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Why does the Military 'crap' on their own vets?

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posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 05:15 PM
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Viable maintained live ammunition is our most valuable asset in battle.

Spent shell casings can be discarded.

Including veterans.




posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Walkswithfish
 


I know you have said this in sarcasm, but nonetheless it brought tears to my eyes. Harsh. Even for sarcasm.



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by Walkswithfish

Viable maintained live ammunition is our most valuable asset in battle.

Spent shell casings can be discarded.

Including veterans.


I think that sums it up perfectly...



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 05:48 PM
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reply to post by ladyinwaiting
 


Sometimes it is easier to express a thought on a subject this way, and with as few words as possible.

Honestly, our veterans are in many ways "spent ammunition"

We have a government that can throw trillions of dollars around at anything and everything without any backlash, but when it comes to veterans they will have a major debate, fight and ultimately find the absolute lowest cost, least liability solutions and even then will likely only make things worse.

Those who survive wars quickly become a costly liability, and a serious budgetary issue.

We must think of the cost, and the bottom line always. Cost effective reality must be the top priority.

Dollars saved when dealing with veteran issues are better spent in the active military budgets.




posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 06:09 PM
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reply to post by Walkswithfish
 



I've always preferred the term, "Kevlar that can mow the grass."

The government has never really cared about the vets, and as you said, they'll bitch and moan about any funding for the VA, and then pat themselves on the back for the pennies they gave us.



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 06:11 PM
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Poor / stupid people used as fodder to wage wars of profit for rich people. Just like the Roman and British Empires. No difference.



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 06:40 PM
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As many have said, the military is not responsible for veterans. The VA is.

Which explains why vets are not cared for very well in the least bit.

Around me and my friends, having problems with the VA is like breathing oxygen. We all do.



posted on Dec, 20 2009 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by rizla
Poor / stupid people used as fodder to wage wars of profit for rich people.


Yep, and all blacks are criminals that play basketball and Japanese people can't drive cars and buy way too many cameras.

Try not to buy into the stereotype that all people join the military because they are poor or stupid.



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 12:45 PM
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reply to post by rizla
 
C'mon, now you sound like the OP.........so you really have nothing other than being insulting?




posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by GENERAL EYES
 


GE -- I met a veteran who was not homeless, but denied of his compensation, his veteran benefits, and this I doubt he had reason to lie about.

Do I think there is a homeless veterans? It's obvious there is, look at the economy and look at the checks they get, if they EVEN get them



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by Revolution-2012
 


The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

There is no doubt in my mind that there are some veterans out there who, for whatever reason, are homeless and/or not recieving what they (or others) feel is due compensation.

I'm just skeptical of the sudden surge of organizations who are claiming these massive numbers, donation campaigning, and youtube videos or other such visual solicitation without showing actual cases of homeless vets.

I hope I don't sound callous on this issue - I'm from a multi-generational military family (on both sides) and I have nothing but the deepest sympathies for those who have elected to serve the common good in the armed forces and who are now facing hard times.

It should be noted that during my tenure of working with the homeless, that there are a number of very persuasive con-artists who will claim to be "veterans" in order to play on the heart strings of people.

Sadly, it turns out there are a number of organizations out there who are pulling the same ploy in order to recieve donations themselves.

While homelessness is - in any capacity - a horrendous social ill and one I have sought to alieviate to the best of my limited ability - there are also staggering amounts of people who misappropriate funding (be it a handout or a signed check to an agency) for less than noble purposes.

One thing I've learned over the years is that just because it waves a flag, wears an army jacket or has a medal or insignia - doesn't make it military.

(pins, patches, jackets, etc are widely available at any army/navy surplus.)

An actual veteran will be able to tell you more about his/her history than just a sob story of hard times and abandonment.

I expect the same of charitable organizations.

Just be careful and trust your gut on face to face interactions.

In contributing to organized efforts - look for a verifiable track record.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



*edit - Big Brother demands spell check.

[edit on 12/21/09 by GENERAL EYES]



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 08:41 PM
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reply to post by rainfall
 


edited

comment below

[edit on 21-12-2009 by jam321]



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by rainfall
 



In respect to the op and hope that this makes people more aware of homeless vets, I edit what I had previously written.

I just want everybody to understand that in many cases, the people- not the government- are the ones that can make the most difference in people lives.


don't expect government to correct everything that is wrong with this country.

As JFK said

"Ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country."


www.whitehouse.gov...

Help the vets, help your neighbors, and let's make this world a better place.

[edit on 21-12-2009 by jam321]



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 03:38 AM
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Originally posted by DINSTAAR
As many have said, the military is not responsible for veterans. The VA is.

Which explains why vets are not cared for very well in the least bit.

Around me and my friends, having problems with the VA is like breathing oxygen. We all do.


Dealing with the VA is like dealing with Medicare times 10. There are many services available to veterans but you have to jump through hoops and do lots of digging to find out what they are and where they're obtainable.

My wife's brother lost both of his eyes and part of his brain to a sniper in Vietnam. She handled most of his care locally with his insurance and disability pension until recent years, partially because the local VA facility in Indiana is so far away from where we live in Indiana. In some instances, they wouldn't approve him for one thing or another unless she could prove that he was blind despite it beng documented that he had lost both eyes in the field, for God's sake.

However, his health took a bad turn five years ago and after digging, she found many benefits for him that she never knew existed. It helped that a VA clinic opened closer to us as well. VA clinics and hospitals aren't around every corner and sometimes traveling to them is prohibitive. Another obstacle to obtaining care.

As far as the homeless issue goes, I have almost no doubt that most of those are 'Nam era vets. For those too young to remember, returning vets in general in those days did not receive the fanfare or sympathy that vets today receive. Their efforts upon returning home from an even more unpopular war than either Iraq or Afghanistan were often met by scorn and antipathy. The effects of the war on them wasn't under a microscope as they are today and many had issues that they had no coping mechanism for with little understanding of how to obtain help. My one brother came back in '70. He battled alcoholism for 13 years before getting his life back on track. Although a combat veteran, he's never used VA assistance of any kind.

Some probably came back without even realizing they qualified for this or that benefit. Mental illnesses such as PTSD weren't even recognized. Alcoholics were looked upon as drunks, not someone with a disease. Mental health treatment in general was still in its infancy relative to today, where we have dozens of diagnoses with a pill or four or five for every one. The wars were different, the times were different, the attitudes are different, the resources available are different.


CX

posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 04:19 AM
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reply to post by GradyPhilpott
 


Totaly agree, it's the same here in the UK.

I often here people shouting about how badly veterans are treated, but it has nothing to do with the military any more once you leave.

There are loads of organisations out there now to support ex-forces, many just don't take the offer up though. I have met many an ex-servicemen, including a few that were homeless in London, who have refused point blank to seek help from the organisations i've told them about.

Not much you can do about that really is there?

If you're in the UK, i'd advise any ex-serviceman or woman, contact your nearest British Legion or Veterans Agency, especially if you've been injured in the course of duty, you will be missing out on more help than you realise.

Forget the macho image thing of "I can cope by myself", you might not always be able to.

I'm aware that not many homeless people have acess to the internet, but heres a couple of sites and telephone numbers.....whilst you might not always get as much help as you anticipated, i promise you they will not turn you away. Even if you're sat at home reading this and have never had help since leaving the forces, use this info.

Veterans Agency

Contact number in the UK....0800 169 22 77

Royal British Legion

Contact number in the UK.....08457 725 725

You only have to have served 7 days to qualify for help from the RBL, or if you're dependant upon someone who has served.

You earned the right for this help, thats what they are there for. Accept the help that is there, please.

I appreciate that there are a few cases where things don't go well for veterans, and that sometimes the help seems non-existant, but in my experience, thats rare if you swallow your pride and ask for help.

CX.



[edit on 22/12/09 by CX]



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by Graybeard
 





My wife's brother lost both of his eyes and part of his brain to a sniper in Vietnam.


How unfortunate. My heart goes out to him. If it weren't for your wife, he never could have gotten care. How would he have filled out the myriad of forms if he could not see?

How could he have proven he did not have eyes, if he had no eyes?

Paperwork and BS loops to jump exist to screw vets out of care and education.



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