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Moon hole might be suitable for colony

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posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 01:42 PM
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I found this Article interesting thought you all might as well. What's everyones thoughts on setting up a colony in a hole in the moon?





(CNN) -- Building a home near a moon crater or a lunar sea may sound nice, but moon colonists might have a much better chance of survival if they just lived in a hole. That's the message sent by an international team of scientists who say they've discovered a protected lunar "lava tube" -- a deep, giant hole -- that might be well suited for a moon colony or a lunar base.



Source




posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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too bad its already occupied
=)



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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"What's everyones thoughts on setting up a colony in a hole in the moon?"

Cost too much money - if using rocket technology for the mission.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 02:15 PM
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reply to post by Larryman
 


Bill Gates needs to come off some cash!


Youre right, it would be hard to bring stuff to the moon, but what about a story I posted a while back?

Check out my link:Using moon dust for structures

I think this could drastically make it less expensive. Also, easier.
Since it really hasnt been tested though, who knows just exactly how stable it would be.

I think we will see alot of really neat stuff in the next twenty years.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 02:25 PM
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I saw this on JAXA site back in November. It is known as the Marius Hills Hole. Located on the near side at 303.3°E, 14.2°N. It is the first lava tube tunnel found on the the moon. Here is the link to the JAXA images:
wms.selene.jaxa.jp...

The article states that it is over 260 feet deep but i t could be several miles deep nobody would really know until it is explored.

Could it already be occupied? Maybe. I remembered a video I saw a while back after reading about this. Here is a link to a video that appears to show what looks like a smoke stack releasing a puff of smoke during the apollo 8 orbit back in 1968. I thought it was interesting and hard to explain away as natural.
www.disclose.tv...

Interesting topic.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 02:31 PM
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Start with anti-gravity propulsion.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 08:16 PM
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Originally posted by '___'omino
too bad its already occupied
=)


LOL You could be right ya know



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 09:03 PM
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your right, it is too much money but it is exciting to see them even thinking of the idea... such times we live in...


jra

posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 10:14 PM
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Originally posted by Larryman
Cost too much money - if using rocket technology for the mission.


The cost for rockets can change. Especially if one uses a commercial launching service. Besides, I don't believe rockets are the most expensive part of going to the Moon.


Start with anti-gravity propulsion.


Easier said than done...


Originally posted by InertiaZero
Check out my link:Using moon dust for structures

I think this could drastically make it less expensive. Also, easier.


I don't know about it being easier, since it would still need to be tested, but it would help in decreasing the amount of things you'd need to bring to the Moon. Perhaps using Lunar concrete/bricks in conjunction with inflatable modules might be the way to go.



posted on Jan, 1 2010 @ 10:35 PM
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A little further info on Lava Tubes this is a great confirmed find.

What is also important about it is that it is one possible way for human colonies to spread further out as we become a Type II civilzation. We start on the Moon but if LavaTubes exist throught out the Solar System as they seem likely to do: we might expect to find lava tubes on Mars, Mercury (the temperature swing refuge would make them hot property), Venus (they would be too hot, and share Venus' over-pressurization), Io (protection from Jupiter's radiation belts), and even on little Vesta. If we get the hang of it there is no real reason the lifestyle and technology can't be used to spread us out at least to Jupiter.

In the Link you can see there is the potential for vast, vast areas to be colonized on the moon using this method -- times that many times as we spread Sol-system wide

[edit on 1-1-2010 by Landru]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 11:42 AM
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This apparent hole in the moon is like a skylight, a vertical cave 213 feet (65 meters) across and some 262 to 289 feet deep (80-88 meters).



How do they determine its depth?


[edit on 2-1-2010 by loam]



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