Where in America can you live a humble life?

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posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:16 PM
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I would like to live in the U.S.A where there is less government interference in your personal life, great star gazing, cool winter H40-59 L10-29 and warm summer H70-89 L40-59. I would like to live where there are not alot of racists, it is rather rural and dry, less air pollution, lots of woods and arid land around. If anyone knows where a place like this is please let me know.




posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:20 PM
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reply to post by Misoir
 


I doubt anywhere, isolated people get alot of hassles today.

Don't you know, your supposed to live a sex mad drug fueled life, just chasing pleasures. Your not supposed to be just wanting a quiet life.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:20 PM
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Well, if your going rural and forested there won't be many people around so by virtue of that there won't be many "racists".

Maybe it's my habit of avoiding people altogether that leaves me in the dark but I don't get where all these "racists" are.

I'd suggest here but the Winters are harsh and I'd rather not have anymore people move into this state.




 
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posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:30 PM
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Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
Well, if your going rural and forested there won't be many people around so by virtue of that there won't be many "racists".

Maybe it's my habit of avoiding people altogether that leaves me in the dark but I don't get where all these "racists" are.

I'd suggest here but the Winters are harsh and I'd rather not have anymore people move into this state.




 
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I know New Hampshire is beautiful but I am talking about out west somewhere like around the four corners. The reason you don't know racism is because you live in New England I know that there are not many racists in New England but I currently live in Saint Augustine, Florida where they call white people 'the crackers' because this is considered the Deep South. My mom was from Bethlehem, PA so that is why I don't like the southern lifestyle, especially not the accent. So if you know of any places out west preferably the four corners states that match my description please let me know.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:30 PM
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If you find that place, let me know. I'll pack my bags. I'm tired of the rat race. I've thought about moving to some island without anything at all. Ahhhh, some day.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Misoir
 




Where in America can you live a humble life?


Your life is your own. If you blame others for your misery, then you shall likely never find happiness anywhere.

A humble life is possible anywhere you are so long as you make the effort.

Don't let others determine what kind of life you lead. It is yours.

[edit on 19-12-2009 by redoubt]



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by redoubt
 



Not necessarily. Sometimes misery is forced upon you.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by KEMIK
If you find that place, let me know. I'll pack my bags. I'm tired of the rat race. I've thought about moving to some island without anything at all. Ahhhh, some day.


I was considering around Flagstaff, Arizona it is really rural, mountainous, forests, and has great weather and is renowned for its dark skies to be a star gazer.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:41 PM
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Go buy some land out near the Joshua Tree Highway. I've never felt so alone than when I hiked out there, and I've never in my life seen more stars. It has to be one of the most pristine skies in the world.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:41 PM
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Originally posted by KEMIK
reply to post by redoubt
 



Not necessarily. Sometimes misery is forced upon you.


It has always been so.

is your hair too long? Who do you worship? How much money do you make? Skin color, ethnicity, lawn upkeep... small mined people are everywhere in ever corner of the world.

If you let them determine your life, then you lose it to living in fear.

Be who you are, whoever that may be and don't be intimidated. Your victory will be yours and a light for others.



posted on Dec, 19 2009 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by redoubt
 


I agree with you there. But I really can't explain my point without getting personal. And not to mention it's a long story.



posted on Dec, 24 2009 @ 09:52 AM
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I don't know if Flagstaff has woods or the temps you posted....try out in the country of northern Florida for the best fit of what you mentioned....



posted on Dec, 25 2009 @ 11:42 PM
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So you are seeking a place to call your own.


I know where I want to live and for you to make that change, you must learn to like where you live now because if you don't, you will bring your problems with you.

For me and me alone
Austin is a place I want to be. Tons of cyclist, and tons of bookstores, and coffee shops. Oh yea, plenty of public transit.



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 02:08 PM
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I live in Vermont, and I love it. Granted, our winters last up to five months, but it's incredibly pristine and wholesome here. The people are a bit reserved, but honest, salt-of-the-earth folk who will always help you out when you're in trouble. The summers are beautiful and mellow -- there are lots of lakes and rivers you can swim in; and we have forests, green hills, fields, and waterfalls in abundance. And then there are our Indian summers, of course, when the leaves turn all shades of gold, orange, and brown, mixed in with the bright red of the maple trees. It's just absolutely breathtaking, IMO. Even though I've been living here for seven years now, I never get sick of it. I've been living other places before, e.g., Germany, Arizona (GREAT starry skies and landscapes!), Oregon, Washington, New Jersey, I really prefer this scenery. Vermont is also one of the most liberal states -- if you have kids, for example, you can opt out of vaccinations via "moral concerns." Our capital has about 4,000 residents, our largest city has approx. 38,000.

I like the slow pace of the native Vermonters; it's like they have their own clocks and calendars... nothing is being rushed. They're very earthy people, which I missed when I was living in beautiful but flaky Sedona, AZ. It takes a while to make friends here, since people don't open up immediately, but the ones you do get, you keep for the long haul, it seems. I like that better than the superficial friendliness of say, Sedonians, who accept you as their brother at first sight, but if you're in need, no one's there to help you.

Just my personal opinion.



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 07:56 PM
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My thoughts were almost the opposite of everyone else's. I was thinking almost anytown, USA. Almost every state I can think of has nice little laid back towns where one could make a good life.

It would be easier to simply tell where NOT to go. Obviously, don't go to a large city. If you want a mild climate, stick with the southern US coastline, or a couple of hundred miles from one. Just don't locate too far north. If you locate too far south, you'll miss the four seasons.

Almost all towns have web pages now, with photographs and demographics. I like university towns.


Don't be discouraged by some of these posts. There are many, many lovely little towns and hamlets in the U.S. Some of them are very affluent, and some more "working class", but most towns have a little of each.

Good luck, and what fun research!



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 01:57 PM
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reply to post by Misoir
 


This is what I recommend you do because I did it. But I still haven't moved yet.


The next time you have a week off, go to a place you think you will like. Spend about a week in that town, and go to the places that you yourself would normally go to when you have time off. Get a feeling for what is around and ask yourself, could I live here?

It is what I did a few years back. I went to plenty of places where I wanted to go, Like Dallas, Like Austin, Like Seattle, Sacramento, NYC and other places. I tried to spend as much time there as possible and the conclusion I came to, I want to be in Austin, TX.
Now if I can get a career that makes enough money so I can get settle there.



posted on Jan, 14 2010 @ 12:07 AM
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Originally posted by sylvie
I live in Vermont, and I love it. Granted, our winters last up to five months, but it's incredibly pristine and wholesome here. The people are a bit reserved, but honest, salt-of-the-earth folk who will always help you out when you're in trouble. The summers are beautiful and mellow -- there are lots of lakes and rivers you can swim in; and we have forests, green hills, fields, and waterfalls in abundance. And then there are our Indian summers, of course, when the leaves turn all shades of gold, orange, and brown, mixed in with the bright red of the maple trees. It's just absolutely breathtaking, IMO. Even though I've been living here for seven years now, I never get sick of it. I've been living other places before, e.g., Germany, Arizona (GREAT starry skies and landscapes!), Oregon, Washington, New Jersey, I really prefer this scenery. Vermont is also one of the most liberal states -- if you have kids, for example, you can opt out of vaccinations via "moral concerns." Our capital has about 4,000 residents, our largest city has approx. 38,000.

I like the slow pace of the native Vermonters; it's like they have their own clocks and calendars... nothing is being rushed. They're very earthy people, which I missed when I was living in beautiful but flaky Sedona, AZ. It takes a while to make friends here, since people don't open up immediately, but the ones you do get, you keep for the long haul, it seems. I like that better than the superficial friendliness of say, Sedonians, who accept you as their brother at first sight, but if you're in need, no one's there to help you.

Just my personal opinion.NFL Shop

really? I been there before, and I simply love that place

[edit on 14-1-2010 by Tiffany87]





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