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Insider theft a big problem for small charities

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posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 07:25 AM
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Insider theft a big problem for small charities


www.msnbc.msn.com

When Tioga County Habitat for Humanity in south-central New York discovered that its treasurer hadn’t been paying the bills, it immediately moved to freeze its bank account. It was too late: the account was empty. The treasurer, David L. Heckman Jr., faces trial next year for allegedly stealing more than $50,000 from the charity — a loss that, among other things, meant the nonprofit was unable to finish a home for a needy family before winter set in.

Heckman has denied taking the money.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 07:25 AM
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This is something to think about during this season. I hope you wont stop trusting your local charity. This is a problem but does not represent all charities. I have experienced similar things with charies although not with cash as this story is describing. I think this does point out that auditing and over sight are good to have at almost all levels.

www.msnbc.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 08:13 AM
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It goes deeper than that I've been told. Some charities actually buy out key staff members of other organisations to eliminate the 'competition' and generate more cash or opportunities for themselves.

There's a non-profit organisation that helps with volunteering in Thailand who had their paid webmaster systematically destroy their website slowly over time whilst said webmaster was building up their own set of sites to promote their own for-profit organisation. Archive.org will show you when they were employed so you can see the site stops existing there the minute they came to assist.

Sorry stuff for some charitable agencies these days. Too much profit or administrative costs and not enough free love and good will.

Thankfully, according to a friend, said non-profit seems to be just about back on it's feet and not haemorrhaging as much donation money as before but these things are prevalent throughout these some so-called aid organisations and should hold an international blacklist for those doing so IMO.

Good call for bringing this up during the festive season.

-m0r



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 08:15 AM
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Wow what a jack-ass! 50 Grand? I mean I could understand like a cool million being tempting but 50 Grand? WTF was he gunna do put a down payment on a new car? Pay down a credit card? Never stops amazing me how dumb criminals are..



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 08:30 AM
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Originally posted by m0r1arty


There's a non-profit organisation that helps with volunteering in Thailand who had their paid webmaster systematically destroy their website slowly over time whilst said webmaster was building up their own set of sites to promote their own for-profit organisation. Archive.org will show you when they were employed so you can see the site stops existing there the minute they came to assist.


Wow that is bad. I know charities compete for donations but I did not know it got that ruff. Thanks for the info.





Good call for bringing this up during the festive season.




Thanks for the post and the complement. Do wish you a happy season.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 08:58 AM
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Np my friend,

I just think it's important that we all know who and what we give our funds to. There are good guys and there are bad guys.

Shame there is no way of knowing who is who (Although I have it on reasonably good authority that the guys I linked to are meant to be good). I wish it were simple to set up some sort of database of who's who.

I suppose checking with government agencies to see who is actually non-profit would be nice, or simpler yet an international badge to state so.

Again, a very nice thing to mull over during the festive and reflective season you've brought up.

-m0r



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 09:30 AM
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I volunteer at a local Salvation Army store 3-5 times a week, and I often wonder how much oversight goes into managing nonprofit orgs. I think it's safe to say that more of the people involved in the majority of nonprofits have their hand in the cookie jar than not. I do know that all the "majors" with the SA get a free vehicle and unlimited gas card for personal use. I think that is garbage, but it's also just one small example from one of the larger nonprofits.

OT, but in the spirit of the season: I sort donations in back, and the stuff that cannot be sold gets pitched or recycled. When I notice that cardboard boxes have ended up in the extremely large dumpster, I usually try to fish them out for recycling. One day late last month I was doing this and found one pink and one white Nintendo DS lite - exactly what my niece and nephew had asked for for Christmas, down to the color. It felt like karma.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 09:43 AM
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reply to post by maus80
 


Maus
thank you for taking the time to volunteer

I know the salvation army is so large that there has to be some level of corruption going on, that would amount to a very high dollar count. Still I am grateful for what they do, and for people taking the time to volunteer.

I give a small amount of money out of every pay check, its not much but it always come out. You might find it hard to believe but I at least to trust the administration of the fund. The people that the benefits go to I will with hold judgment on.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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I used to give to The Tibetan Foundation and Cancer Relief, however, afterwards I began to research these charities and the conclusion I have came to is that, wherever there is large amounts of money there is corruption. Also by giving money to charities creates DEPENDENCY we all know where that leads to.

In truth I am utterly convinced that the money that is donated does not get to its rightful place instead lines the pockets of the greedy.



[edit on 22-12-2009 by franspeakfree]



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 10:37 AM
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I think that alot of this can be blamed on this so called mandatory public service. It used to be that these non-profits had volunteers who wanted to be there and to help, now we have people who "have" to be there. In my area, the local high schools have a 40 hour requirement and most of the local colleges have a 120 hour requirement before graduation. This isn't counting the people who have to put in so many hours per month to get their Welfare benefits. I'm not picking on any of these groups, all I am saying is that there is a "different" type of "volunteer" out there these days and with the increased numbers, the chances of the "wrong" person being in a position for theft has increased.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by ThePeoplesSoldier
Wow what a jack-ass! 50 Grand? I mean I could understand like a cool million being tempting but 50 Grand? WTF was he gunna do put a down payment on a new car? Pay down a credit card? Never stops amazing me how dumb criminals are..



I would assume some sort of addiction was involved here, maybe gambling and prostitutes.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 12:44 PM
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Originally posted by franspeakfree
I used to give to The Tibetan Foundation and Cancer Relief, however, afterwards I began to research these charities and the conclusion I have came to is that, wherever there is large amounts of money there is corruption.


Out of everything you said that statement above is the one i agree with the most. The charity I give to is managed by my employer. The employer takes nothing for managing it. As of the last time I checked any way. Distribution is done by a board of volunteers. As far as the management goes I trust what is being done. As to the distribution that aspect of it may be as corrupt as any other charity.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by JIMC5499
 


Last time I checked, high school students weren't doing the accounting.


non profits are easy targets because they are not as organized, and don't have the resources and means to track pennies like a company would. Not to mention, if you have people volunteering, you dont' want to hurt volunteers by scrutinizing them.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 02:26 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
non profits are easy targets because they are not as organized, and don't have the resources and means to track pennies like a company would. Not to mention, if you have people volunteering, you dont' want to hurt volunteers by scrutinizing them.


QFT!

Just like some people have "Doormat" tattooed to their foreheads that causes them to attract every Serial Abuser or BPD person in a 50 mile radius, Non-Profits are the same way. The nature of Non-Profits attracts the low-life scum that preys on their trust.

A Non-Profit Co-Op I once worked for had not one, but three CTOs in a row commit acts of Embezzlement, even under the nose of the General Manager and Board of Directors.

Our local Public Transportation District hasn't had a Treasurer that didn't embezzle from them in over 25 years and counting!

Non-Profits, especially Charities, do good work, and one shouldn't ever be discouraged from donating to them. However, it is a sad fact that they are commonly preyed upon by the less scrupulous.

Hopefully there is a level of Hades where these people go when they die, somewhere between the Lawyers and Used-Car Salesmen.



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox
Last time I checked, high school students weren't doing the accounting.



A couple of weeks ago I manned a collection point for a local charity for several hours. Collections went into a padlocked container that I signed out. When my time was up and I took the container back to the charity's office, the people that I turned the container over to, who had the key, were friends and classmates of my nephew, who is a Senior in high school. I have no concerns about where that money went, I know both students and their families.



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