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Hinduism the most advanced religion?

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posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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Hinduism is rather complex you have different yoga paths and rituals. It also predates Judaism making it the worlds oldest practiced religion. It is also the most liberal and that it teaches all paths lead to God.

Do you think it's the most advanced religion in the world? Why are why not?

I've been reading the Bhagavad Gita and find it very insightful.




posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by TinFoilHatMan55
 





Hinduism is rather complex you have different yoga paths and rituals

It's the complexity that has always put me off reading about this stuff.

Please feel free to post some nice janet and john simple once upon a time Hindu translations, I for one would be interested in a read.
this yoga business though,, I dunno dude I'm too old and fat to even consider the possibility of getting into some of those positions let alone the reason why I should want to .



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 10:47 AM
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reply to post by TinFoilHatMan55
 


I do believe it to be one of the oldest known religions and the people who practice it seem to be very intact with GOD and their ways are respectful. So I agree that it is the most known advanced religion.



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 10:58 AM
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Yoga simply means 'yoke' like yoke yourself to the divine. What you are thinking of is Hatha Yoga that has all those flexable poses.

Here is a overview of the different yogic paths: wikipedia yoga entry

Here is the Bhagavad Gita it's about Lord Krishna giving insight and divine wisdom to Arjuna. It's a good read and would highly recommend it. It contains a condensed but thorough overview of the Hindu philosophy.

Here is a website that covers facts and misconceptions about Hinduism.

[edit on 29-12-2009 by TinFoilHatMan55]



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 10:58 AM
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The complexity you see is just an illusion.

(good joke for anyone that has investigated what hindusim teaches)



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 11:04 AM
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I think Hinduism is best considered as a collection of religions that are vaguely related rather than a single religion. I strongly disagree that these differences are illusory. For example:

-Vedic Hinduism: The most ancient form, centering around the Vedas (very ancient sacred writings) and the correct performance of rituals. Often very caste-oriented.

-Upanishadic Hinduism: Based on the Upanishads and other writings. More philosophical and panthiestic.

-Bhakti: Devotion based in surrender or love to a given diety. Examples include Shiva, Krishna, and Shakti. Devotees concentrate more on reaching pure devotion to these dieties through ritual and love rather than on textual studies, although that goes on too.

These are all miles apart, and there are other varieties, too. Then even within, say, one of these three, there is tremendous differences. Some Bhakti devotees worship Krishna as suprime lord, others say Shiva. Then there are other cross currents: Some Hindus are very pantheistic ("all is one") while others are more involved in worshiping a seperate God and are more montheistic like the Abrahamic religions. The idea that all Hindus are panthiests and believe in the fundamental unity of the cosmos and of man and the divine is incorrect.

Let's take a concept like Yoga (not embraced by all forms of Hinduism, by the way) Drilling deeper, there is division into "paths:" Karma-yoga (the yoga of selfless action); Jnana-yoga (philosophical research and wisdom); Astanga/RajaYoga (physical exercises and meditation); and Bhakti-Yoga (the path of devotional service). Then there are "sub-paths." You could cut the cake this way too, if you choose. Some say these are all separate; some arrange them in hierarchy, with the different types seen as more or less powerful than each other. Some say they lead to the same place and are equally valid.

Some go in for aseticism, like starving the body to near-death or undertaking severe austere practices like marathon yoga or meditation sessions. Then there is Tantrism which involves sexual yoga among other things and is often misunderstood...lot of different ideas, texts, and practices bumping around, as well as smaller sub-movements that have come and gone that can't be neatly classified.Then you have the whole caste issue...very complex: for a strict, orthox, Brahmanical Hindu, its a sin for an untouchable to even cross his shadow. For a Shiva-worshiping tantrist during a ganachakra ritual, all such divisions dissolve. Do some research...the topic seems (and is) bewilderingly complex and diverse but very rewarding.


In short, there is not one "Hinduism" but many "Hinduisms".


[edit on 12/29/09 by silent thunder]



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