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Telemarketing for charity?

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posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 08:06 PM
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I'm not sure how many people are aware of this sort of thing, but a short while ago, I had the opportunity to speak to someone that worked for one of those organizations. You know the drill, they call you up, seeming (usually) all cheery and "Good afternoon/evening Mr./Mrs. (Insert Name Here)." Then they proceed to tell you how YOU can help the Firemen/Soldiers/Police/Other Noble and/or pitiable organization, simply by pledging a small donation. Well, according to my associate, very little of your donations actually reach the organization in question. Supposedly as little as 13-15% makes it to the Firemen/Soldiers/Police/etc. While my acquaintance had little reason to lie, a quick google search turn up quite a few articles on this issue. Both of which are quite dated, but still gives an overall impression of the underhandedness of it all.

Here's one from Massachusetts: Link

And Hawaii: Link

I'm not certain how other people feel about this issue, but I thought I would share it with ATS, to raise awareness of the topic. Perhaps the reason I brought this to the attention of ATS is because it is so prevalent during the holidays. I would remember these articles next time you get a phone call, perhaps you should ask the telemarketer exactly how much of your donation actually goes to the people your donating it to.

Chrono




posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 08:26 PM
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This surprises you? Most "charities" have very little capital flow through to the nominal beneficiaries. Non-Profits are by far the best scam going.



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 08:36 PM
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reply to post by Doglord
 


Actually nothing really surprises me much anymore, thanks to this site, and a realist outlook. My first actual thought when I heard how it worked was: "That's interesting..."

Chrono



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 09:31 PM
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My rule of thumb for those sort of people is this:

If someone starts talking about Jesus the first time you ever meet them, run.

They only want in your pocketbook.

[edit on 18-12-2009 by Symbiote]



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by Chronogoblin

Actually nothing really surprises me much anymore, thanks to this site, and a realist outlook. My first actual thought when I heard how it worked was: "That's interesting..."

Chrono


Its also profitable. Mainly its a license to print money. There arevery few charities which aren't just excuses to give people feel good reasons to give you their money.



posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 10:25 PM
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I was a member of a small volunteer fire department and the county had a ordnance that any department in the county had to give permission for these fund raisers to ask for money for there departments.

If one of these telemarketers did it without permission they could be taken to court. and the judge would fine them the amount they had collected.

Every year another group of telemarketers that had not heard about the last group would call and try to collect money.
Our department got funded well.

The only aproved fundraising our department had was the yearly Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus lodge gathering( Clampout) with Clampers members from around the state coming to the small mining town i lived in.
en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 18-12-2009 by ANNED]



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