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Quake Watch 2010

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posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 08:13 AM
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4.4 in New Zealand

Universal Time July 26 2010 at 13:02
NZ Standard Time Tuesday, July 27 2010 at 1:02 am
Latitude, Longitude 46.25°S, 166.01°E
Focal Depth 20 km
Richter magnitude 4.4
Region Fiordland
Location

* 130 km west of Tuatapere
* 150 km west of Otautau
* 180 km west of Invercargill
* 350 km west of Dunedin


www.geonet.org.nz...




posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 09:51 AM
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Have you folks realized that the quakes - while smaller are rolling around again just as they did last week before the 3 7's.
.

Muzzy & Puterman - Great job on the graphs, please keep up the good work. I Wish I had time to help you two but my schedule is not allowing any extra research at the moment
.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 12:48 PM
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reply to post by Anmarie96
 


Thanks anmarie96

What I need most is background info on the quakes that don't have any info.
200 word or less descriptions of what happened

Regarding the numbers per year, I'd like to know what criteria USGS used to compile those graphs earthquake.usgs.gov... ie what type of magnitude they used, because I am half way through updating 2005 and I have 19 quakes above 7, not 11 that usgs have.
I picked the extra 8 up from their own site, on this page earthquake.usgs.gov...

that page is off earthquake.usgs.gov...

like I say they need to say what parameters they use.

I have checked a couple of years of the Chinese data and what they put in as eg 7.0Ms cross checks with usgs and emsc etc as 6.8's and 6.9's so they don't make the list.

You have to draw the line somewhere and in this project the line is, if 3 out of 4 sources say 6.8 and one says 7.0 then it doesn't make the grade.

When its all done and we get back to 3000BC, I might start again and do the same for "Strong" quakes ie 6.0-6.9

They can kill as many people and cause as much damage as the 7.0's if they hit the wrong spot.



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 06:55 PM
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Okay folks, here we go - hold on

Magnitude 5.7
Date-Time Monday, July 26, 2010 at 23:06:50 UTC
Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 07:06:50 AM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 6.636°N, 123.198°E
Depth 625.9 km (388.9 miles)
Region MORO GULF, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES
Distances 130 km (80 miles) ESE of Zamboanga, Mindanao, Philippines
135 km (80 miles) WSW of Cotabato, Mindanao, Philippines
135 km (85 miles) SSW of Pagadian, Mindanao, Philippines
915 km (570 miles) SSE of MANILA, Philippines

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 13.7 km (8.5 miles); depth +/- 9.6 km (6.0 miles)
Parameters NST= 65, Nph= 74, Dmin=267.2 km, Rmss=1.22 sec, Gp= 40°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)


Event ID us2010zeb6

and then

Date-Time Monday, July 26, 2010 at 23:19:15 UTC
Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 11:19:15 AM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 24.462°S, 177.046°W
Depth 91.4 km (56.8 miles)
Region SOUTH OF THE FIJI ISLANDS
Distances 415 km (255 miles) SSW of NUKU`ALOFA, Tonga
455 km (280 miles) SSE of Ndoi Island, Fiji
540 km (335 miles) N of Raoul Island, Kermadec Islands
1575 km (980 miles) NNE of Auckland, New Zealand

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 24.7 km (15.3 miles); depth +/- 10.8 km (6.7 miles)
Parameters NST= 41, Nph= 41, Dmin=537.7 km, Rmss=0.91 sec, Gp= 97°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)


Event ID us2010zeca


and then

Magnitude 5.5
Date-Time Monday, July 26, 2010 at 23:31:05 UTC
Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 08:31:05 AM at epicenter

Location 38.993°N, 142.246°E
Depth 17.9 km (11.1 miles)
Region NEAR THE EAST COAST OF HONSHU, JAPAN
Distances 125 km (75 miles) SE of Morioka, Honshu, Japan
145 km (90 miles) NE of Sendai, Honshu, Japan
180 km (115 miles) SSE of Hachinohe, Honshu, Japan
430 km (265 miles) NNE of TOKYO, Japan

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 15.3 km (9.5 miles); depth +/- 3.1 km (1.9 miles)
Parameters NST=215, Nph=216, Dmin=345.1 km, Rmss=0.94 sec, Gp=115°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)


Event ID us2010zecb



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 07:00 PM
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Even I'm beginning to think there's an awful lot of 5+ going on in succession... looks like Australia and NZ are trying to break free of the rest of the globe


Something big is brewing.. gut feel.. caused by activity in the Philippines/Indonesia area but felt on West Coast of the U.S./South America...

[edit on 26-7-2010 by MoorfNZ]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 07:17 PM
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There nothing going on folks - It's all normal


Sorry - got that one already lol - yes - I have that gut feeling too


[edit on 26-7-2010 by Anmarie96]



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by Anmarie96
 


*tap tap tap* are the USGS sensors switched on? It's a bit quiet, isn't it...



posted on Jul, 26 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by MoorfNZ
 


Tick, Tick, Tick - Yes - Unnerving isn't it?



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:01 AM
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Nothing Globally above 3.8 on the other networks and just a 2.3 in Alaska since 00:00:00 UTC (5 hours ago)


Only this from New Zealand so far
REF, LAT, LONG, DATE/TIME UTC, MAG, DEPTH
3345905, -42.86657 170.90541 , 2010/7/27, 01:23:22.8, 3.449, 5km


[edit on 27-7-2010 by muzzy]



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:05 AM
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Can relax now!!

Magnitude 4.7 MORO GULF, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES

Date-Time

* Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 04:51:14 UTC
* Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 12:51:14 PM at epicenter
* Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 6.821°N, 123.764°E
Depth 594.1 km (369.2 miles)
Region MORO GULF, MINDANAO, PHILIPPINES
Distances 65 km (40 miles) SW of Cotabato, Mindanao, Philippines
115 km (70 miles) SSE of Pagadian, Mindanao, Philippines
170 km (105 miles) WNW of General Santos, Mindanao, Philippines
915 km (570 miles) SSE of MANILA, Philippines

[edit on 27-7-2010 by MoorfNZ]



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:44 AM
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Two more...


Magnitude 4.9 SOUTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA

Date-Time

* Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 08:26:20 UTC
* Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 03:26:20 PM at epicenter
* Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 3.606°S, 101.875°E
Depth 86.2 km (53.6 miles)
Region SOUTHERN SUMATRA, INDONESIA
Distances 50 km (30 miles) WNW of Bengkulu, Sumatra, Indonesia
115 km (70 miles) WSW of Lubuklinggau, Sumatra, Indonesia
265 km (165 miles) W of Perabumulih, Sumatra, Indonesia
620 km (385 miles) WNW of JAKARTA, Java, Indonesia






Magnitude 4.9 STATE OF YAP, FED. STATES OF MICRONESIA

Date-Time

* Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 07:12:51 UTC
* Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 05:12:51 PM at epicenter
* Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 11.542°N, 139.061°E
Depth 37.9 km (23.6 miles)

Region STATE OF YAP, FED. STATES OF MICRONESIA
Distances 245 km (155 miles) NNE of Yap, Micronesia
655 km (405 miles) WSW of HAGATNA, Guam
685 km (425 miles) NE of KOROR, Palau
2145 km (1340 miles) WNW of PALIKIR, Pohnpei, Micronesia

[edit on 27-7-2010 by MoorfNZ]

[edit on 27-7-2010 by MoorfNZ]



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 07:25 AM
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Magnitude 5.0
Date-Time Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 10:14:25 UTC
Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 06:14:25 PM at epicenter
Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

Location 30.378°N, 94.945°E
Depth 41.3 km (25.7 miles)
Region EASTERN XIZANG
Distances 105 km (65 miles) NNE of Pula (Nyingchi), Xizang (Tibet), China
230 km (145 miles) WSW of Qamdo, Xizang (Tibet), China
300 km (185 miles) ESE of Nagqu, Xizang (Tibet), China
2220 km (1380 miles) WSW of BEIJING, Beijing, China

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 20.4 km (12.7 miles); depth +/- 35.4 km (22.0 miles)
Parameters NST= 22, Nph= 22, Dmin=>999 km, Rmss=0.79 sec, Gp=115°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source USGS NEIC (WDCS-D)


Event ID us2010zfau



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:20 PM
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Hebejeebee's - This is deep for this area.

Magnitude 5.2
Date-Time Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 16:54:12 UTC
Wednesday, July 28, 2010 at 01:54:12 AM at epicenter

Location 7.264°S, 126.411°E
Depth 370.8 km (230.4 miles)
Region KEPULAUAN BARAT DAYA, INDONESIA
Distances 173 km (107 miles) NNE (32°) from DILI, East Timor
443 km (275 miles) SSW (206°) from Ambon, Moluccas, Indonesia
448 km (278 miles) NE (44°) from Kupang, Timor, Indonesia

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 18.9 km (11.7 miles); depth +/- 8.8 km (5.5 miles)
Parameters NST= 29, Nph= 31, Dmin=362.9 km, Rmss=1.17 sec, Gp= 43°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center:
World Data Center for Seismology, Denver

Event ID us2010zfbc



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:46 PM
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Originally posted by Anmarie96
Hebejeebee's - This is deep for this area.


What is going on with these deep quakes on the eastern edge of the Eurasian plate ?

They seem to be in deep water areas as well.


Also a question that's been bugging me for a while, when quakes say depth are they based off sea level or the depth from the ground to the epicentre ?



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 12:53 PM
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Originally posted by Anmarie96
Hebejeebee's - This is deep for this area.

Magnitude 5.2
Date-Time Tuesday, July 27, 2010 at 16:54:12 UTC
Wednesday, July 28, 2010 at 01:54:12 AM at epicenter

Location 7.264°S, 126.411°E
Depth 370.8 km (230.4 miles)
Region KEPULAUAN BARAT DAYA, INDONESIA
Distances 173 km (107 miles) NNE (32°) from DILI, East Timor
443 km (275 miles) SSW (206°) from Ambon, Moluccas, Indonesia
448 km (278 miles) NE (44°) from Kupang, Timor, Indonesia

Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 18.9 km (11.7 miles); depth +/- 8.8 km (5.5 miles)
Parameters NST= 29, Nph= 31, Dmin=362.9 km, Rmss=1.17 sec, Gp= 43°,
M-type=body wave magnitude (Mb), Version=6
Source U.S. Geological Survey, National Earthquake Information Center:
World Data Center for Seismology, Denver

Event ID us2010zfbc


Actually no, deep focus earthquakes are far from uncommon in this area. A rough estimate would be that around 1/4 is actually deep- or near deep focus quakes in that area. At least judging by this map: neic.usgs.gov...



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 01:01 PM
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Originally posted by Discotech

Originally posted by Anmarie96
Hebejeebee's - This is deep for this area.


What is going on with these deep quakes on the eastern edge of the Eurasian plate ?



If we knew the answer to that I doubt we would be posting the answer here, more likely kicking back on the beach somewhere in the Caribbean or South Pacific after collecting the $40million prize from USGS.



Seroiusly though I believe that one of the planets just moved out of the alignment that was in progress since June 13, 2010. Uranus, Jupiter, and Mercury were lined up on one side of the Sun while Venus, Mars, and Saturn were be lined up on the other side. Earth was perpendicular to the Sun at this time also. And we just had a Full Moon.
.


[edit on 27-7-2010 by muzzy]



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 01:13 PM
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reply to post by rasalhague
 


Yes - but Maybe I should clarify - alot of deep quakes over the past few days in that general area. Sorry

Quake depth is measured from the earths surface - under the sea.

Muzzy - your toooo funny!!!!



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by Discotech
 



Also a question that's been bugging me for a while, when quakes say depth are they based off sea level or the depth from the ground to the epicentre ?


That is a very good question. I have always assumed it to be above the sea bed. The epicentre by the way is the point on the surface ABOVE the earthquake, not where the earthquake occurs thus I have assumed that the depth of a quake is the depth from the epicentre to the hypocentre (where the quake actually occurs)

See Wikipedia for details of where the epicentre is.

Unfortunately this does not answer your question so I have sent a request to USGS for information and I will post their reply when I get it.

reply to post by Anmarie96
 


That would be logical, but are you sure?

[edit on 27/7/2010 by PuterMan]



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by PuterMan
 


Determining the Depth of an Earthquake

Earthquakes can occur anywhere between the Earth's surface and about 700 kilometers below the surface. For scientific purposes, this earthquake depth range of 0 - 700 km is divided into three zones: shallow, intermediate, and deep.

Shallow earthquakes are between 0 and 70 km deep; intermediate earthquakes, 70 - 300 km deep; and deep earthquakes, 300 - 700 km deep. In general, the term "deep-focus earthquakes" is applied to earthquakes deeper than 70 km. All earthquakes deeper than 70 km are localized within great slabs of shallow lithosphere that are sinking into the Earth's mantle.

The evidence for deep-focus earthquakes was discovered in 1922 by H.H. Turner of Oxford, England. Previously, all earthquakes were considered to have shallow focal depths. The existence of deep-focus earthquakes was confirmed in 1931 from studies of the seismograms of several earthquakes, which in turn led to the construction of travel-time curves for intermediate and deep earthquakes.

The most obvious indication on a seismogram that a large earthquake has a deep focus is the small amplitude, or height, of the recorded surface waves and the uncomplicated character of the P and S waves. Although the surface-wave pattern does generally indicate that an earthquake is either shallow or may have some depth, the most accurate method of determining the focal depth of an earthquake is to read a depth phase recorded on the seismogram. The most characteristic depth phase is pP. This is the P wave that is reflected from the surface of the Earth at a point relatively near the epicenter. At distant seismograph stations, the pP follows the P wave by a time interval that changes slowly with distance but rapidly with depth. This time interval, pP-P (pP minus P), is used to compute depth-of-focus tables. Using the time difference of pP-P as read from the seismogram and the distance between the epicenter and the seismograph station, the depth of the earthquake can be determined from published travel-time curves or depth tables.

Another seismic wave used to determine focal depth is the sP phase - an S wave reflected as a P wave from the Earth's surface at a point near the epicenter. This wave is recorded after the pP by about one-half of the pP-P time interval. The depth of an earthquake can be determined from the sP phase in the same manner as the pP phase by using the appropriate travel-time curves or depth tables for sP.

If the pP and sP waves can be identified on the seismogram, an accurate focal depth can be determined.

by William Spence, Stuart A. Sipkin, and George L. Choy
Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Volume 21, Number 1, 1989



posted on Jul, 27 2010 @ 01:44 PM
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reply to post by muzzy
 



If we knew the answer to that I doubt we would be posting the answer here, more likely kicking back on the beach somewhere in the Caribbean or South Pacific after collecting the $40million prize from USGS.


I know the answer do I get $40 million? Yes? Please? Pretty Please?


It is because they are nearly always that depth in that area!

This graph is the depths of all the quakes (148) of Mag 4.0+ between 1990 and now. You will see that the ones that are not deep are all the same depth with very few exceptions. This is because the are undetermined and use the standard 33, 35 or 10 depth when they haven't got a clue. So there you have it, they are always that deep there. Make the cheque out to "Puterman and Friends" please Mr USGS.



Edit to say cumulative in dates coming up maybe.

Sorry it is a bit big so you can see the detail. It seems to have these small bursts about every 5 years or so. Basically what these two graphs show me is that the activity in the area is not particularly out of the norm. Nothing to see here, move along folks (but give me $40,000,000 first
)



[edit on 27/7/2010 by PuterMan]




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