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False advertising? Teens turn into DNA detectives.

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posted on Dec, 30 2009 @ 12:38 AM
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Well, its a long article so i will let you read it for yourself. I feel this one will be hard to sum up.

cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com...

Very interesting though.




posted on Dec, 30 2009 @ 01:31 AM
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"The idea was to explore our environment through the lens of DNA," Matt Cost, an 18-year-old senior at Manhattan's Trinity School, told me. The experiment turned up more than 150 usable DNA fingerprints, found in common items ranging from apartment-building bugs to a feather duster.



The samples were collected at Cost's apartment building on the Upper East Side and Tan's house in Brooklyn, as well as at Trinity School, in the homes of friends and around the neighborhood. The students also took strands of hair from eight of their classmates. "We were happy to report that they all came back as 100 percent human," Tan said in a Rockefeller University


I'm not entirely sure of this still, but isn't DNA still inconclusive in courtrooms, as they are not accurate?

The article is interesting, I suppose. The experiment does give the impression to our youth that big brother is 'fun'. Perhaps you don't feel that the article gives off that vibe. That's fine. But how should we all feel about DNA having barcodes?



posted on Dec, 30 2009 @ 01:54 AM
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I'm not entirely sure of this still, but isn't DNA still inconclusive in courtrooms, as they are not accurate?


No, DNA evidence is allowed. What is usually disputed is how the evidence was obtained, who did the testing, how the test was done and how the evidence was handled.

Concerning the DNA barcoding, if we don't destroy ourselves first we'll most likely go the way of GATTACA.



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