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Panic Attack - causes, cures.

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posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by St Udio
 


You said it better than I could have. Thanks. Sorry for the one liner.




posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by brilab45
The first anxiety that was noted by the psychologists (as a spin-off of hysteria) was a woman who feared she couldn't stop herself screaming obscenities at passers-by from her window. She never did, but she was convinced that she might.
It is the fear of anxiety and the panic attack.
Is it a fear and conspiracy against the self from the sub-conscious?



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 05:03 PM
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Originally posted by brilab45
reply to [url=http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread524810/pg1#pid7665678
 


You said it better than I could have. Thanks. Sorry for the one liner.



Uh-Oh.... you are aware that putting ( . ) periods in a string of words
does no make that reply a two liner ?!


Naw... i'm just trying to raise your eyebrow !

in an addition... my mother-in-law, 91, was in a stage of psychological distress ~ on the verge of going into a full fledged Panic-Attack ~

I'm still not satisified that my talking 'Bertha' out of the pre-panic stress was the proper thing to do.
Perhaps She knew that there was a 'clot' floating in her bloodstream...and that intuitive 'feeling' Bertha had...knowing that 'something' was amiss...
was the true nature of things and she was content & resigned to have but a short future.

and I was focusing on the 'Panic Attack' as a stress causing thing.
all this was some 2 months before 'Passing Away' (15 July '09)


One thing i know for sure, I can not fill the shoes of a Hospice, End-of-Life counselor



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


I think they misdiagnosed that lady. I believe what she has is Tourettes?!



If I get to core of my anxiety, I find its the anticipation of physical discomfort either from pain or from badly managed blood pressure. Having trained myself well in anxiety, I now get anticipatory anxiety.

You know, I used to think people were crazy when they said they had panic attacks. Totally in their head, right? When you get your first one, you think the world will end.

As a veteran panic attack survivor, I realize I'm not going to die from the anxious feelings and stay in control. Again, I monitor my blood pressure. If it shoots to high........off to the ER.

[edit on 6-12-2009 by brilab45]



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by brilab45
 

From what I've heard people with anxiety often end up in emergency rooms with suspected heart or ashmatic problems.
Tourettes is also often considered.
I think the fear of losing control is displaced on physical maladies.
Strangely, many people with anxious "pseudo ashtma" develop real ashtma shortly afterwards.
Even stranger, after I tested HIV-poz people around me came down with Shingles and TB. Coincidence?



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 05:36 PM
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reply to post by halfoldman
 


That is very strange. When I found out I was poz in 1986 everyone disapeared!
Go figure.

For people who don't understand anxiety......If your heart is not hurting, your not having severe headaches, you are probably having a panic attack. You will feel all the symptoms of having a suspected heart attack without the pain. But no matter what.........go to the ER. Don't take chances.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:05 PM
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By the way did you know that most and some flus and parasites can be the cause of Panic Attacks?



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:11 PM
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reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


No. Never heard of that. Parasites? Then there might be hope for me? I'm going to google that. Do you any information to back that up? I would greatly appreciate that.
Thanx.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:25 PM
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I suffer from really bad anxiety attacks too. I've heard that each person feels it differently, my hands go numb, my heart races, i sometimes lose sight completley, sweat, throwing up (if its a big one) small ones are just hearth palpitations and tingly hands.

First attack was when i was 20 and just living out of home and lost my job (maybe it is a fear of earning your own keep eh?
) due to glandular fever. I thought i was dying, although i didnt go to ER (fear of hospitals :/), just went home and took it easy (was out at dinner) then got some blood tests done the next day, but now i'm 25 and they are still there, i've been tested over the years just to make sure there isnt anything causing them when a new one comes along, but eventually you realise that its pretty much all mental, you just have to tell yourself that it's not a big deal, you can breathe through it and make sure you have things like water and in my case an inhaler because i have asthma, and funnily enough attacks trigger it too, i panic about not being able to breathe, then i have an attack and can't breathe. Ha. I refuse to take medication to stop it because the things they tend to put you on do alot more harm then good.

Plus about OP's theory, i havent yet met an Elderly person that suffers them, besides my mother and father who have depression & anxiety and they are only 52 & 53, the only other people i know that suffer them are about 22, 26 & 29 years old. My Grandfather was in the clean up with hiroshima, and he was a messed up man when he came back and apparently not nice to be around, but as far as i've been told, no anxiety (he did die of cancer due to the radiation) My grandfather on the other side has not been through either war, has has TB, Collapsed lungs multiple times, emphysema, scarlet fever, but never a panic attack or anxiety, he's actually the most chilled man i know.

So i think it's more genetic &/or due to other causes then an elderly generation thing.

[edit on 6-12-2009 by bkaust]



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:28 PM
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Originally posted by brilab45
reply to post by Agent_USA_Supporter
 


No. Never heard of that. Parasites? Then there might be hope for me? I'm going to google that. Do you any information to back that up? I would greatly appreciate that.
Thanx.



Yup parasites are hidden within your stomach or at least abdomen once parasites start to grow as fully adults they eat out your neutral body energy which you need.

And also some parasites can eat our blood without knowing until the the last moment.



I wouldn't trust the stool testing for parasites anymore they usually and always turn up 100% negative, i have Parasites because i had symptoms of one.

last year after my visit to the ER my family went home and then later the second day i felt like my head was burning i went in bed, my family checked the fever, it wasn't a high fever just a medium fever.

The fever stayed just for 2 days, it was horrible.




Oh just so you know my heart is healthy my heart was checked out allot by doctors at the hospital and also when i was young.


Some said parasties dont make any sounds?
thats wrong i some parasites can make sounds, in which it will make you think its your own stomach that its the making the sound.



If you think you got parasites please check it with more blood testing, blood testing is a lot better stool testing in some cases.


For the above poster, i will find the info later.

[edit on 6-12-2009 by Agent_USA_Supporter]



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:39 PM
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Hey there's new stuff when I hit reply...cool!

Anyways...Why our generation? I tend to think there are lots of reasons.

First, caffeine. People these days are so hopped up on coffee, cola, red bull, etc. - if we could harness the energy of twitching we could power the world.

Second, over-stimulation from lack of sleep, hectic schedules and endless, over-whelming media saturation. We seriously need to un-plug.

Third, as someone above stated, underlying medical issues are exacerbated by all of the above. Mitral Value Prolapse for one, so many people have it and don't even know it, plus it's aggravated by stress. CoQ10 people!

I remember the one and only panic attack I had. I was driving from my home town to ATL. Leaving behind all of my family, my friends, my neighborhood, my favorite bars and many other old haunts and habits. But I had to go, my path traveled elsewhere, and I ended up in an ER in Greenville, AL.

It sucked but I got over it with time and made a new life for myself. Perseverance and patience are virtues long discarded in a world hooked on instant gratification.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:45 PM
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reply to post by bkaust
 


Sorry to hear about your troubles bkaust. I do understand your reservations about not taking the medications. But low dosage benzodiazapines for a short duration will make you feel better. You dont' have to take them everyday like I do. Only when you feel it coming on.

How many panic attacks do you have a month? A real good alternative is Hydroxyzine. It's much like benedryl and calms you down. Makes you pretty sleepy. Definitely won't make you addicted. Google it.

I have stopped and started (xanax) with no problems under the guidance of my psych. Talk with your psych. and see what other solutions are available to you. Anyone taking more than 4 mg of Xanax a day is headed for addiction in my humble opinion. I share your suffering and feel bad for you.

You know, I don't know of any of my older family members ever having anxiety either. But then I do recall in the old days they had "fainting rooms" in their houses. Were those panic attacks? HMMMM!



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 06:47 PM
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I have once experienced something that i suspect is a panic attack. Out of nowhere i got something i thought was a stroke or heart attack. I thought i was gonna die...

I almost passed out, but i fought the feeling. Finally when the feeling did not go away i went with the ambulance to hospital, where they sat me down to wait for 6 hours... Then i got fed-up with waiting and said screw em and went home


While waiting i started realizing it was probably a panic attac, and when i controlled my hyperventilation everything settled down. Everything was caused by respiratory asidosis i think.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 07:08 PM
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Originally posted by brilab45
reply to post by bkaust
 


Sorry to hear about your troubles bkaust. I do understand your reservations about not taking the medications. But low dosage benzodiazapines for a short duration will make you feel better. You dont' have to take them everyday like I do. Only when you feel it coming on.

How many panic attacks do you have a month? A real good alternative is Hydroxyzine. It's much like benedryl and calms you down. Makes you pretty sleepy. Definitely won't make you addicted. Google it.

I have stopped and started (xanax) with no problems under the guidance of my psych. Talk with your psych. and see what other solutions are available to you. Anyone taking more than 4 mg of Xanax a day is headed for addiction in my humble opinion. I share your suffering and feel bad for you.

You know, I don't know of any of my older family members ever having anxiety either. But then I do recall in the old days they had "fainting rooms" in their houses. Were those panic attacks? HMMMM!



thanks for the response! I don't know if what i have now often are panic attacks, but it's pretty much anxiety about going out in general now, and mainly just the heart palpitations and numb hands, but i still have a bad one every couple months, i was initially put on Zoloft because i suffer depression as well, but that made me really sick so she stupidly put me on 75mg of Effexor which is the WORST med ever (won't go into detail but # was i angry at my doctor for giving me those!). All she could say after both meds was that i apparently am more likely to suffer side-effects then most. helpful!

So i weened myself off that over about 4 months thank god, my mother takes aropax i think it's called for anxiety about 25mg so i might try that, i've just lost respect for my former doctor and want to find a new one i can trust before trying a new med, most of them just seem to want to throw any script at you nowdays!

I'd prefer natural remedies, but i'm hopeless at taking anything on a regular basis so taking the low dose for a short time might be the good solution! as much as i hate to say it i depended on smoking marijuana for a long time because it was the only thing that helped my mind just stop, but due to my asthma that's something that i had to stop that too, plus worrying about long term mental health. So at the moment i'm just trying to get fitter to stop them too, i thought if i was physically stronger (due to the depression and meds my weight ballooned) so i've lost 20kgs, but the anxious feeling is still there.

I havent seen a psych yet either because they are a little expensive are we are cash poor because all this has left me unable to work, but i'm looking into some that take medicare to talk to, but then i have to let down the anxiety about talking to a stranger!


It really feeds on itself though doesn't it! Thanks again for the reply, and i've looked up Hydroxyzine and next time i go to the GP i'll make sure to ask some better questions rather then taking what i'm handed!

I have not heard of a 'fainting room' before - but it does sound handy!



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 07:16 PM
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reply to post by bkaust
 


On another note regarding anti depressants.........people who are antidepressant medication resistant do much better on bi-polar medication. I take Lamictal with no problems, not like those evil anti's. It also makes me calm and a little bit flat emotionally.



[edit on 6-12-2009 by brilab45]

[edit on 6-12-2009 by brilab45]



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 08:42 PM
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I have been plagued with panic attacks since 1992. When they first started I thought I was dieing and had no idea what was happening. After several trips to the dr. he said I had a chemical imbalance, and prescribed Alprazolam and
Paxil.

I started feeling much better so I decided to stop taking alprazolam and quit cold turkey, Boy did i ever pay for it. I was very lucky i was working and my workplace had a medical clinic when i went into withdrawals from the drug.

I have never experienced anything like the withdrawals I had and just lucky I had some of the pills "aprazolam" with me. The nurse made me take one and I came through it ok. Two days later the nurse told me that I was very close to going into a seizure and could have died.

I am no longer taking them but I am still on the anti-depressant. I want to quit taking the drug, However several drs. have told me that I need to stay on the pills. I have overcome the panic attacks with the help of a good psychologist..who taught me to breathe slowly through the nose and exhale slowly through the mouth.. After a little practice the attacks now last but seconds when they used to last minutes.

I tried to wean myself off of the anti-depressant but the Hell I go through with withdrawals are worse than the medicine...



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 09:13 PM
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Panic attacks, anxiety, depression. That's the diagnosis I got 3 years ago after finall going to my GP to try to get some answers to what was wrong.

My first ever panic attack came when I was out fishing in the boat with my hubby. In fact, when I look back there was no reason for it to have happened a all, I wasn't worried & the day was calm.
Yet, the feet started to go tingly, & the hands, the tongue started to swell, & before I knew it my hands were totally "clawed" & I was unable to speak, stand or even use my tightly clawed hands! Well, if that didn't set me off & freak me right out, I dunno what would.
Do not remember much after that, but the mind meltdown happened & I passed out, vomiting when I came too about 10 minutes later. Hands still clawed, feet still numb, but I was now able to speak.

Didn't go to the Emergency, it was a weekend & hubby just never took me there- didn't think it was necessary ( a bone of contention in our relationship ever since! )


Anyway,the next 2 years was simmilar, on & off, & no real obvious reason for the panic attacks, just when they came on it was horrendous---those clawing hands ( and fet if I had no shoes on ) just freaked me out. Not to mention not being able to breathe.

So, Dr diagnoses Anxiety & Depression & I am prescribed Effexor, 35mg eventually over the course of the 2 years I went right up to 150mg. They seemed to work, but any mention of going to talk to a Counsellor about my condition would instantly set me off into another episode!!!

One day about 4 months ago I decided that it was time to go off the medication, which was tough, but after 3 weeks of coming off slowly I was weaned--yes, there were side effects including nausea, dizziness, but that as temporary.

Well, I am 1 week out of major surgery ( to my upper body ) & am now in the recovery stages. I am fine, & if I was going to have another "attack" it would have definately been either in Pre-OP or while waiting for the Anesethist to give me my "knock out gas".
Nothing. I appear to no longer suffer from Panic attacks, anxiety, & I guess I now have the same levels of depression as the rest of the population of this planet---normal & managed.

So while I don't like to be on medications for altering mind patterns, I do have to say that without Effexor "redirecting & reprogramming" my brain "patterns" I may be in a much worse situation that I am right now.

Sorry about the long winded post
, but just wanted to add my perspective.

Lastly, I've never taken recreational drugs & haven't had alcohol for 12 months or more. I also NEVER drink Red Bull, V, or any of those strange drinks that don't actually make sense to me.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 11:30 PM
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The best advice? Focus. That's it, just focus on anything positive, even if you have to find a positive memory to focus on.

Two years ago my young teen daughter began to have panic attacks, so I rushed her to the ER where they gave her an injection and she slept like a baby for three hours.

The next episode happened christmas eve when she was deeply concerned about whether or not her mother would contact her.... meaning that she did love her.. in my girl's eyes. The girl focused on those thoughts and the Feelings created by them until she was hyperventilating, etc.

I told her people having panic attacks do not have the breath or energy to yell at anyone.. since she was yelling at me during this "attack". In the end I did what people used to do in the old days. My daughter was claiming she oculd not see nor move her arms, so I slapped her. Surprisingly she could move her arms and see very well!!



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 08:21 AM
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Apparently Panic Disorder has been around quite some time. This will take multiple posts:

Introduction

Panic disorder is new to the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), but it has been written about for quite some time.
One of the earliest reports of the disorder was back in the 17th century, when Robert Burton, an English clergyman, described it in his book, The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) as "[a] fear [that] causeth in man, as to be red, pale, tremble, sweat… It amazeth men that are to speak or show themselves in public". During the 1800s, panic disorder was first described in medical documentation, when a Civil War physician named Jacob De Costa described symptoms similar to those of panic disorder in soldiers after the fighting had finished.

Sigmund Freud is widely considered to be the first major psychiatrist to study the disorder in depth. He coined the term anxiety neurosis, and this was the term that was used to describe the disorder for over half a century.

It appeared in the DSM-I and DSM-II this way. The leading researcher in the field during the 20th century was Donald F. Klein, who, in the middle of the century, first demonstrated the use of anti-depressants to avoid recurring panic attacks. Then, in 1980, the DSM-III came out. It listed panic disorder as a separate disorder for the first time.

An Attempt to Define Panic

Many different people have defined panic disorder in many different ways over the years. Sigmund Freud wrote the first clinical definition:

"… an anxiety attack… may consist of the feeling of anxiety, alone, without any associated idea… or else some kind of paresthesia… may be combined with the feeling of anxiety, or, finally, the feeling of anxiety may have linked it to a disturbance of… bodily functions- such as respiration, heart action, vasomotor innervation or glandular activity."A panic, or anxiety, attack, as described by the American Psychological Association, is defined as a "…sudden surge of overwhelming fear that comes without warning…".

The symptoms listed by the APA include a racing heartbeat, difficulty breathing, paralyzing terror, hot flashes, and a fear of impending death or insanity. The first 2 editions of the DSM defined only one kind of anxiety disorder, as mentioned earlier. By the time of the DSM-III publication in 1980, it was broken up into 2 different diseases: panic disorder and general anxiety disorder (GAD). The major difference between the two is that panic disorder sufferers experience anxiety only during the panic attacks, while GAD sufferers experience anxiety all day, every day.

Non-Psychological Symptoms and Side Effects

Panic disorder is unlike other mental disorders in that it causes physical harm and side effects as well as psychological harm. Because of the cardiovascular symptoms of the disorder, such as heart palpitations and irregular heartbeat, panic disorder sufferers are 30-40% more likely to suffer from mitral valve prolapse, a serious heart condition, than members of the general population. Panic patients also tend to go in for expensive surgeries, mainly coronary and abdominal in nature, more often than non-panic sufferers do.

To be continued.......



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 08:29 AM
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They make up 20-30% of patients who go in for coronary arteriography surgery, even though they tend to not need it. They also have a higher risk for migraines and severe headaches. According to a recent study, nearly 28% of all individuals between 24 and 29 years of age who visited a physician for headache had a history of panic disorder. The cause for these migraines is usually not discovered by the medical doctor, because his training is in a different area. Generally, because of these superfluous visits to the doctor, people who suffer from panic disorder visit the doctor or hospital much more frequently than people without it do. This not only ties up the doctor from dealing with patients who need medical help (as opposed to psychological help), but it also makes the panic sufferer’s medical bill much higher than the average person’s.

The Causes of Panic Disorder

The cause of panic disorder had been theorized in different ways over the years. The causes seem to vary from person to person, but the two major reasons are biology and heredity.

Biological Reasons for Panic Disorder

Psychologists with a biological approach to their field have their own explanation for what causes panic disorder. According to these biological psychologists, people who suffer from panic disorder suffer from a lack of the neurotransmitter serotonin in their brains. Serotonin is the neurotransmitter that regulates sleep, mood, and appetite. Everyone has serotonergic fibers that travel through the amygdala and the hippocampus. These are the regions of the brain that interpret sensory stimuli, like fear. People with panic disorder usually have damaged serotonergic fibers in their brains, causing a flaw in the way their brains interpret the sensation of fear. They suddenly experience fear, even when there is no fear to experience.

Hereditary Factors

Various research by many psychologists has yielded evidence that flaws in both dominant and recessive genes are significant causes of panic disorder in the children of parents with panic disorder. Many different kinds of studies have been done to confirm this. Some of these include family studies, in which the genes of different members of a family are compared; twin studies, in which twin babies are studied for their genes; and linkage studies, in which DNA links from parents are compared to DNA from their children. All results seem to point to a genetic cause for the disorder.
There is not one main cause. Both of these factors play a significant role in the cause of panic disorder.

Treatment

Because there is not just one cause for panic disorder, treatment for the disorder varies from person to person. No research has been done as of yet to determine which method of treatment is best.
There are 2 major methods of treatment that have been proven to work better than any other method: the use of antidepressants, specifically tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) to increase the level of serotonin in the brain; and the use of serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for the same purpose. Different methods work for different people and no research has been done as of yet to determine a link between the cause of the disorder and the medication.

Conclusion

The knowledge we have on the subject of panic disorder has increased fairly rapidly since its admittance into the DSM in 1980. Despite all of the progress made in the field, we still have a long way to go before a full understanding is reached. The quality of treatment of panic disorder has room for improvement. As of 1996, only 18% of panic disorder patients recovered from their disorder, and of that 18%, there was a 60% relapse rate.
An increase in the caliber of treatment is the next step in the long battle to fight panic disorder.

Source: www.googobits.com...




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