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Thousands of dead octopuses wash up on Portugal beach

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posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 07:50 AM
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Not Sure how relevant this is but i live south of portugal in gibraltar a small british colony south spain.
and Yes we have experience some serious storms here some breaking all time records.
Something is happening just this morning we experienced yet another massive super storm and to my surprise the whole sky turned orange. Not exactly sure what caused this, possibly a red sprite? or was it dust - iron ??? i dont know i hope someone can enlighten me as to what the hell made the whole sky turn orange during this thundertorm




posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 07:59 AM
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I don't know if it's related to this or not, but today I saw the biggest flock of seagulls (not the 80s band
) that I have ever seen, with probably around 100 seagulls.

Here in Portugal we have a saying that is something like "seagulls on land, storm at sea", so that may mean more bad weather on the Atlantic.

Another thing that I do not know if it's related or not, the bad weather we are having at the moment is not the type of weather that we usually have in winter, this is mostly made from large cumulus clouds, with lightning storms and a relatively high air temperature, the type of storm we have in April or May.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 08:13 AM
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Today, Cracked had an article about odd animal behavior, and in there is a report of squid beaching in CA

I don't know what is going on either...no theories...just trying to help a bit.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 08:13 AM
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HARRP, Chemtrails ect ect. man made weather and interference is my guess.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 10:33 AM
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Space cadet (who posted here) alerted us to this octopus phenomenon on another thread, where we were discussing the recent whale beachings in the New Zealand region. I mentioned observing that such beachings in that region seem to occur within a few days before a major seismic event (ie earthquake), and referred specifically to beachings before the big quake/tsunami in 2004 and also the more recent quake/tsunami in the Solomon islands. So I suggested that the latest beaching of whales could be an indicator of an upcoming event.

Yesterday, there was a mag 7.2 quake in the Solomon Islands...

Is there a link? Maybe. Whales apparently have the ability to navigate by geomagnetic detection, and so do some other mammals and also birds. If there is major enough disturbance of the geomagnetic field in their region, they can get confused. And also, they hear noises (from seismic activity) and if the noises are loud enough (but still sub-sonic to us), that could literally drive them out of the water to get away from it. Major quakes are known to sometimes produce or be preceded by geomagnetic anomalies, and they also produce very loud, low-frequency sounds. The latest quake in the Solomon Islands was on a subduction zone (like the one in Banda Aceh, 2004), and I expect it could get pretty loud when the ground moves like that.

Back to the octopuses (or octopi). I am not so familiar with these creatures' sensing abilities, but I was under the impression that they are pretty hardy and canny and seem able to find places to hide out if the weather goes bad. So -- was it a toxic substance in the water? That would take a huge amount of whatever substance it was, in moving seawater. But it's possible. Was it a sudden change in water temperature? I don't know and I doubt if that would kill them. I've seen octopuses that have been pulled from the water and the change in temperature from the coolish sea to warmer air didn't kill them. Some even crawled away and dived back in.


Did they pick up a disease or get parasitic infections? Yes, that's possible too, of course. Few living creatures of any complexity are entirely immune to diseases and attack by parasites. So that could be what happened. Still weird though.

Or, did they get affected by a geomagnetic change? I dunno, but I do know there are lot more quakes in and around Europe than USGS shows on their precious maps. (They don't even show all the main ones that occur in Canada!) So, perhaps it was a quake or possibly it was undersea volcanic activity. They might have got "cooked"! Not literally, but their water might have just go too hot for them to remain viable. After all, there is a lot more volcanic activity under the seas than on dry land.

Does it portend anything? I really have no idea. Just throwing out some ideas, that's all.

Mike

(Edited to fix the mass of typos. I was hurrying to get off to work when I posted.)

[edit on 4/1/10 by JustMike]



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 12:25 PM
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I would like to point out that Octopi (that is the correct term btw) are the most intelligent invertebrates on the planet. They have a superior neural network that span throughout their entire body. The most important thing to note is they have an exceptional learning curve when it comes to interacting with and navigating their environment.

My guess is it was something annoying that drew them out of the sea. As mollusks they are very susceptible to chemical changes, if pollution was the cause, we would probably observe more die offs under water than beaching.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 01:11 PM
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Another important fact: there was a 6.1 earthquake SW of Portugal about one or two weeks ago. the fault there is capable of producing historically 9.0 earthquakes and devastating Atlantic tsunamis (last one was in 1755)

About the storms: this winter, the jet stream (which defines the usual flux of storms) is more south than normal. That is not the norm, but it's also not that rare.
Sometimes it happens, like in the stormy winter of 2000 in Portugal. when, that happens, Portugal gets the stormy weather, and Europe more freezing weather and snows. Likely this winter will be VERY COLD.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 01:51 PM
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Maybe "The Bloop" is on the move.
Personally, I am leaning toward something "chemical".



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by DaMod
 

Thank you for the info. Appreciate it.
I knew they were canny creatures but what you mentioned about their learning ability is interesting.

Would you be able to tell us if octopi are particularly sensitive to sound, perhaps in the subsonic range? Or to geomagnetic effects?

Another query which might sound odd but I think you'll get my drift: does a dead octopus sink, or float? The alternatives for what happened strongly depend on knowing that. I could hunt the web but I'd rather ask someone who clearly knows a bit about them.

Many thanks,

Mike

reply to post by segurelha
 

That's an important point, that there was a fairly significant quake in the general region. True, not real close to where the octopi went ashore, but it could be a factor depending on things like current drift effects, or even sound/geomagnetic effects (depending on what octopi can sense).

About this quake your mentioned: I couldn't recall a mag 6.1 in the region so I checked the EMSC data base, going back several days. The closest I could find in location and mag. was a 5.5 on the SW Iberian margin on Dec 17. Is this the one, do you think? It bang on the fault liner there and so it's possible it was originally published as a 6.1 and then got downgraded. Often happens, as I expect you know. Data page and links for maps at the EMSC are here.

For anyone who's confused by this discussion of quakes, they, along with sub-sea volcanics, can play havoc with sea fauna. Right now we're just looking for reasons why these octopi came ashore, and in a region with an active under-sea fault line it's worth investigating.

Regards,

Mike



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 03:52 PM
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As I am not sure if all people are aware of it, I would like to say that the octopuses were all dead when they appeared on the beach.
 

It looks like there's the possibility of a virus being the responsible for the death of the octopuses, and while they are waiting for the results of the tests being done in Lisbon, the local authorities are going to contact the Vigo University (in Spain, just a little north of that area) because they have been studying that species.

Two other things appeared on that beach: a dead dolphin (that was dead for a relatively long time and is not considered related to the dead octopuses) and a shoe with a foot inside!


The police is investigating this last finding.

PS: my source for the above information was the Portuguese newspaper Publico.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 03:57 PM
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Originally posted by JustMike
The closest I could find in location and mag. was a 5.5 on the SW Iberian margin on Dec 17. Is this the one, do you think?
That's the one, and as usual, the USGS shows a different value when compared with the Portuguese Geophysics Institute, according to them it was a 6.0.

Sorry for the possible off-topic.



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by Whateva69
 


i was told it may well have been a red sprite triigered during the storm



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 10:28 AM
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I for one think there's something fishy going on under the oceans that the majority of us don't know and can't know about.

I'm also a believer in the theory that there are thousands of miles of tunnels that have been drilled underground by TPTB. We know they are there but we don't know how far they reach or where to/from.

If some of these tunnels lead to and from oceanic entry and exit points, then where these are is maybe where these problems are created.

Huge holes in rock that are created by BLASTING because the huge tunnel boring machines cannot work submerged in water. The last few metres would be created the old fashioned way with explosive charges which are what causes the marine life mass-killings.

Just a thought.



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 12:08 PM
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reply to post by JustMike
 


Well, I know there was a study done on that very thing. They set it up so that the octopi would associate sound (within ranges of 50 - 100hz) at a low frequency with an electric shock. This was to test their sensitivity. Yes they are very sensitive to low frequency sound.

As far as we (humans) know, they are not overly sensitive to magnetic fluctuations.

This really doesn't explain why they would beach themselves though. If it where due to low frequency sound we would see octopi beachings a lot more (generally every time there is an earthquake at sea).

Here are some octopus facts. Some might help, others are just useless tidbits.

Did you know that Octopi can taste with their tentacles?

You might find it strange that they have a rectangle pupil with a retina containing 20 million photoreceptors. They see at 10 fps more than the human eye. Octopi can perceive shape, color intensity and texture. Another difference is that the eye of the octopus have no blind spot because the nerve cells leave from the outside of the eyeball.

Did you know Octopi have the most complex brain of any invertebrate? Their brains are estimated to hold about 300 million neurons. The human brain has from 10 billion to 100 billion neurons. A dog's brain only contains 160 Million Neurons.

Recap:

A Human Brain: 10-100 Billion Neurons
A Dog's Brain: 160 Million Neurons
A Octopus's Brain: 300 Million Neurons

And you thought Fido was clever...

Actually, here is a paper written in the Journal of Experimental Biology that I read a while back. It is basically about Octopi respiration. It is PDF format.

PDF

Octopi are very sensitive to chemicals in the water. In fact some species actually have chemical receptors on their tentacles. (namely E. dolfeini) High enough pollution levels will kill, so I doubt pollution was the cause. They do however avoid polluted areas whenever possible. (So don't rule it out)

I don't think it is due to a virus either. We need to really monitor habitat and start paying closer attention to what is going on.



[edit on 8-1-2010 by DaMod]



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by whoshotJR
reply to post by captiva
 


I think you are correct.

Sea lions disappear in CA also in CA they have a massive amount of fin whales that are now in the area. It seems all over the world there has been stories like these lately.

My thought is that the climate change is effecting the life in the water more then above with changes in the worlds ocean currents and just the wildlife in generals food supply. This is caused by the massive amounts of ice that have been breaking apart or melting in the North and South and the increase in storms.


Who knows though


I also wouldn't be surprised if we have some huge quakes.

[edit on 3-1-2010 by whoshotJR]


The sea lions didn't disappear, they relocated.

What is your source for changes in worlds ocean currents?

Where is the massive breaking and melting of ice occurring in the south?

[edit on 8-1-2010 by Deny Arrogance]



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 12:27 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
I don't know if it's related to this or not, but today I saw the biggest flock of seagulls (not the 80s band
) that I have ever seen, with probably around 100 seagulls.

Here in Portugal we have a saying that is something like "seagulls on land, storm at sea", so that may mean more bad weather on the Atlantic.

Another thing that I do not know if it's related or not, the bad weather we are having at the moment is not the type of weather that we usually have in winter, this is mostly made from large cumulus clouds, with lightning storms and a relatively high air temperature, the type of storm we have in April or May.



Did you run? Run so far away? Did you try to get away.....

I would love to go there someday, looks beautiful and the people seem very nice and open. I wonder if we are seeing changes in the way the oceans currents run and that's the effects you are starting to see, it would effect weather also and animals.



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 12:53 PM
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Out of curiosity I did some research on octopus markets. The 2008 figure is 44,7000 tonnes of imports for Japan alone.

www.eurofish.dk...



By comparison this event is a drop in the bucket at 1200 lbs total.


Still a mystery that needs investigation but hardly the eco-disaster that is being hyped.

[edit on 8-1-2010 by Deny Arrogance]



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by ArMaP
As I am not sure if all people are aware of it, I would like to say that the octopuses were all dead when they appeared on the beach.
 

It looks like there's the possibility of a virus being the responsible for the death of the octopuses, and while they are waiting for the results of the tests being done in Lisbon, the local authorities are going to contact the Vigo University (in Spain, just a little north of that area) because they have been studying that species.

Two other things appeared on that beach: a dead dolphin (that was dead for a relatively long time and is not considered related to the dead octopuses) and a shoe with a foot inside!


The police is investigating this last finding.

PS: my source for the above information was the Portuguese newspaper Publico.


Hi ArMap

Holy moly!!! 100 octopi and 801 feet.

Do you know if there are off shore islands? Octopi like cover like in reefs. There can be no reefs on west coasts. Their habitat should have incorporated some kind of cover. Kelp maybe? Rocks?
Any rivers around with paper mills? The bodies of the neat little guys did not seem to be unhealthy or mutated.
Is a sprite like a red tide? Would not a pollutant have taken out other species. Maybe it did but they didn't wash up. Usually disabled marine life is gobbled up by something.
Where were the FISH?

I'll guess viral for the moment.
Shark for the foot.
Dolphin could have dined on Octopuses

No need to answer this ramble. Donny

[edit on 8-1-2010 by Donny 4 million]



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 03:03 PM
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Originally posted by Deny Arrogance


The sea lions didn't disappear, they relocated.

What is your source for changes in worlds ocean currents?

Where is the massive breaking and melting of ice occurring in the south?

[edit on 8-1-2010 by Deny Arrogance]


Where did they relocate to?

The change in the ocean currents is my own theory. It's also been said that changes in the temp of the oceans could effect the current currents.

Here are some links for you on Glaciers and Ice melting in the south.

www.grida.no...

abccarbon.com...

www.usatoday.com...

news.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Jan, 8 2010 @ 03:50 PM
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I heard a story in the news last week that 1700 sea lions left San Diego
pier #39 where they had been living for twenty years. They started leaving at Thanksgiving time. Maybe volcanic vents are opeing up in the ocean's floor. Or an earth quake is comming. Some other science show I was watching said that the oceans were warmer during the last ice age than they are now. If the temperature of the water changes the fish will relocate or die. If they go to deeper levels of water there may not be enough oxygen for them and they die, this happens in the summer in South Carolina. You'll see dead fish in July when it's 90-115 degrees.




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