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nachash (hebrew) vs naga (sanskrit)

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posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 04:09 AM
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I have always been curious about the etymologies of the hebrew word nachash and the sanskrit word naga, both of which describe serpent-like beings. Are these words related, and if so, how? One comes from Hebrew while the other comes from Sanskrit.




posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 05:11 AM
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I wouldn't know, but i thought this might interest you:

Among the Kunwinjku speaking people of western Arnhem Land, and many of their neighbours, numerous Rainbow Snakes are said to populate the landscapes that make up their homelands. Two types of Rainbow Serpents consistently turn up in their oral history, mythology, ceremonies and painted art: Yingarna, the female Rainbow Serpent, is the mother, the original creator being; and the male Rainbow Serpent, Ngalyod, is the transformer of the land. They often live in deep waterholes below waterfalls.

www.aboriginalartonline.com...



posted on Dec, 15 2009 @ 06:30 AM
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Originally posted by husserl
I have always been curious about the etymologies of the hebrew word nachash and the sanskrit word naga, both of which describe serpent-like beings. Are these words related, and if so, how? One comes from Hebrew while the other comes from Sanskrit.

This caught my interest...but I am mostly seeing snakes...

It seems that the Hebrew nachash is used interchangeably with tanniyn.

Exodus 7:9-15 "When Pharaoh shall speak unto you, saying, Shew a miracle for you: then thou shalt say unto Aaron, Take thy rod, and cast it before Pharaoh, and it shall become a serpent (tanniyn). 10 And Moses and Aaron went in unto Pharaoh, and they did so as the LORD had commanded: and Aaron cast down his rod before Pharaoh, and before his servants, and it became a serpent (tanniyn). 11 Then Pharaoh also called the wise men and the sorcerers: now the magicians of Egypt, they also did in like manner with their enchantments. 12 For they cast down every man his rod, and they became serpents: but Aaron's rod swallowed up their rods. 13 And he hardened Pharaoh's heart, that he hearkened not unto them; as the LORD had said. 14 And the LORD said unto Moses, Pharaoh's heart is hardened, he refuseth to let the people go. 15 Get thee unto Pharaoh in the morning; lo, he goeth out unto the water; and thou shalt stand by the river's brink against he come; and the rod which was turned to a serpent (nachash) shalt thou take in thine hand."

nachash is also used interchangeably with saraph.

Numbers 21:8-9 "And the LORD said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent (saraph), and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live. 9 And Moses made a serpent (nachash) of brass, and put it upon a pole, and it came to pass, that if a serpent (nachash) had bitten any man, when he beheld the serpent (nachash) of brass, he lived."

nachash - meaning serpent, snake

tanniyn - can mean serpent, snake, sea monster, dragon or dinosaur, venomous snake

saraph - can be used for serpent, fiery serpent, poisonous serpent.

This is a bit interesting, saraph is also used for seraphim, the majestic beings with 6 wings, human hands or voices in attendance upon God.

I will look into the Sanskrit...




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