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Quake Watch 2010

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posted on Nov, 8 2010 @ 08:16 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


um no not yet - got any spare time you can lend me? - it's a long read - printed it out though. Alot of other information to wrap my brain arount at the moment, and this would make so much more - but couldn't help a quick look see. From the brief look see - appears to me that a few of us here have already thought this - just at brief glance (really 2 minutes for 30 pages) (the maps drew me in :-) - did I mention I love maps and graphs :-)).




posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 03:23 AM
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Still haven't re read the surge tectonics paper again. I hope I will get some time later tonight when all is quiet. It's a bit complex for my limited understanding so I really appreciate you both taking the time to read it.

Nevertheless, my brain refuses to shut up and I've been thinking about atmospheric science. This may be a bit 'out there' but if you think about 'as above, so below' is it possible that similar movements of magma/gasses could happen below us as the effects of the ITCZ or high and low pressure systems and other means of circulations but below the crust? The centrifugal force must have some effect surely? Yes the sun is related to our atmospheric processes, but the inner core of the earth could also be related in a similar way. In other words, could the fluids and gasses below the crust be controlled by similar forces as fluids and gasses on the surface?
Is this making any sense?



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 03:28 AM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Not quite hanging by the toes, but thanks for the laugh! Yep, I are half a world away from you by the looks of it, in a very BORING part of the world as far as tectonics and seismicity is concerned.



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 05:51 AM
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reply to post by zenius
 


You can't get any more 'boring' or I prefer 'safe' than Ireland where we have an earthquake once every blue moon or less and the only plates around here are the ones in the kitchen.

You are more likely to get tremors from the black stuff!



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 06:15 AM
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reply to post by zenius
 



FINAL ANSWER: 1 cubic foot of air at standard temperature and pressure assuming average composition weighs approximately 0.0807 lbs.


Source

This is something that I pointed out somewhere on the Yellowstone thread - you will never find it now - that the air above the land has and effect.

This page talks about air density and pressure and if you ignore the psi and only use the 0 column you can see that the density changes with temperature. It also changes with barometric pressure.

This page has a simple (simplistic?) explanation of changes due to barometric pressure. It uses millibars but these days you will see that as hPa (hectoPascals) - same thing.

A little more reading on air pressure as related to earth. There are several pages but just keep on reading as in some way or another it is all relevant to earthquakes and anyway it is interesting.

This page is another version of that on one page. Note that they mention 'scientists' using kPa (kiloPascals). Don't get confused! Weather men (that's people) use hPa just to confuse the scientists.

By now you should be gagging for the Wikipedia article on atmospheric pressure!

You should have enough information now to do various calculations to show that the atmospheric pressure actually causes a difference of many thousands of tons over an area. Yes it must have an effect on earthquakes - shallow ones anyway as the ground is being depressed and released as the air column changes, there is pressure (additional) from the wind as well and we know that show on siesmos. We say - nothing to worry about, only wind. But always remember that if it shows on the siesmo it IS shaking the ground albeit only a little.



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Well Australia is probably just as boring as Ireland, so to make up for it I live in an extinct volcanic area. That's the best I can do and it's what go me started about hot spot theory and that it was rubbish.

Thanks for taking the time to put up the links for atmospheric pressure, although I have studied it and have an ok grasp of it. Funny though I never thought of it as influencing earthquake activity. But I wasn't studying geology then. Thanks for pointing out that link.

What I was trying to get at though, was the systems and processes below the biosphere/hydrosphere & lithosphere and could they be similar to those above? Eg, is the centrifugal force relative to equatorial magma and gas movement. I would have thought it would but on the surface there is no visual sign that it does except with Indonesia (5.2 Java just now while typing) but that theory doesnt hold for the rest of the planet.



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 06:59 AM
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== PRELIMINARY EARTHQUAKE REPORT ==



Region: JAVA, INDONESIA
Geographic coordinates: 7.885S, 107.246E
Magnitude: 5.2 Mb
Depth: 69 km
Universal Time (UTC): 9 Nov 2010 12:38:59
Time near the Epicenter: 9 Nov 2010 19:38:59
Local standard time in your area: 9 Nov 2010 23:08:59

Location with respect to nearby cities:
110 km (68 miles) SSW (199 degrees) of Bandung, Java, Indonesia
117 km (73 miles) SSE (157 degrees) of Sukabumi, Java, Indonesia
128 km (80 miles) WSW (241 degrees) of Tasikmalaya, Java, Indonesia
202 km (126 miles) SSE (164 degrees) of JAKARTA, Java, Indonesia


ADDITIONAL EARTHQUAKE PARAMETERS
________________________________
event ID : US c000087d

This event has been reviewed by a seismologist at NEIC For subsequent updates, maps, and technical information, see:
earthquake.usgs.gov...
or
earthquake.usgs.gov...

National Earthquake Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
neic.usgs.gov...


DISCLAIMER: sslearthquake.usgs.gov...


Just noticed another one earlier today:


Magnitude 5.4 - JAVA, INDONESIA
2010 November 09 07:03:31 UTC

Versión en Español

* Details
* Summary
* Maps
* Scientific & Technical
* Tsunami

Earthquake Details

* This event has been reviewed by a seismologist.

Magnitude 5.4
Date-Time

* Tuesday, November 09, 2010 at 07:03:31 UTC
* Tuesday, November 09, 2010 at 02:03:31 PM at epicenter
* Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 8.597°S, 110.119°E
Depth 75.6 km (47.0 miles)
Region JAVA, INDONESIA
Distances

* 94 km (58 miles) SSW (199°) from Yogyakarta, Java, Indonesia
* 186 km (115 miles) SSW (192°) from Semarang, Java, Indonesia
* 197 km (122 miles) SSE (164°) from Pekalongan, Java, Indonesia
* 462 km (287 miles) SE (127°) from JAKARTA, Java, Indonesia

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 13.3 km (8.3 miles); depth +/- 0.9 km (0.6 miles)
Parameters NST= 87, Nph= 90, Dmin=87.9 km, Rmss=1.13 sec, Gp= 43°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=9
Source

* USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)

Event ID usc000086d

Certainly alot going on there right now.
edit on 9-11-2010 by zenius because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-11-2010 by zenius because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 07:14 AM
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Originally posted by zenius
reply to post by PuterMan
 


Well Australia is probably just as boring as Ireland, so to make up for it I live in an extinct volcanic area. That's the best I can do and it's what go me started about hot spot theory and that it was rubbish.


Newer Volcanics Area then? 5000 years does not make it extinct, only dormant and only yesterday I was reading some Australian article winding people up about the dangers it poses.


Thanks for taking the time to put up the links for atmospheric pressure, although I have studied it and have an ok grasp of it.


Apologies, one never quite knows the level of knowledge of a participant. I hope someone else will find it informative.


What I was trying to get at though, was the systems and processes below the biosphere/hydrosphere & lithosphere and could they be similar to those above? Eg, is the centrifugal force relative to equatorial magma and gas movement. I would have thought it would but on the surface there is no visual sign that it does except with Indonesia (5.2 Java just now while typing) but that theory doesnt hold for the rest of the planet.


The effect of centrifugal force/centripetal force or whatever it is called these days is minimal. (less than 0.5% of the weight component) this file (PPT) gives the calculation towards the end. If you don't want to download the PPT, this link should give you the cached HTML version.

There is supposedly circulation in the Mantle (Linky for those who need more info) but let's face it ANY info as regards what goes on down there is actually theory, hypothesis or BS because they don't actually know. Don't get me started on the earth's core!!!!!
edit on 9/11/2010 by PuterMan because: OK, I am fed up with giving you reasons. I just wanted to edit it. Right? Stop hassling me!




posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 07:18 AM
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and then

5.2 2010/11/09 12:39:00 -7.885 107.246 69.7 JAVA, INDONESIA
5.1 2010/11/09 11:16:50 -1.875 99.164 45.1 KEPULAUAN MENTAWAI REGION, INDONESIA



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 07:31 AM
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reply to post by Anmarie96
 


I have it on good authority that you are somewhat partial to graphs and charts so I thought you might like this one.

You see aside from the little spike at the start of the current episode, the activity at Indonesia is as it always is which includes the days after the 'big event'.



Here is the last month just for comparison and to show the spike in more detail.



And the magnitudes:


edit on 9/11/2010 by PuterMan because:




posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 

zenius, I take it you live in Queensland then?

Seen a TV show the other week , a Outback Vets and their rescue stories, they were zooming over to Queenland for a story about a swan or goose or some kind of bird and in the aerial shot over the landscape there were volcano cones everywhere

Something I want to look into, any web links?
edit on 9-11-2010 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 02:22 PM
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Today’s Earthquake Fact
More damage was done by the resulting fire after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake than by the earthquake itself.



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 


I was actually just thinking of this last night! I'm in Brisbane and I could have sworn not too long ago I heard stories about. big volcano in maybe Rocky? this the one you're talking about?



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 04:47 PM
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Oh, come on Puterman, I'd love to start you on the Earth's core!

I haven't heard of any Australian volcanoes that may be 'rocky'. Mt Gambia in South Australia they tell us is the most recently active one (4,500 years).
The volcanic cones are near Brisbane and called the Glass House Mountains:

Glass House Mountains National Park is a national park in Queensland (Australia), 70 km (43 mi) northeast of Brisbane. It consists of a flat plain punctuated by rhyolite and trachyte volcanic plugs, the cores of extinct volcanoes that formed 27 million to 26 million years ago.[1][2] The mountains would once have had pyroclastic exteriors, but these have eroded away.

en.wikipedia.org...
This is the area where I live.

The Atherton Tablelands west of Cairns has a few extinct volcanoes also which were active around 12000 years ago..

Then there's Mt Warning a couple of hundred kilometers away in New South Wales:

Mount Warning is the central volcanic remnant of an ancient shield volcano, the Tweed Volcano, which would have been about 1,900 m (6,200 ft) above sea level or just under twice the height of the current mountain.[4] This volcano erupted around 23 million years ago.[5] As the mountain's central vent cooled it shrank, forming a depression at the top that has greatly eroded.[4]
en.wikipedia.org...

These are probably the most notable areas in and around Queensland, but there are more: en.wikipedia.org...
Look at this list and tell me that Australia travelled over a hotspot causing most of the eastern Australian volcanoes from north to south and that the same hot spot is currently in Bass Strait.....that's what is is written about on Glass house Mountains information boards.

edit on 9-11-2010 by zenius because: oops



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 04:56 PM
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reply to post by bkaust
 


I think I found the one you may have heard about, it's in Victoria near Ballerat:
www.thecourier.com.au...

That's interesting as volcanos were almost a non topic when I lived in Victoria. I guess it's not too far from Bass Strait though. Maybe there is a connection after all



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by zenius

I haven't heard of any Australian volcanoes that may be 'rocky'. Mt Gambia in South Australia they tell us is the most recently active one (4,500 years).
The volcanic cones are near Brisbane and called the Glass House Mountains:

Glass House Mountains National Park is a national park in Queensland (Australia), 70 km (43 mi) northeast of Brisbane. It consists of a flat plain punctuated by rhyolite and trachyte volcanic plugs, the cores of extinct volcanoes that formed 27 million to 26 million years ago.[1][2] The mountains would once have had pyroclastic exteriors, but these have eroded away.

en.wikipedia.org...
This is the area where I live.


Thats the place I seen on the TV


This exact shot is what I saw
upload.wikimedia.org...

I don't know about passing over a hot spot, but if you look on Google Earth at the area between Australia and to the East of New Zealand you can see where the old Pacific Plate/Australian Plate margin was at one time = "the Coleville Ridge" 2nd one in from the Kermadec Trench/Ridge (todays margin), then even further in there is the big crack and ridge that runs up from Cape Reianga, NZ through Norfolk island to New Caledonia, perhaps an even older margin, so there is every possiblity the oldest margin was in fact the Australian East coast, parallel to where those volcanos are.
Just a theory
edit on 9-11-2010 by muzzy because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-11-2010 by muzzy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by muzzy
 
That picture is beautiful
nuf said



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by zenius
 


I meant rockhampton, sorry I assumed if you were a Queenslander you would know the abbreviation. (that's not meant to come across bi***y btw :p) I'm sure I read something about one, I'll have to do a search when I'm online next!



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by zenius
reply to post by bkaust
 


I think I found the one you may have heard about, it's in Victoria near Ballerat:
www.thecourier.com.au...

That's interesting as volcanos were almost a non topic when I lived in Victoria. I guess it's not too far from Bass Strait though. Maybe there is a connection after all


yeah, I've read up about that one too, I was surprised when I first hear about it! you dont think 'volcano' when you hear Victoria!



posted on Nov, 9 2010 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by bkaust
 



yeah, I've read up about that one too, I was surprised when I first hear about it! you dont think 'volcano' when you hear Victoria!


I don't think volcano when I hear Australia, let alone Victoria! In fact today I have been enlightened.

So, when is it gonna blow then?




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