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WARNING ! Gold at $1224.10 and rising fast.. Chinese dumping US DOLLAR !!

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posted on Dec, 3 2009 @ 05:47 PM
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Originally posted by brocket99
Heres what's really happening.

Everyone who owns gold is saying to buy gold. Just like everyone who was making tons of money in the stock market or real estate wants you to buy their product.

Golds bubble will burst, and the common man who is holding the bag and bought at the highs will lose their shirt. Just like every other manipulation in our history. Is that now? $2k an ouch? $3k? $1500?

Now is the time to sell and buy other things on the cheap. Including US dollars.


Goodness gracious, thats absolute madness, you are joking right?

wow, I, I just don't have the words to.....wow

good fun




posted on Dec, 3 2009 @ 05:50 PM
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reply to post by vermonster
 


he must be a hired troll! i think we should all block him from having an opinion with the ignore button. Asinine



posted on Dec, 3 2009 @ 05:57 PM
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What are the Chinese and Indians buying their new gold with? They using their currency our ours?



posted on Dec, 3 2009 @ 06:08 PM
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Originally posted by liveandletlive
What are the Chinese and Indians buying their new gold with? They using their currency our ours?


doesn't matter. the reason it sinks the dollar is b/c USD is seen as a safe haven for so many years, treated just as gold, so safe and stable in value. The fact that the dollar is being dumped for gold means gold up dollar down. If more countries use gold instead of $$, dollar takes a big hit.



posted on Dec, 3 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by vonholland

Originally posted by liveandletlive
What are the Chinese and Indians buying their new gold with? They using their currency our ours?


doesn't matter. the reason it sinks the dollar is b/c USD is seen as a safe haven for so many years, treated just as gold, so safe and stable in value. The fact that the dollar is being dumped for gold means gold up dollar down. If more countries use gold instead of $$, dollar takes a big hit.


It would also be another way to dump the dollar. Buy metals, real estate, and energy, basically anything you can trade out of the dollar with that has value. If you spread it out, you could dump the dollar and drop your reserves of it in a controlled manner.



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by TrueTruth
 
Even that fertilizer example is not hyperinflation


Apparently you missed the first part of my last post? I plainly said that hyperinflation right now is scattered and sporatic. You'd call it hyperinflation too if you were a farmer!



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 12:55 AM
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reply to post by thewind
 


As everyone is unsure on the gold market, here are some training videos that show
HOW THE FINANCIAL MARKETS WORK...

www.youtube.com...

www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...
www.youtube.com...



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 02:45 AM
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Originally posted by vermonster

Originally posted by brocket99
Heres what's really happening.

Everyone who owns gold is saying to buy gold. Just like everyone who was making tons of money in the stock market or real estate wants you to buy their product.

Golds bubble will burst, and the common man who is holding the bag and bought at the highs will lose their shirt. Just like every other manipulation in our history. Is that now? $2k an ouch? $3k? $1500?

Now is the time to sell and buy other things on the cheap. Including US dollars.


Goodness gracious, thats absolute madness, you are joking right?

wow, I, I just don't have the words to.....wow

good fun


No this is not what is happening!

Everyone who owns paper stock in gold is telling everyone that they need to buy paper stock in gold. Yes the paper stock gold market will crash.

But what China, US, Russia, India and every other Government out there is doing is saying that the Paper stock gold market is going to crash, which it will, But each and every one of these governments are buying every last scrap of real hard gold they can get.

They are doing this because all global paper currency will be default a few years from now. When this happens the top governments that now own actual gold will clean their books and the new global currency will be GOLD!!!

But hey don't listen to me, I only have Dollars and I depend on people not knowing it's worthless in a few years so I can buy food.



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 02:50 AM
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Hubby brought this up, but, how stupid does the US think China is.... Of course they are going to notice there is a problem with the Gold???
What Country in their right MIND wouldnt notice, it would have come out eventually......!!!!
What is the real motive here!

[edit on 4-12-2009 by The_Seeker]



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 03:50 AM
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Originally posted by thewind
reply to post by TrueTruth
 
Even that fertilizer example is not hyperinflation


Apparently you missed the first part of my last post? I plainly said that hyperinflation right now is scattered and sporatic. You'd call it hyperinflation too if you were a farmer!




There's a definition for hyperinflation. I posted it for you. What you posted, isn't it. People don't use the term to describe individual products - it refers to the above mentioned rate increases occurring across the board. To arrive at the definition, all goods and services in the entire economy must experience a mean increase in cost, for consecutive months, of at least 50%. 'Sporadic' increases, here and there, are specifically not what it refers to. It's meant to connote an economy-wide phenomenon. The definition is specifically crafted to NOT refer to individual products, sectors, etc., because there are many, many reasons why costs of an individual product can rise. For example, if there were a fungus that devastated our wheat crop, prices of food might spike. Even if they did, and even if it were by 200%, that wouldn't meet the definition, because it wouldn't be an aggregate price increase caused specifically by money printing.


You don't get to personally decide what a word means when it already has a definition. I can call my dog a cat, but she isn't, and people are going to look at me funny if I insist.

But it doesn't really matter. The problems are still the problems no matter how we label them, right?

It's just that if you go around using that term to try and talk to people about what's going on, they're going to tune you out when you start using that kind of patently incorrect and hyperbolic terminology.

***

Since you used fertilizer as your example, I'd thought I do a little looking into why prices are rising.

From this year:

www.lookatvietnam.com...

Looking back 2 years:

agri-view.com...


As you can see, this is a simple supply and demand issue. It is not a result of monetary policy. As such, it does not meet the definition of inflation, let alone hyperinflation.






[edit on 4-12-2009 by TrueTruth]

[edit on 4-12-2009 by TrueTruth]



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 03:50 AM
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why do i keep getting double-posts?

sigh

stupid computer.

[edit on 4-12-2009 by TrueTruth]



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 05:31 AM
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so if /when the dollar collapes, will they then institute the "AMERO"?



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 06:30 AM
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reply to post by TrueTruth
 
There's a definition for hyperinflation. I posted it for you. What you posted, isn't it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sorry, but I beg to differ with you on this one. The biggest catalyst to hyperinflation is the mass printing of money. Well, this has been done already, about 5 or 6 times. The 2 bailouts, one of over 800 billion, then the other 787 billion, and all those stimulus checks sent out. Now, according to this one online dictionary, hyperinflation is just what I said it was:585-gold.com...
"Hyperinflation: A hyper inflation is caused by a massive production of money. Money is getting less and less worth. In such times people prefer investing in tangible assets, like precious metals or properties."

There are many different definitions for hyperinflation, all which affect the way america's economy reacts. That's why I said as of right now, it's sporadic and scattered. It's kinda like what CNN's Ali Velshi said once about the difference between a recession and a depression.

When your neighbor is layed off from work, that's a recession, but when you get layed off, that's a depression!One more thing to remember also, and that's hyperinflation is also defined when a commodity or good to be purchased stays at 50% above it's regularly normal purchase price for a period of 12 months, and that's economics 101, which plainly shows it with the price of gas.

Gas 7 years ago was about $1.50, and now it's steady at around $2.65. Hmm, that's over a 50% increase for a period of the last 3 years, but hey, whadda I know, I am just an ole dumb hillbilly!



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 06:52 AM
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Originally posted by thewind
reply to post by TrueTruth
 
There's a definition for hyperinflation. I posted it for you. What you posted, isn't it.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sorry, but I beg to differ with you on this one. The biggest catalyst to hyperinflation is the mass printing of money. Well, this has been done already, about 5 or 6 times. The 2 bailouts, one of over 800 billion, then the other 787 billion, and all those stimulus checks sent out. Now, according to this one online dictionary, hyperinflation is just what I said it was:585-gold.com...
"Hyperinflation: A hyper inflation is caused by a massive production of money. Money is getting less and less worth. In such times people prefer investing in tangible assets, like precious metals or properties."

There are many different definitions for hyperinflation, all which affect the way america's economy reacts. That's why I said as of right now, it's sporadic and scattered. It's kinda like what CNN's Ali Velshi said once about the difference between a recession and a depression.

When your neighbor is layed off from work, that's a recession, but when you get layed off, that's a depression!One more thing to remember also, and that's hyperinflation is also defined when a commodity or good to be purchased stays at 50% above it's regularly normal purchase price for a period of 12 months, and that's economics 101, which plainly shows it with the price of gas.

Gas 7 years ago was about $1.50, and now it's steady at around $2.65. Hmm, that's over a 50% increase for a period of the last 3 years, but hey, whadda I know, I am just an ole dumb hillbilly!


Dude - I know that it involves the printing of money. I said so in my post.

And no matter what you say, the definition refers to the AGGREGATE rise of prices - a mean of all goods and services - not to a particular product. There's no such thing as 'sporadic' or 'scattered' hyperinflation.

And the example you gave, fertilizer, rose due to supply/demand issues, not currency issues. Gas didn't go up because of monetary policy either. And no, that link's definition you gave is not what you said - it says nothing about sporadic or scattered - which again, just isn't how it works.

And you're also missing the exponential function of compounding price increases, meaning, that the 50% increase happens each month. (I have no idea where you get this 'for a year' thing, which is most certainly not economics 101.)

Let's take your gas example:

Price starts at 1.50 ... the increases would look like this-

Month 1) 2.25
Month 2) 3.38
Month 3) 5.06
Month 4) 7.59
Month 5) 11.39
Month 6) 17.08

Are you seeing what I'm saying? Each month sees an increase of 50% of the price of the previous month - it's not just a price going up and staying up.

Truthfully, the 50% figure is arbitrary, and when you look at famous examples, it's worse

Examples of Hyperinflation-

www.economicshelp.org...

— The most severe month of hyperinflation occurred in Hungary in July 1946 when prices increased by 4.19 quintillion per cent (4,190,000,000,000,000,000 %)

— In the same year the Hungarian National Bank issued a 10 quintillion pengo note (one followed by 19 zeros 10,000,000,000,000,000,000)

— During the hyperinflation episode in Germany from 1922 to 1923, the Weimar Republic printed postage stamps with a face value of one billion marks, as prices doubled every two days. At one point in 1923, the exchange rate equalled one trillion Marks to one dollar

— In Yugoslavia prices increased by 5 quadrillion per cent between October 1, 1993, and January 24, 1995


Lots more here:

en.wikipedia.org...



Why does the term refer to an aggregate phenomenon? Because if the currency is the issue, there's no reason for certain sectors of the economy to be effected and not others. It doesn't make any sense. If the money gets devalued, all prices go up.


Consider this too. This is a chart of inflation over the past 9 years.

Do you see hyperinflation? Highest rate of inflation was 2008, at 3.8% , and so far, 2009 has actually seen slight DEflation.

www.usinflationcalculator.com...


I don't know how much clearer it can be.







[edit on 4-12-2009 by TrueTruth]



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 07:48 AM
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Originally posted by jimmyx

ok..if i take what you say, is actually going to happen...how would a person say, with 50,000 cash, use that to their benefit???


Well, I am no financial advisor so I hesitate to offer financial advice. I can tell you what I would do, but that may not be what is best for you.

I would buy physical gold holdings - coins, bullion, kuugerands, jewelry etc... Holding a contract for gold is meaningless as I am willing to bet that you could never execute. This wouldn't be as a traditional "investment" for a return, this would be to safeguard wealth - a reserve if you will.

I would also use some of that money to plan for my family's needs: food, water, medicine, clothing etc... Civil disorder is the biggest threat we are facing today. In short, I would arm myself in any and every way possible.



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 07:56 AM
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it seems that it's dropping pretty damn fast

EDIT: 1191,40

[edit on 12/4/2009 by HarryCat]



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by TrueTruth
 
I use to get double postings also once in a while. Gremlin in the machine?



posted on Dec, 4 2009 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by TrueTruth
 
"And the example you gave, fertilizer, rose due to supply/demand issues, not currency issues. "
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am not disagreeing with you about hyperinflation per-say, I am disagreeing with you on the fact that hyperinflation is and can be both sporadic and scattered.

The fertilizer issue I used, I used that one because fertilizer was not a supply and demand issue at all. Fertilizer went up because the cost of fuel, material to make the fertilize with, and state and federal taxes went up on the purchase price at the local distributors by more than 450%. The farmers actually used less fertilizer. So, that sorta trumps the demand versus supply that you tried to impose because eventhough less fertilize was purchased, the purchase price has never dropped!

You say the currency issue was not a factor? Sorry to burst your bubble there, but it was, for the supplier of the nitrogen was china and south america for the eastern seabooard where I live here in virginia.

Now to address the gas issue you tried to exemplify. Your figures were way off because there was no steady influx of a reduction or an increase. What you displayed there was simply a conundrum of fictional gas pricing wars that is typical when local stations are battling their competitors.

The price of oil is what controls gas prices, and the euro is the mainstay of the petro dollar right now, to which the american dollar is worth less than right now. While I applaud your effort to try and maneuver around my point, I am not in disagreeent about hyperinflation overall with you, it's just that you're diasgreeing with me on the targeted areas of this monster, which make it just what I said it was, sporadic and scattered.

The reason I know quite a bit about the farming issue here is the fact that I am a farmer, and nowadays farmers must take classes on not only the ag business in general, but they gotta pay close attention and recognize the fluxuations of economics in order to make their business more profitable.

They watch the chicago exchange just as much, and if not more than the idiots on wallstreet do. Matter of fact, just a few months ago, hyperinflation in operating overhead was the topic of the last farmers co-op meeting. It was discussed at how targeted inflation played a key role in the buying and selling of beef cattle, which is a large part of why cattle prices are down right now. But hey, what do I know, I'm just an ole goober!



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 12:29 AM
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You guys whet my appetitie to join a finance forum to learn more past what is discussed here. Any financial forums I can join that would help my learning along?

Apologies in advance for the OT question.



posted on Dec, 5 2009 @ 07:08 AM
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reply to post by thepixelpusher
 
www.financialtimes.net
www.discusseconomics.com...

those 2 are a good place to begin. enjoy



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