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Giant 13 billion year old Galaxy found at edge of the known universe

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posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:27 PM
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Giant 13 billion year old Galaxy found at edge of the known universe


science.blogdig .net

....The galaxy, which is 12.8 billion light-years from Earth, is as large as the Milky Way galaxy and harbors a supermassive black hole that contains at least a billion times as much matter as does our Sun.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.dailygalaxy.com




posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:27 PM
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Ok i find this extremely interesting and didnt see one thread on it when i checked. (also sorry if this is the wrong sub forum but i believe it fits here pelase move it wherever it seems ideal)

I ran across this about 10 minutes ago and it states that a 13 billion year old galaxy (yes 13 BILLION) which as the scientists clearly state "is as old as it gets" the interesting thing is that it's the same size as the milky way and way more dense but we are more than likely seeing the dead light of it which means it was swallowed up in the huge black hole or supernova'd into submission.

The fact mankind has found it suggests that our viewing range is increasing dramatically, It amazes me that we have detected such an old galaxy, what else is out there?

What are your thoughts on such an old find?

science.blogdig .net
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:38 PM
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S&F !

A few thoughts....If someone or thing were on a planet in that galaxy and had the same equipment would they be able to see our galaxy? Or could they not because our galaxy wasn't formed yet? Or because they have long since been sucked into the black hole? And if that is the case, where did they go


We are SO small & insignificant.



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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neato.... now what?


btw... I think our universe is far larger. anyone think that?



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by Signals
 


Thank you


and my thoughts exactly it raises the question that if something from that far out (if it's still alive) would be literally multi billions of years more advanced than us would be able tos ee our galaxy from there.

So relatively closer galaxies like Andromeda should be able to see us clearly.

I deeply believe right now that as i type this star systems across our galaxy or even the known universe are taking pictures of our solar system wondering the same as us "Are we alone?".

Last night was a beautiful clear night and i was watching the stars and i felt so small and insignificant as you stated, but i also got a sense that i'm not the only one thinking that on this planet or on a distant planet.

I wish people looked up to the stars more, the world would be better for it.

anyways back on topic



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by Signals
S&F !

A few thoughts....If someone or thing were on a planet in that galaxy and had the same equipment would they be able to see our galaxy? Or could they not because our galaxy wasn't formed yet? Or because they have long since been sucked into the black hole? And if that is the case, where did they go


We are SO small & insignificant.


If it still exists .....the light from this galaxy is 13 billion years old....so we looking at the galaxy as it did 13 billion years ago...its probably just a black hole now or gone altogether.

[edit on 7-12-2009 by loner007]



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:48 PM
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reply to post by Jordan River
 



Oh it's far bigger possibly so big it's endless, if i remember right "we" as in mankind can only see 5% of the universe, one day in the distant future we will see so much more than that.

I have deep faith in mankind i feel we will get over the differences at some point and realise at last that we are all one. Although i can also see an Empire of Terra in the making, it's man's destiny to go deep into space and once lightspeed technology is developed or wormhole technology it will come a lot swifter. Although i worry for what we may find or do on other planets. Man's greed is our biggest downfall.

that new "Avatar" film is a good example of what i mean.



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by loner007
 


Yep that's eerie to think about that we are looking at the echoes of an ancient galaxy in which trillions of beings may of perished



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 05:46 PM
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reply to post by Raider of Truth
 



The fact mankind has found it suggests that our viewing range is increasing dramatically, It amazes me that we have detected such an old galaxy, what else is out there?


This galaxy is probably about as far away that we can see in the optical part of the spectrum.

We have to wait for new telescopes like the James Webb Space Telescope that will be launched in a couple of years, to be able to look at the redshifted infrared from the really early stages of the universe - around the first 400,000 years of the universe. We will then hopefully discover the building blocks of early galaxies along with origins of dark matter & dark energy. We may be able to see the ionised hydrogen gas that we predict to be some of the first forms of matter in the universe, and hopefully we can then work our way back to understanding the big bang for real, and where it all came from! Exciting times that we live in!

[edit on 7-12-2009 by john124]



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 06:02 PM
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i think the age of the Universe is much greater - more like trillions of years.



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 06:10 PM
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if its 12.8 billion light years away, were seeing it as it appeared 12.8 billion years ago. and they wont see us, for another liek 7 billion years, if the earth is 5 billion or so years old.



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 06:10 PM
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Yet another reminder of the amazing: our amazing ability to detect such incredibility,

incredibility?
lol, is this a reputable source?
just asking


Anyhow, how much radiation does a supermassive black hole emit?
if it's supermassive it may have eaten up planets, so ALOT of radiation must be emitted. Can it so much that it's very detectable, more than usual?

Also i'm guessing it determined it's age through redshift, which as i understand a so-so way of measuring age.

Interesting article though



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 06:26 PM
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To be honest, I'm surprised more people don't know this. For example our galaxy has it's own satellite galaxy Sagittarius dSph, which is on the opposite site of our milky way spiral arm.

Out side of that one are two more, SMC and LMC, both Hubble type galaxies, meaning they were discoverd by our Hubble telescope.

There are multiple galaxies in a very close proximty as far as galaxies go, which are a part of our galactic cluster. Of course when I say "very close proximity", I'm going by the galactic close of being within parsecs of each other. Only a few megaparsecs away exists an entirely different galactic cluster.

Micro galaxies, which are a part of our cluster or as I call them galactic constellation, dot the areas between our satellite galaxies. For example, Sculptor dSph ESO 351-30, and M 101 NGC 5457 UGC 8981 MCG 9- 23-28 or even Carina Dwarf a hubble type E3 micro galaxy.

These and a multitude more all range within 1 mega parsec of our galaxy. We have many galaxies as our neighbors. Out of those galaxies, which ones have life simular to our form of life, I do not know.




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