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World end date 23rd December 2012

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posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 08:40 AM
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I have been reading a great book called Fingerprints of the gods by Graham Hancock.

In this book it is claimed that the Mayan Calender of dots and lines was infact invented by the Olmec's and that the end of the world date is the 23rd of December 2012.

I have read on this site the the Mayan calender ends of the 21st of December 2012.

So if the Mayan calender was really that of the Olmec's, why is there a two day gap inbetween the end of the earth, or the end of the 5th phase of the sun.

Did the Maya take the Olmec calender and improve it ???

Can anyone shed light on this ????

Thanks


[edit on 3-1-2010 by colec156]




posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 09:58 AM
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its actualy between 21st-23rd, winter solicist (sp). The sun goes down a few degrees and then a few days later comes back up from the lowest point.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by colec156
 


The reason for the inconsistency is that none of it is vaguely true...



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by seethelight
reply to post by colec156
 


The reason for the inconsistency is that none of it is vaguely true...


What exactly are you saying is untrue? The Mayan calendar itself?

The reason for the discrepancies is pretty simple. In order to figure out when the calendar was started -- needed in order to ascertain the date in which it ended -- they have to calibrate the time frames on the Mayan calendar to our current calendar. This does not always work out exactly even and depending on whom was doing the research, their method for calibration may be slightly different.

For example, in order for our calendar to stay accurate, we have to eliminate one day from it every 400 years. The problem of course being that we then remove an entire 24 hours from our calendar and it doesn't quite sync up. It does over the average of the timeframe -- but not everyday is going to be exactly on the mark. It does come as close as possible. However, it is not "by the second" exact, so when you start pulling days out somewhere in the middle of the 400-year cycle, sometimes its off. When trying to then figure out the date range for a calendar started in 3000 BCE (approx), those "seconds" of being off tend to add up. Hence, why the closest we can come is a 1 - 3 day estimate.

I'm not sure if I got my point across or not -- sorry if it's a little confusing.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:26 AM
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Originally posted by lpowell0627

Originally posted by seethelight
reply to post by colec156
 


The reason for the inconsistency is that none of it is vaguely true...


What exactly are you saying is untrue? The Mayan calendar itself?

The reason for the discrepancies is pretty simple. In order to figure out when the calendar was started -- needed in order to ascertain the date in which it ended -- they have to calibrate the time frames on the Mayan calendar to our current calendar. This does not always work out exactly even and depending on whom was doing the research, their method for calibration may be slightly different.

For example, in order for our calendar to stay accurate, we have to eliminate one day from it every 400 years. The problem of course being that we then remove an entire 24 hours from our calendar and it doesn't quite sync up. It does over the average of the timeframe -- but not everyday is going to be exactly on the mark. It does come as close as possible. However, it is not "by the second" exact, so when you start pulling days out somewhere in the middle of the 400-year cycle, sometimes its off. When trying to then figure out the date range for a calendar started in 3000 BCE (approx), those "seconds" of being off tend to add up. Hence, why the closest we can come is a 1 - 3 day estimate.

I'm not sure if I got my point across or not -- sorry if it's a little confusing.


The Mayans never predicted the end of the world...

As that's the case none of the speculation is meaningful or true.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:33 AM
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reply to post by colec156
 


Well I'm sure someone will tell you, or may have already by the time I submit this post, is the fact that the Mayan calender doesn't end, but restarts on 2012...but that does that really make one ounce of a difference? No...it doesn't...no significance at all...the significance is when the mysterious and complex calendar reaches its end...whether it starts again or not...sorry for rambling on and not really answering your question...but you may also find this thread I just made interesting.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by lpowell0627
 


Thanks for your reply.
It has really help me understand and even though the answer was pretty simple


Why is it, sometimes the most simple of things are right there in front of you but for a while no matter what you do, you just don't see the answer.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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reply to post by CHA0S
 


reading something into a calendar doesn't make it true...

there is NO REASON to think ANYTHING is gonna happen in Dec of 2012... unless one of you loonies makes something happen...



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by seethelight


The Mayans never predicted the end of the world...

As that's the case none of the speculation is meaningful or true.


No, but like the Olmec's they predict the end of the sun's 5th phase.
Maybe folk law, maybe superstition, maybe truth.

I'm sure if nothing happens, in a 1000 years time our ancestors will laugh at some of our stories, maybe even stories that actually happened and were fact.

Just like some stories of the past that we rubbish today without ever thinking it could of happened.

BTW, I'm not saying that some stories of the past of taken as complete truth I am just making a point.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by CHA0S
 


Thanks for that CHA0S.
A very interesting read there.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 10:53 AM
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Originally posted by seethelight
reply to post by CHA0S
 


reading something into a calendar doesn't make it true...

there is NO REASON to think ANYTHING is gonna happen in Dec of 2012... unless one of you loonies makes something happen...



one of you loonies, well what a clever reply. Maybe something will happen, maybe something won't. But to call someone a loony just because they have a difference of opinion is a little out of order.

BTW, this thread I started was about the discretion between the Mayan and Olmec calender. Not that I 100% believe something will end the world.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 12:22 PM
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I don't know about 3 days.

But often talk about the last 2 days. Which means this, one day on earth is always divided in two. Cause of the rotation of the earth.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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Somewhere in the timeframe between December 21, 2012 - December 23, 2012. A few days off is not that bad.

Thought December 21-23, in my opinion, is just a new a beginning and a new age.

[edit on 3-1-2010 by sphinx551]



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 01:52 PM
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The Mayans have said themselves that 2012 is not the end of the world. It's a time where there calender finishes and a "new age" begins.

The Video says, "mayan shaman", but he is in fact much more than this. There are over 400 Mayan tribes still around in South America, (guatemala,Belize,Mexico) and this guy is the head elder of all of them.




posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by grantbeed
 


Great vid thanks,
But it does raise the uncomfortable question that again the Mayan calender was invented by the Olmec's. Well according to some sources.

Apparently the Mayan's dispute this.
Anyways. Thanks for all the replies.



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