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i got a question about neatron stars

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posted on Dec, 13 2009 @ 12:07 PM
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now i have read that neutron stars and pulsars the matter is under such incredible gravity that the electron shells of atoms making up material of said star causing the neutrons to touch each other. supposedly a fist size piece would way tons. my question is if some of that material was removed from that extreme environment what would happen would it stay compacted and stable or would it decompress violently




posted on Dec, 13 2009 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by proteus33
 


It is my understanding that the neutrons are permanently fused due to those extreme forces. Here is a good thread on neutron stars, pulsars, and magnetars:

Neutron Stars, Pulsars, and Magnetars



posted on Dec, 13 2009 @ 12:35 PM
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Neatron......errr.....Neutron stars are ad hoc inventions used to invoke untenable scientific theories....

-Dev



posted on Dec, 13 2009 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by jkrog08
reply to post by proteus33
 


It is my understanding that the neutrons are permanently fused due to those extreme forces. Here is a good thread on neutron stars, pulsars, and magnetars:

Neutron Stars, Pulsars, and Magnetars


Great thread, I just read most of it. I see your drawing of a neutron star shows a crust. I found a source that talks about not only the crust, but perhaps about other layering effects, though I'm not sure how reliable the source is, or ANY source that speculates on the exact nature of matter inside a neutron star for that matter. We have less speculative observations about neutron stars like overall size and bulk density, but composition seems a bit speculative.


Originally posted by proteus33
now i have read that neutron stars and pulsars the matter is under such incredible gravity that the electron shells of atoms making up material of said star causing the neutrons to touch each other. supposedly a fist size piece would way tons. my question is if some of that material was removed from that extreme environment what would happen would it stay compacted and stable or would it decompress violently


Just like Earth has layers, such as the crust, then the deeper mantle, then the deeper core, so too do we believe that neutron stars also have layers.

Possibly helium atoms at the surface (the equivalent of the neutron star's "crust"). Then underneath that are atoms of heavy elements held together by gravity, and if you took these superheavy elements out of that gravity environment they would immediately fall apart on Earth.

Once you get to deeper layers, the neutrons start to leak out of the atoms and deeper still we think it might be some kind of superfluid of degenerate matter that we really don't understand too well so it's hard to say what would happen to it, but my thought is that if the unusual state is cause by gravitational forces, and you remove it from the gravitational forces, it will cease to be in that unusual state of superfluid degenerate matter when removed from those gravitational forces, and might as you put it, decompress, but that's just my guess.

Since we don't understand the exact nature of that matter deep inside the neutron star, it's hard to say exactly what would happen to it if removed from the neutron star.

invaderxan.livejournal.com...


material at the surface of a neutron star is believed to be made of regular atoms. No one's quite sure what though. Some think they could be iron atoms (one of the most stable types of atom), while others believe that iron atoms might "drown" beneath the surface, leaving only lighter atoms like helium. As you venture beneath the crust, you find atoms which are heavier and heavier. Unusual elements which belong underneath the bottom line of the periodic table. These nameless elements would fall apart in nanoseconds on Earth, but inside neutron stars, they're kept stable by the intense pressures.

Eventually you reach the delightfully named "neutron drip"; a region where neutrons actually start to leak from atomic nuclei. From here inwards, the actual atoms start to become smaller and smaller, immersed in a superfluid sea of neutrons and electrons. Eventually, by the time you reach the star's core, no atomic nuclei remain. Just a superfluid of degenerate matter. Actually, no one's quite sure what kind of matter would be in the core of a neutron star. No one's even sure if it would still be a fluid of neutrons. Some have even suggested cores of strange matter or quark degenerate matter.


This is an area of science where gathering observations or experimental evidence could be difficult as it's hard to even find neutron stars in the first place. Seeing inside them is harder so we rely on models but how do we know the models are correct?



posted on Dec, 13 2009 @ 04:28 PM
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A neutron star might have to develop a polarity and spin eventually.
There is just too much electrically active matter in the universe.
Electron pressure is reduced by the collapse sending electrons out
into space.

The White Dwarf has a small electron presence and thus a makes
a not too bright white star.



posted on Dec, 13 2009 @ 06:37 PM
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reply to post by TeslaandLyne
 


If the star it was formed from was spinning, then the neutron star is spinning, as its angular momentum would not be lost even by collapsing in on itself. In fact, it would speed up, like a figure skater bringing their arms in to their body when spinning (thanks, Carl Sagan, for that analogy!)



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