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What Kinds of guns not to buy

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posted on Dec, 18 2009 @ 08:53 AM
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reply to post by 11andrew34
 





I wouldn't be surprised if those little Para Ordinance guns were harder to set up and maintain than your average gun.


There's nothing "little" about it. It is a .45 ACP based on a 1911 frame and action, but with a double stack 14 rnd mag. If anything, it was too big for my hands, although I could shoot it with no problems.

Maintenance was easy. Mechanically it was flawless with an excellent trigger. It was almost too light. I could see someone having an accidental discharge if they weren't real careful.

I wouldn't want to use it in a fight, for that reason, unless I put in a lot of time at the range with various combat scenarios. All that stress and only God knows where the rounds would go. Even with that much range time and I still probably wouldn't consider it a primary handgun.

It just wasn't accurate. For the price, one would reasonably expect a more accurate firearm without having a gunsmith tweak it.


[edit on 18/12/09 by PSUSA]




posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 04:12 PM
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In an apocalyptic scenario, ammo type becomes a primary motivator... You want weapons that you'll easily find ammo for, therefore you want very common calibers, etc., such as the type used in law enforcement, military, so you can find stockpiles....



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Dont buy those who kill people those are bad



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by Iamherefornow
 


Glock spent a serious amount of time and effort developing their first handguns, that were 9mm. Their .40, .357, and .45 guns were an afterthought. They were not well designed, and suffer terrible reliability problems. I have seen firsthand the problems with a glock 21 in .45 acp, and a glock 35 in .40 s&W.

The .357 sig not a good round either. You are essentially taking a .40 S&W case and necking it down to 9mm. Guess what, a 9mm +p+ round is just as powerful.

If you want to take a step up from the 9mm, get a .40. But don't get a glock. I would get a para ord, P16.

Like Todd Jarret:


[edit on 21-12-2009 by downtown436]



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 04:26 PM
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Originally posted by semperfortis
reply to post by Iamherefornow
 


The Glock Model 21 45acp was one of the finest weapons I ever carried/owned..

Carried it for years, fired literally thousands of rounds through it, I can honestly not remember a malfunction.

My entire department carried them.

Fantastic weapon

Semper


Man, I had a friend that got a glock 21, brand new. That gun stovepiped, with every brand of ammo. You could only fire it about 5 times before it jammed.
He sent it back to glock, and they sent him a new gun completely, and it had the same problem. He wasn't limp wristing it either. He is a border patrol agent, and IDPA shooter. So no he wasn't holding it like 2Pac.

I don't know. If your entire department had them, with no problems, then maybe his was just a fluke.

I had a Glock 35, and it jammed all the time. I got rid of it and got a glock 34, and I have to say it is the finest handgun I have ever owned.



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 05:40 PM
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reply to post by 11andrew34
 


Agree with you 99% mate, but why I suggested using a target pistol to get your lunch over a rifle is purely that you may have to ride a bike or walk great distances to get to the game field and hence a very accurate S&W revolver with a decent sight on it makes sense. Absolutely anything over 50 yards is definitely a rifle's job.



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by downtown436
 


I have played with quite a few Glocks over the years and normally they are reliable if you feed the right factory ammo through them, how ever its out of the box accuracy is my biggest concern. They don't come with an adjustable rear sight ( big no no for accuracy ) and have the nickname of pray and spray at my club. Normally we see a new shooter with their Glock on the shooting line once or twice before they put it away and bring out their target 22. The Glock then only gets rolled out at parties or when friends come over because it has a kewl sounding name.



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by mazzroth
 


I use mine for IDPA shooting. And CCW lol.



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 06:14 PM
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Thank you guys for the advice. I am glad I bought just the Glock 9mm and no other. I had no idea the other models had so many problems. Mine has never jammed and thats why I bought it was the reliability of it, and the fact it has no safety persay. We have a lot of break ins where I live and I did not want a gun where I had to fool with safetys if someone was kicking in my door.
Originally the guy at the gunstore talked me into buying a 12 gauge he said that was the best home defense weapon. I am not too used to shotguns so I got rid of that, could not stand the recoil. Plus I have animals in the house and thought if I shoot this thing off in the house at an intruder I will probably take out the animals as well.



posted on Dec, 21 2009 @ 06:36 PM
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wwwooowwww-some good advise here but i will give my two cents worth since my uncle is a tool and die man who is a nra instructor--gun smith and gun maker and taught me more than anybody---for protection --never trust a semi-auto--jams when you dont want it to---a revolver in 357--or 44cal is what you want---most modern--[-mine is ruger red-hawk-in 44cal-]---i can keep one in chamber without having to worry about it--it is smooth and the cylinder alignment is right on---cheeper revolvers wear out and timing can be off as to shave lead off the bullet as it is fired from cylinder to barrel--mine will shoot through a wall or car door if need be with fully jacketed bullets==my pistol is alsostainless steel so exterior rust is never a problem-----in rifles --again -an autoloader is not reliable--BY FAR THE BEST RIFLE IS --to me the remington7600 carbine in 30-06 caliber--you can easy get ammo for it and it will kill anything around---i would challange anybody to shoot faster than me with semi-automatic-----remember if ya have a auto that jams alot usually it is the extractor---worn or not cleaned --if it cant get a grip on the empty case and pull it out of chamber then it doesnt matter how many shells are loaded behind it---DONT EXPECT TO BUY A FULL AUTOMATIC---UNLESS YA WANT YEARS OF HASSLE GETTIN THE LICENCE--[-WHICH MOST CAN STILL GET by the way]--AND HAVE A LOT OF MONEY FOR SHELLS---GATLIN GUNS ARE LEGAL BY THE WAY IF THEY ARE NOT MOTOR DRIVEN----FUN TOO -SAYS MY UNCLE WHO SHOOTS MANY AUTOS--I HAVE NOT- YA RIGHT!!!-----SOMETHING to really consider is bullet proof vests-----THERE IS NO SUCH THING---any high powered rifle or pistol with solid jacketed bullets will blast right through----small caliber pistol shooters should aim for base of neck or low in the gut----criminals do wear vests ya know---even the ones with stars on them-----BUT MOST OF ALL SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY---if anybody wants to shoot go to a gun range and find somebody to teach YOU!---start with rifles -for hand guns are the most easy to have a accident with-----too easy to point in the wrong direction-----great shooting--and no horseplay--------slightly downhill with a gentle cross breeze and light snow falling---lets hunt



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 01:19 AM
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Originally posted by downtown436
reply to post by mazzroth
 


I use mine for IDPA shooting. And CCW lol.


How do you go up against the SVI's, STI's and CZ's ?



posted on Dec, 22 2009 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by mazzroth
 


There aren't a lot of double stack 1911 people in IDPA. IPSC is a different story. I do like to win, but is see IDPA as a good way for some other people to set up some awesome stages and, for me to get some good practice.



posted on Dec, 30 2009 @ 02:58 PM
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reply to post by Mortimer452
 


Personally, for a good smaller, older gun that is going to keep firing even after I am dead I would suggest an old Makarov 9mm. As far as a .45, the 1911 is "god" but gods lesser know brother is the Ruger P97. Built like a tank, and less $. The downside to the Ruger is the size (a little bulkier than the 1911)

My 2¢



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 02:14 PM
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reply to post by itsawild1
 


Um, my clean semi-auto is much more reliable than a dirty revolver.

The best gun to have is the one you have.

I loved my S&W 686 in .357, but for the same space my 686 and 6 rounds took up, I can carry my FNP and 48 rounds.

Guns are machines. Machines have to be cleaned and maintained. I can guarantee that a well-maintained semiauto will be more reliable than a neglected revolver.

Certainly there are brands of semi-auto that are crap, as have been mentioned in the thread.

But, if someone was looking for advice I would say go to a range, rent some guns and shoot as many different ones as you can before relying on anyone else's advice.

Learn to shoot properly and safely, and above all learn the proper way to clean and maintain your weapon from an experienced shooter.

There is a reason that the 1911 will turn 100 years old next year. John Browning's designs were genius and if well-maintained will still be around in the next 100 years.



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by emsed1
 


Very true about the 1911 about to turn 100 years old... but let's not forget the venerable Colt SSA was first made in 1873 and their (If taken care of) every bit as reliable as they day they were made 137 years later...

[edit on 4-1-2010 by DaddyBare]



posted on Jan, 4 2010 @ 11:52 PM
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The only problem that I know if with Glock (any cal.) is to NOT use reload ammo. The ceramics in the construction of Glock rely on the brass of the shell to be solid to fire properly and contain/focus the blast.

Once you fire a shell, the brass expands slightly. On some weapons, (mostly with all steel construction) this isn't a problem. They simply contain the extra lateral force that comes off of the expanded brass and focus it back down the barrel.

On a Glock however, it can blow right out of the receiver or at the start of the barrel and mushroom it...causing all kinds of problems for you and yours.

I've never heard of this failure killing anyone, but I have heard of it doing significant damage to a shooters hand. I also believe Glock states clearly in their manuals not to use reload ammo.

Stock up on it now, cause you never know what you might come across as salvage if SHTF



posted on Jan, 5 2010 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by midnightbrigade
The only problem that I know if with Glock (any cal.) is to NOT use reload ammo. The ceramics in the construction of Glock rely on the brass of the shell to be solid to fire properly and contain/focus the blast.

Once you fire a shell, the brass expands slightly. On some weapons, (mostly with all steel construction) this isn't a problem. They simply contain the extra lateral force that comes off of the expanded brass and focus it back down the barrel.

On a Glock however, it can blow right out of the receiver or at the start of the barrel and mushroom it...causing all kinds of problems for you and yours.

I've never heard of this failure killing anyone, but I have heard of it doing significant damage to a shooters hand. I also believe Glock states clearly in their manuals not to use reload ammo.

Stock up on it now, cause you never know what you might come across as salvage if SHTF


Ceramic is not used in the construction of Glocks. That is a long standing myth that originated with Bruce Willis and the Die Hard movies. If any ceramic components exist, they are aftermarket.

Glock is working on this. Maybe??
www.glock1911.com...



posted on Jan, 6 2010 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by jibeho
 


You know what man? I stand corrected. I has always heard about ceramics and what not being the problem but you are absolutely right. I looked it up and bam. Found out the real reason. I was correct about the brass and all, but its not because of ceramics its because the Glock doesn't hold the whole case. I found a quote that I'll post here. Thanks for the correction man.


"Glocks don't fully support the case during firing, most notably on their 40SW guns -- supporting the case full-length is important because the brass is NOT meant to contain the pressure of firing the shot by itself -- it's a carrier for the powder, not a pressure vessel. Glock counts on the strength of the case to be "good enough" at least for one firing of standard pressure ammo. They seem to get away with it most of the time, with catastrophic exceptions. Glock's 40SW guns are pretty well known as hand-grenades with anything but UNDER-loaded rounds (in short, in a rush to market, Glock based their 40SW too tightly on their 9MM, and the result really CAN'T handle the extra pressure). Glock strongly recommends that you don't use reloaded ammo, and I think this is a big part of that -- ultimately, reloading weakens the brass by stretch/sizing cycles, and due to Glock's design, you may be staking your life on that weak brass. Also, if the reloader makes a moderate mistake that causes overpressure (eg. loading even slightly too much powder or overcrimping, both fairly common among beginning/high-speed reloaders), Glocks won't forgive that mistake as well as other guns. This writer himself once made a DOUBLE load 45ACP and my HK USP handled it without incident beyond belching fire 20 feet. I doubt Glock could have handled such a SERIOUS mistake that gracefully."



posted on Mar, 21 2010 @ 03:17 AM
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I think it depends on the nature of the survival situation. If you are in a wildernes survival situation you probably don't need a pistol. If you are occupied by foreign troops, or tyrranical domestic troops, any gun will do as it will help you get a better one if you play your cards right.



posted on Mar, 21 2010 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by Flidais
I think it depends on the nature of the survival situation. If you are in a wildernes survival situation you probably don't need a pistol. If you are occupied by foreign troops, or tyrranical domestic troops, any gun will do as it will help you get a better one if you play your cards right.



Only partly true...
As a few have already mention (Myself included) some guns are more of a danger to their owners as they are to their targets...

A few have pointed out the Jennings Nine 9mm to stay clear of... what they didn't say is the Jennings has a nasty habit of firing when the safety is engaged, (Decocker still strikes the firing pin)

So you cant really say "Any Gun will do in a survival situation." there are a few that simply work better as a hammer than they do a firearm



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