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Strange Dream of a Frozen Navy:

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posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 11:52 AM
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I was surfing the web and came across a very interesting story that I thought some of you might enjoy. This is the story of Geoffrey Pyke and Project Habbakuk.




Geoffrey Pyke - An Eccentric, Quirky Inventor. Like many British eccentrics, Geoffrey Pyke at first appears normal when viewed through Who's Who, but a closer examination always starts the head shaking. Not to say that Pyke didn't give his all and then some to the war effort - not at all. But it also would be incorrect to say that what Pyke did give could be called, at best, quirky - and, at best, bizarre.



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Apprehended trying to sneak into Berlin during the first World War, Pyke was sentenced to a prison camp. By noting that sunlight momentarily blinded his guards every day at one certain location, Pyke managed to escape, becoming something of a celebrity by accounting his daring escapades after the war.





Assigned to the War Office during the second great conflict, Pyke threw himself into devising all kinds of clever (and even often practical) means of aiding the war effort. Stretcher-carrying sidecars for motorcycles? That was Pyke. Pedal-powered shunt cars for railway yards? Pyke. Marking a special motorized cart British commandos were to use with "Officer's Latrine" in German on them -- so the Nazi's would leave it well alone? You guessed it ... Geoffrey Pyke. Disguising British agents as avid golfers, and then sending them all throughout Germany to secretly gather signatures on a poll to convince Hitler that his people didn't want to go to war? You guessed it. Like I said, quirky at best.






The Problem: Counter the German Submarine Fleet But the concept that propelled Pyke from simple, fascinating, oddity to the military limits of the delightfully absurd was the one he hit on while pondering one of the great problems of the Second World War: that allied shipping was being literally cut to pieces by the merciless, and precise, German submarine fleet. Even Kaiser with his smooth assembly line of cheap shipping couldn't compete with the appetites of the Wolf Packs. What was needed, Pyke considered, was some kind of strong military presence, a way of providing air cover for the desperately-needed merchant ships.




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But there were a lot of Liberty Ships, far too many to cover with even a token fleet. Not only did those transport need protection, but they needed cheap and easy protection, something simple to assemble, able to carry long-range aircraft, and not so expensive as to draw valuable resources from the battle fronts.

It would be easy to imagine Pyke sipping something cool when inspiration struck. But what really causes the head to shake is to remember that Pyke was a great British eccentric, and Brits (as anyone who has visited the UK can attest) are completely alien to anything tall, cool, and – especially - frosty.

Maybe it was watching winter slabs majestically move down the Thames, or pale masses of crystals sluice down a gutter, but whatever the inspiration, Pyke had his vision. But before it could be put into anything even close to reality, Pyke had to solve one fundamental problem: ice melts.






Pyke's vision was a marvelous, gloriously absurd one: 300 feet wide, 2,000 long mid-Atlantic runways. Displacing 1,800,000 tons of water (26 times the Queen Elizabeth), they would carry aircraft, munitions, crew, and - naturally - a refrigeration system that would guarantee that their 50 foot walls wouldn't fall to their greatest enemy (even more than Germany): heat.

These iceberg battleship/aircraft carriers would have been the stuff of nightmares: massive white slabs of steaming ice, churning through the sea, a flurry of aircraft and support ships darting around their bulk. The Germans, my guess, would quake in fear more from the audacity and insanity of their concept than any weapons they could carry.














But these tamed bergs wouldn't just depend on their mass and aircraft to defeat the German hordes. No sir, these were fightin' icebergs! Pyke envisioned a special system mated to the refrigeration equipment so the bergs could spray out supercold water, literally freezing enemy forces in their tracks. Code named Habbakuk after a character in the Bible known for saying: "Cast your eyes over the nations and be amazed, astounded. For I am doing something in your own days that you would not believe if you were told it" (Hab 1:5)


"The Habbakuk" size comparisons:
- with normal ships:





- with the Statue of Liberty:









But there was that big stumbling block to Pyke's incredible plans: his terrifying, freezing giants of the sea would turn to mid-Atlantic slush before ever encountering the Germans. The humiliation alone of having to scream for help as your ship literally melted around you was more than any sailor should ever bear. So, how to make nature act ... unnaturally?






New Bizarre Material - Pykrete. The answer actually came from Max Perutz, who named it after Pyke: take 14% sawdust and 86% water, freeze, and viola: a bizarre material you can saw like wood and won’t melt. Well, okay, it actually will melt, but just a helleva lot slower than regular ice.

Pyke was so excited by this frosty invention that he showed the stuff to Lord Mountbatten, who was so similarly afflicted that he rushed into Winston Churchill's bathroom and in a scene too close to Monty Python to be anything but real, dropped a block of the stuff in the PM's bath water. Maybe it was the audacity, the lunacy, of the idea, or some unknown properties of Pykrete, but Churchill caught the bug: Pyke and his iceberg navy got the go-ahead.


(Continued...)


[mod edit: fixed title]

[edit on 11-12-2009 by 12m8keall2c]

[edit on 11-12-2009 by TV_Nation]




posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 11:57 AM
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Building the Monster- A site was found, a secret boat-house on Patricia Lake in Jasper, Alberta, Canada, and a small-size test was organized. Pyke was ecstatic as his materials were assembled into a model of his cold revelation. As a testament to either Pyke's brilliance or the twisted humor of the universe, the ice ship was a complete success: in other words, it didn't melt all through a hot summer.












Alas, the landings at Normandy made the ice ships unnecessary. It's easy to imagine Pyke, face beaming in joy, standing on the frigid deck of his dream ship, envisioning its monstrous kin rolling through surging seas, throwing cascades of freezing death at the German Navy, just as somewhere else in the world the war was turning away from needing their frightening, protective presence.

As to what Pyke did after the war, it's hard for me to say: his strange dream of a frozen navy lasting longer than anything else he contributed. But one thing I can guarantee: Pyke could never see the onset of winter without thinking of his great ships, and the battles they might have won.


www.darkroastedblend.com...



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by TV_Nation
 



S&F

And Fascinating read!
Makes you wonder what's goin on today with our military that we dont know



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 01:45 PM
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Wow! This is very interesting stuff. I wonder how they were able to mix water and sawdust to a freezing point and keep it homogeneous.

I wonder if this could be a low cost building material in places where ice abounds? Of course, those places tend to lack trees to make the sawdust.

Thanks for posting this!



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 01:46 PM
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reply to post by TV_Nation
 


What an odd, yet fascinating account.

I guess it does make sense, I mean, they do have Ice hotels now.

Wonder if they have ever considered using this type of idea for anything modern involving military....



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 02:16 PM
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Mythbusters did a show on this not too long ago. They made a speed boat out of the pykrete. I dont remember how it ended or what have you, but I do remember the boat floating for a while.



posted on Dec, 11 2009 @ 08:22 PM
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Originally posted by zlastonetoknow
Wow! This is very interesting stuff. I wonder how they were able to mix water and sawdust to a freezing point and keep it homogeneous.

I wonder if this could be a low cost building material in places where ice abounds? Of course, those places tend to lack trees to make the sawdust.

Thanks for posting this!



I think this would most definitely be a low cost building material when you compare it to the price of steel considering just the cost of the material and then adding the cost of fabrication.

I don't think the location of the sawdust would be a problem considering that steel needs to be manufactured.

I just wonder how long one of these ships would last and what it would take to keep it frozen.



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 05:45 AM
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reply to post by TV_Nation
 


Wicked thread man, this is the second thing I've learned from you today and both were fascinating.

Hoping this wakes this thread up a bit S&F



posted on Apr, 16 2010 @ 04:16 PM
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reply to post by ItsallCrazy
 



Thanks for the response and glad you liked it.



posted on Apr, 18 2010 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by KiliRae
Mythbusters did a show on this not too long ago. They made a speed boat out of the pykrete. I dont remember how it ended or what have you, but I do remember the boat floating for a while.


They made a super pykrite version using water soaked newspaper rather than sawdust. The boat held together, though it still melted way too fast for it to work for extended periods without a refrigeration system.

It was pretty impressive stuff.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 05:46 AM
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That is a fascinating story, one of which I have never heard before! I can only imagine in an alternate universe, these things ripping through the Atlantic shooting penguine guided suicide torpedoes and eskimos loading bombs on ice planes. Fantastic stuff!

I would laugh if on it's maden voyage it ran into a cruiseliner and sunk. It's like the anti-titanic.



posted on Apr, 19 2010 @ 10:11 PM
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Originally posted by Blood Eagle
That is a fascinating story, one of which I have never heard before! I can only imagine in an alternate universe, these things ripping through the Atlantic shooting penguine guided suicide torpedoes and eskimos loading bombs on ice planes. Fantastic stuff!

I would laugh if on it's maden voyage it ran into a cruiseliner and sunk. It's like the anti-titanic.


Now that would be a sight lol! Don't mess with Eskimo's and their penguin guided torpedoes it just won't end well



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 03:08 PM
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It's amazing but this stuff is the real deal. When you see the strength of Pyke's mixture you will see that he wasn't that far off base.

External Video Link



posted on Apr, 23 2010 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by axiomuser
 


That's an interesting video and it shows just how strong the material can be. I found it cool that as the outer layer melts it actually insulates the inner layer.

If these ships were used in places with very cold temperatures I think they could have actually functioned quite well.

Thanks for contributing to the thread.



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