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Chem Trails in Central Massachusetts

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posted on Dec, 8 2009 @ 06:59 PM
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reply to post by whereismyfather
 

The temperature at the surface has nothing to do with the temperature at the altitudes at which the planes are flying. It takes very cold temperatures (below -40º) to produce contrails. These temperatures usually occur at altitudes of greater than 25,000 feet. While less common in the summer months than winter, they do occur, usually preceding the arrival of a front.




posted on Dec, 8 2009 @ 07:18 PM
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reply to #pid7676826]post by Phage
 


thankyou phage, once again, for injecting your sanity dna into this host.

those pictures are indeed contrails. tsk tsk.

i see them near every clear day over newton, ma due to our

location under a few Logan flight paths.



posted on Dec, 8 2009 @ 07:27 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I seem to recall a prediction Phage made, which I agreed with, that there would be more "chemtrail" threads in winter.



posted on Dec, 9 2009 @ 08:25 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Phage,

I am watching the video that ChemBreather posted on Chem Trails and Con Trails. My question to you and others is, How long, depending on high altitude weather, does a Chem Trail last? When I took these picture I did see a con trail that disappeared and the line did not get longer. But most of these trails did not evaporate.

Any input would be greatly appreciated so I can avoid any confusion in future postings. I am a novice at this.

Thanks!



posted on Dec, 9 2009 @ 09:10 AM
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reply to post by whereismyfather
 


I'm the wrong person to ask. I don't believe in "chemtrails". But I can tell you why some contrails last longer than others.

There are two reasons why contrails can exhibit different lifetimes. Different jet engines do have different characteristics which can affect the way the contrails form. But the main reason is that, as I said before, atmospheric conditions vary at different altitudes. It takes the right combinations of temperature and humidity to form contrails which persist and spread. Persistent contrails can last for hours.

It is possible for a layer of air which is likely to produce persistent contrails to be only a few hundred feet thick (or less). A plane (or planes) in that layer will produce persistent contrails while those in a different layer will not.


contrailscience.com...



posted on Dec, 9 2009 @ 10:08 AM
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This must be the conspiracy that has most nutcases. I like this hilarious and ridiculous theory, it's fun to see how incredbly stupid some people are.

Why do people try to reply seriously, it's just like feeding the trolls.. Let them conspire and let them breath their *cough* chemtrailed air..



posted on Dec, 9 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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Man I'm new here but I keep learning more and more everyday! Thanks for the pictures



posted on Dec, 9 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by OzWeatherman
 




Someone has a program which shows altitudes and locations of air traffic somewhere, i will try and remember who it is



I think that might be me, Oz.

For the OP (and everyone else reading who lives in North America) you can visit this site to view air traffic live in your area.

A few tips on usage: Depending on where you live, select an airport nearby. In the United States, ALL the major airports with passenger service will begin with the letter 'K', and usually followed by the same three-letter code you see on your baggage tags when you fly. The website will interpret for you too...just type in the cityor airport name, and follow the instructions.

Another thing to keep in mind --- the contrails (and yes...that is ALL they are, despite the breathless nonsense put out by the likes of people like 'Carnicorn') ... the contrails only form at higher altitudes. SO, just because you may live near a major airport, or under the "flight path" (routes airplanes fly when landing or taking off), you won't be seeing contrails from airplanes arriving and departing that airport. You are seeing airplanes cruising by, at altitude, with destinations hundreds of miles away from where you are.

The website info should be self-explanatory. The radar targets are tagged with data blocks indicating the airline, flight number, altitude and groundspeed...and whether they are climbing or descending at any given moment.

If needed, I can write an interpretation on this thread.

Here's an extra bit, for more advanced users: The high-altitude Jet Airway structure is available for viewing and download here.

This is a source for pilots, so it's more technical.

Just like the Flight Aware site, put in an airport four-letter ID. An aviation chart will appear...similar to the home page default. This is a VFR (Visual Flight Rules) chart, for low altitude navigation purposes.

Along the top, in white tabs, you will see "Enroute H-XX". Those are what you want to click, to see the high altitude Jet Airways.

Once you know where the Airways are located, you can compare what you see in the sky by plotting them over any map of your local area you choose to use.

The results will depend on your ability with computers, and your willingness to realize that "chemtrails" as shown in the photos in this thread, do not exist. They are simply contrails, being mistaken for something else, because of a persistent bunch of baloney that predominates the Internet.

Deny that sort of ignorance.



posted on Dec, 9 2009 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by whereismyfather
reply to post by Phage
 


Phage,

I am watching the video that ChemBreather posted on Chem Trails and Con Trails. My question to you and others is, How long, depending on high altitude weather, does a Chem Trail last? When I took these picture I did see a con trail that disappeared and the line did not get longer. But most of these trails did not evaporate.

Any input would be greatly appreciated so I can avoid any confusion in future postings. I am a novice at this.

Thanks!


Like I said, the wind was well over 130 knots up there when you took these pictures, its actually a great example of how high winds can disperse and expand contrails



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