisphere.

Excessive airborne dust = bad.
Excessive airborne dust ≠ global cooling.

TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 03:04 PM
link   
The Sahara desert blows fine dust into the Atlantic, even as far west as Florida, which results in glorious sunsets.

Scientists have taken core samples from the ocean floor and discovered a distinct pattern of change in the sediment make up approximately every 20,000 years like clockwork.

Further evidence found in the fossil record and satellite imaging of the Sahara shows that the desert switches between bone dry and lush green every 20,000 years in conjunction with a regular slight wobble in the earths axis.

The last green phase was aproximately 5,000 years ago. During the green phase the Sahara is home to a network of mega-lakes and rivers that make up the largest concentration of fresh water on the planet.

The transformation from lush green to bone dry occurs within a century or two!

www.history.com...

This is all presented in this new episode of "How the Earth was Made" that just aired a few weeks ago.




Africa's Sahara Desert is the size of the United States, making it the largest desert in the world. It's also the hottest place on the planet. But now an astonishing series of geological discoveries has revealed this searing wasteland hides a dramatically different past. Scientists have unearthed the fossils of whales, freshwater shells and even ancient human settlements. All clues to a story that would alter the course of human evolution and culminate in biggest climate change event of the last 10,000 years.



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 10:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by FortAnthem

Originally posted by Asktheanimals
I think MMGW is bunk however what they say about airborne dirt is very true. There are islands in the pacific that only grew plants when the dust from asia settled on them. It's an important but overlooked aspect of the global ecosystem. That dust carries nutrients that are essential in many places and our habit of clear cutting forest and other desertification methods are exacerbating the issues. To a degree this may actually be one of the few real anthropogenic causes of atmospheric change.



Seems to me the dust would blow from continent to continent whether humans were around or not.


What I'm saying is that when we clear off land we create opportunities for topsoil to be lost to air currents as well as erosion. It will benefit some areas while hurting others but we have little or no idea of what the end results will be.



new topics

top topics
 
4

log in

join