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120 whales dead in NZ mass strandings

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posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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www.timesonline.co.uk...


More than 120 whales have died over 48 hours in two separate beachings in New Zealand.

Over 100 long finned pilot whales died after becoming stranded on a remote beach in the north of NZ's South Island on Saturday, while another 20 will be buried by a local Maori tribe after they beached themselves on the North Island's east coast.

While strandings are common in New Zealand - there are up to six mass strandings a year - it is rare for two to happen so close together.


lookin for religious and environmental savvy folks to tell me if this uncommon or unusual and if this is perhaps another sign of the end times?




posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:16 PM
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reply to post by TheCoffinman
 


Well when the endtime is near supposedly all the fish in all the sea's and river's will die.

So beaching of 100 or so whales doesn't mean anything quiet yet, except that i find it sadening to hear that alot of whales died. D:



posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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reply to post by TheCoffinman
 


Unfortunately it's not uncommon or unusual. Mass strandings are fairly common and happen a couple times a year. Australia's had a few big ones this year, and I have a friend who was studying one of the ones in New Zealand earlier this year as well. Toothed whales seem to be affected more than baleen whales, at least as far as I can tell. It happens all over the world, to whales, to dolphins, to numerous species. At night, during the day, it happens.

I don't think it's so rare for them to happen so close together. I would actually call this the same stranding. Strandings themselves can last for days, between when the first individual beaches and the last. And since this is the same species and same area, I would call it one mass stranding, two localized groups of beachings.

It's a bummer. I mean, I'm very familiar with these events and I work with beached individuals (cetaceans and pinnipeds- whales/dolphins and seals/walruses) on a regular basis. They say "It's the climate, it's the earth's magnetism, it's the sonar, it's the bacteria and chemicals in the water, blah blah blah."

I honestly don't know what it is but I do know that sonar and other devices used by Naval Forces can greatly affect cetaceans. And I know that changes in magnetism can affect the internal compasses of cetaceans. I also know that cetaceans have a mechanism where if one animal beaches, perhaps due to illness or some other factor, many will follow, maybe in an attempt to try and save that individual.

So I don't know. But it's honestly very sad. Not unusual or uncommon, though. Perhaps becoming more common due to sonar use, but, that's not for me to say.

[edit on 12/27/2009 by ravenshadow13]



posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:22 PM
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This is a very sad thing to happen but I don't think it's the end times.
Maybe a precursor to some earthquakes in the area???

Cheers



posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:42 PM
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Originally posted by ravenshadow13
reply to post by TheCoffinman
 


It's a bummer. I mean, I'm very familiar with these events and I work with beached individuals (cetaceans and pinnipeds- whales/dolphins and seals/walruses) on a regular basis. They say "It's the climate, it's the earth's magnetism, it's the sonar, it's the bacteria and chemicals in the water, blah blah blah."

I honestly don't know what it is but I do know that sonar and other devices used by Naval Forces can greatly affect cetaceans. And I know that changes in magnetism can affect the internal compasses of cetaceans. I also know that cetaceans have a mechanism where if one animal beaches, perhaps due to illness or some other factor, many will follow, maybe in an attempt to try and save that individual.

[edit on 12/27/2009 by ravenshadow13]


Studies seem to show that the factors you observed are pretty much the reason behind this.
It doesnt help when the Naval forces of the world have been asked to take into consideration that their equipments do this, and pretty much said NO.... (alternates were provided).

So not only are we endangering these species by allowing the Asians to fish them, but us Westerners are also stuffing them up by mucking around with their habitats and the natural abilities to navigate.

We live in a caring world
, we dont give a toss about our environment let alone each other.... so why should we worry about another species.

Sorry
Just makes me sad. We could fix so much up yet nothing is ever done!



posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:48 PM
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It's always sad when this happens. To see such huge creatures suffocating to death is heartwrenching.




posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:51 PM
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This happened a few days ago. Fisheries officers and volunteers on Thursday rescued a pilot whale that had washed up on a Nova Scotia beach, while efforts continued to save several more.

The rescue effort began Tuesday when the Department of Fisheries and Oceans got a call that there was a stranded whale in Port Maitland, near Yarmouth.

Other calls followed, with reports of up to 12 whales stranded in the area and a few kilometres north up to Bartletts Beach.

On Thursday afternoon, DFO staff and volunteers managed to move one of the two-to-three-tonne cetaceans back into the water. They first dug a big trench in the beach and next moved the whale into the trench using a tarp and pontoons. Then it was a matter of pushing the whale out through the trench into the ocean. Sourcewww.cbc.ca...



posted on Dec, 27 2009 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by TheBlackDog
 


Me too, I agree.

Haarp, anyone?



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by TheCoffinman
 



Stories like these just break my heart.
This part of the article describes just how noble, valiant, and loyal whales are to their pod families. They stick together and take care of one another. IMO, whales and dolphins are fine examples of how humans should strive to be. Animals have a lot to teach us if we'd stop and take the time to learn from them. IMO, that's why I think they were made first--not for us to have dominion over them--but to serve as our teachers. I think that the Natives had it right the first time. When Man exalted himself above all creation, that's precisely what threw everything out of balance.





"The majority of strandings involve pilot whales," said Mr Donaghue. "They are highly social whales and if one gets into trouble the others are reluctant to abandon it.

"If a sick animal goes into shallow water the others will follow it in. Once they're in shallow water, their sonar doesn't work as the sand scatters their sonar waves and they become confused.

"This is what may have happened here. I have never seen a group so reluctant to go back to sea. Most of the time it takes a couple of minutes to refloat stranded whales but this time they kept milling about and squealing. At one point I thought they were going to re-strand, but they might just have been waiting for mummy to give birth."




[edit on 28-12-2009 by gazerstar]



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by The_Seeker
 


The thing about the studies is that it's really hard to conduct an exact study on this without endangering cetaceans and other organisms. You can never replicate the exact environment. And there haven't been many studies, not as many as you might think. But it's true that the Navy has basically refused to take action. They've actually funded some studies, if I remember correctly, in an attempt to make themselves look better and prove themselves innocent, but I believe they did find that sonar was impacting the whales (duh) and then they sort of covered it up and refused to do anything about it.

I could be completely wrong about that, but it seems to ring a bell, I think my friend who was working on the Tasman stranding told me about it.

Um. Conspiracy. *points* That's called a conspiracy.



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 03:20 AM
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43 whales have been saved...but still very sad

has this something to do with the fact that the magnetic pole is racing towards siberia?
Just a thought.

cheers



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 04:05 AM
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reply to post by ravenshadow13
 


I would have to say, I honestly thought that there was in depth research into this.....I had to be honest only read the ONE article re this subject and their findings, cant remember where (maybe Viewzone or Nexus Mag or something).
But I will have to say, as you stated, common sense prevails really regarding the sonar and their affect on animals and their senses (even ours if you think on it)



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 06:48 AM
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Maybe something frightens them out of the water.

Maybe it is some form of retreat from an enemy.

Maybe it is some instinctive urge that is similar to an urge that once forced another species to wander out of the water, and eventually become... us?



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 06:55 AM
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Here's another possible explanation to some whale beachings.


Current research is aiming to verify a process known as sonar termination. It may be that sonar termination is the main cause of dysfunction of cetacean echolocation during a mass stranding of apparently healthy toothed cetaceans (odontoceti). Sonar termination occurs when a pod of cetaceans emits an echolocation signal toward a coast with a gently sloping shoreline and under certain meteorological conditions a reflection will not be detected. The reflection contains important information about the location and features of the shoreline. The lack of reflections received from the coast would appear to be a ‘deaf spot’ to the cetaceans, analogous to the human ‘blind spot’. The coast may appear as thick 'fog' to the pod of cetaceans and may induce a navigational error.
\

More info here:

www.biophysics.uwa.edu.au...




posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 09:39 AM
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thanks for the info everyone, where are the religious scholars at in here??? you did say they happen all the time so in a way, perhaps that part of propechy, fish all dying in the seas, maybe be coming to pass afterall...




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