It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The 2001 Clear Channel Memorandum: Banned Songs

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 11:35 AM
link   
Not sure why this happened, but a few nights ago, I had a strange dream which recalled the banned playlist or "graylist" on all Clear Channel and affiliate radio stations (over 1,200+). So for the past few days, I have scoured the Internet researching this executive move which Clear Channel proclaims never existed.


It appears that a majority of the songs banned have references towards Fires, Suicide, Blood, Evil/Devil, Flight, Planes and New York itself [among other topics].


Link to Clear Channel's Memorandum: en.wikipedia.org...


Apparently this all started the day after September 21st, when Neil Young performed John Lennon's song "Imagine" on the broadcast musical benefit telethon "America: A Tribute to Heroes".





So it came to be that an executive at Clear Channel Communications was circulating among its more than 1,100 affiliate radio stations a list of songs deemed questionable for airplay in light of the attacks, a link to a Web site (www.yellow7.com/imagine) began to circulate on the Internet grapevine. At the site, an excerpt from a song that was part of the Clear Channel graylist (it's not quite a blacklist, since it's voluntary) played over images from the Sept. 11 attacks and their aftermath, with each photograph perfectly keyed to a song lyric for maximum emotional impact. The song was "Imagine," by John Lennon. In various guises on the Internet, remixed with quotes from President Bush or covered by unknown home-studio musicians, "Imagine" quickly became the soundtrack of hope in the wake of Sept. 11. Chief among its many attractions is this verse:

Imagine there's no countries

It isn't hard to do

Nothing to kill or die for

And no religion too

Imagine all the people

Living life in peace



Other songs banned from Clear Channel:
- Elvis Presley: "(You're the) Devil in Disguise"
- Elton John: "Bennie and the Jets", "Daniel" & "Rocket Man"
- Guns N' Roses: "Knockin' on Heaven's Door"
- Lenny Kravitz: "Fly Away"
- Led Zeppelin: "Stairway to Heaven"
- Beastie Boys "Sabotage" & "Sure Shot"
- The Beatles: "A Day in the Life", "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da" & "Ticket to Ride"
- Frank Sinatra: "New York, New York"
- .... and the list continues and continues.



The point of my post is this: How and why did we Americans allow this to happen without protests or banning these radio stations ourselves? If they were to allow this to happen again, do you think its appropropriate for us to idly standby without repercussions?

Consistently, we have allowed our government to walk all over us. It is no wonder why Senator Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) and others wish to ban the Internet because this is our main outlet to obtain mass viewings to get our messages across. But still, I truly find that the majority of people simply want to work their 9-5 jobs, pay their taxes, and go to bed ... living a hassle free life.

The snowball effect has been in motion. There Is No Stopping The Machine!

I want you to share this "graylist" and this story with those you love and care about. Remind them of Clear Channel's actions and the government influence which took effect. We should never forget how creative freedom through music was taken away from us for several months.

If we forget, they win.


Referenced Material:
- www.thrasherswheat.org...
- www.nytimes.com...
- en.wikipedia.org...
- www.youtube.com...




posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 11:39 AM
link   
As a private company they can 'ban' whatever they want. Makes me wonder if some Aussie's are making the companys decisions on bans.


CC can always be boycotted and there are always other sources for the music. At least until government steps in with its own bans. Makes me nostalgic for Tipper Gore and some 2 Live Crew.



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 11:43 AM
link   
reply to post by Quazze
 


Wait..

People still listen to the radio?



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 12:15 PM
link   

Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
As a private company they can 'ban' whatever they want. Makes me wonder if some Aussie's are making the companys decisions on bans.



Well, I am sorry that you and countless others feel this way.

And just for the record, Clear Channel Communications (NYSE: CCO) is a publicly traded company, not a private or privately held corporation.




Privately-held companies are - no surprise here - privately held. This means that, in most cases, the company is owned by the company's founders, management or a group of private investors. A public company, on the other hand, is a company that has sold a portion of itself to the public via an initial public offering of some of its stock, meaning shareholders have claim to part of the company's assets and profits.

One of the biggest differences between the two types of companies deals with public disclosure. If it's a public U.S. company, which means it is trading on a U.S. stock exchange, it is typically required to file quarterly earnings reports (among other things) with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). This information is also made available to shareholders and the public. Private companies, however, are not required to disclose their financial information to anyone since they do not trade stock on a stock exchange.


But let us not get off topic.



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 12:27 PM
link   
reply to post by Quazze
 


Sorry if you didnt know what I meant by private company but being publicly traded just means it's liable to shareholders not obligated to some PBS type governmental control. Doenst have any bearing as to whether or not the company can pick and choose songs to air.



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 01:02 PM
link   
Yeah, you are right. I am so sorry for being such an idiot to think that banning music after September 11th meant something (especially by main stream media). Maybe I am too tired to think.

Sorry for inconveniencing you and everyone else with my random blabber. Maybe it is best that I just remain a viewer and not contributor to posts, since I clearly am not on the same page as you.



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 01:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by thisguyrighthere
reply to post by Quazze
 


Sorry if you didnt know what I meant by private company but being publicly traded just means it's liable to shareholders not obligated to some PBS type governmental control. Doenst have any bearing as to whether or not the company can pick and choose songs to air.


And again, for the record, you are wrong. It is a public company, not private. You need to realize that. Stating which songs they can or cannot play has absolutely no bearing on being private or public (I get that). But don't say they are a private company, when clearly they are not.

They are a publicly traded company that makes private decisions. Is that what you wanted to say but failed to type if out accordingly?

Thanks again for getting this topic off course. You truly are a gem to this site.



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 01:24 PM
link   
reply to post by Quazze
 


i think he made a very valid, and very true point, with no intent to derail.


if what he said was derailing...get ready to be completely thrown off track!

a company (in this case a broadcasting company) has every right to play or not play whatever they want, and in this case, SUGGEST! (underscore bold caps) their stations not play certain songs. They did not say we willnot allow these. they just said..hey..s up...these songs may be a bit hard for people to swallow right now. is it stupid? yes. but whatever...it doesn't hurt a damn thing. despite what you are trying to insinuate, it just doesn't hurt anything.

there is no conspiracy here. it's not like they were banning songs that said 9/11 was an inside job. they said knockin on heavens door may make people a little too emotional. so what?



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 01:44 PM
link   

Originally posted by Quazze
Not sure why this happened, but a few nights ago, I had a strange dream which recalled the banned .....


Stop right there. You did not do ANY research if you think there was a "BAN". Your source actually states this!


The 2001 Clear Channel memorandum is a document distributed by Clear Channel Communications to the over 1,200 radio stations they owned, shortly after the September 11, 2001 attacks, containing a list of a large number of what the memo termed "lyrically questionable" songs.


Read further how SNOPES did REAL research on this and came to the same conclusion.

your claim:

FALSE



[edit on 5-12-2009 by ImAPepper]



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join