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Contine teaching kids "wrong"??

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posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:24 PM
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I thought I would throw this out there as the idea popped in my head last night while helping my son with his homework. His project related to how the Egyptians built the pyramids. I asked him a few questions about what he is learning about the pyramids and he explained that they were made for previous rulers and it took thousands of people to move the blocks. Interested, I asked how they moved the blocks there and he said that the teacher explained they used sleds and animals. I told him that was fine (he's 9 - 3rd grade).

But the more I have thought about it, the more I wonder at what point those of us who are able to influence children "should" teach them that there is more to the story then they are taught. Wouldn't doing so completely skew their view and further education or is finding out a lot of the truths early allow them to open their eyes to how things are?

I am curious to hear from any fellow parents, teachers or others that have access to children. What do you think? Are we continuing the agenda of the NWO by letting are children learn the false truths we learned growing up?





posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:36 PM
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reply to post by Roadblockx
 


Whats false about how the pyrmiads were built? There no proof supporting either way. Except that we cant duplicate it.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:39 PM
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The tact I took with my kids is telling the to question everything and try to research it for themselves. They are now 22 and 19 and have thanked me for giving them that perspective.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:40 PM
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What's wrong with expanding on the basics? Especially if you are keeping it age appropriate to understanding and maturity levels? Giving kids more information in a fun, exciting way could spark something in them that would carry forward... You never know what a kids going to run with, why not be an inspiration and promote love of learning?



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:41 PM
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Originally posted by poedxsoldiervet
reply to post by Roadblockx
 


Whats false about how the pyrmiads were built? There no proof supporting either way. Except that we cant duplicate it.


Thanks for the response. I'm not sure it has ever been decided the age of the pyramids, who built them as the dating of the pyramids varies, what the purpose of the pyramids are/were.

So that this doesn't come just about pyramids, I am talking about truths relating to things throughout history that hasn't been accurately portrayed. The founding of the US, how things were included/excluded from the constitution.....etc.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:42 PM
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Even if you present them with wrong perspectives they are nevertheless left with more perspectives and will have better brainstorming and problem-solving abilities.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by xizd1
The tact I took with my kids is telling the to question everything and try to research it for themselves. They are now 22 and 19 and have thanked me for giving them that perspective.


So you were cool with them learning the "popular" view of history? At what age did you tell them to begin researching for themselves and when did you offer up what you "really" thought? I'm very interested.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:43 PM
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reply to post by xizd1
 


I send my kids to a Catholic school, I am in no way a catholic or do I subscribe to that Organized thugery. However, the school system in my city (cincinnati) Are failing and they are failing hard, So I felt I had no choice but to send them there and give them a better chance at success. If you see the numbers here in cincinnati you would agree. I however teach them that you have to question everything that you are being taught, Except Math. Their is never just one answer but many theorys, and will I spend a lot of time on the phone with the Princeapal because they do question everything.( which sometimes is a bit much, I know its my fault) They at the school do not like it.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by poedxsoldiervet
 


Living just a few hours from Cincinatti, I know how bad those schools are. Yikes! I don't blame you at all. If you don't mind me asking, what age are they? I am trying to decide when to let his mind rome without seeming like a "know it all" to his 3rd grade teacher.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:50 PM
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You have to walk a very fine line. Plus, your particular child's ability to retain the knowledge that was taught, while also embracing "alternative theories", is a very personal assessment.

In order for your son to pass class, he has to be able to write what the teacher taught on tests -- not necessarily the "truth" if you will. He will get no points for answering questions based on alternative theories not accepted by the school or state as approved curriculum.

That being said, I normally wait until the particular lesson is over, and the final test given, before I discuss other possible explanations on things. This also applies to history lessons when I find that the school teaches a very limited amount of information and I want my kids to have a deeper understanding of what created the world they now live in -- and are responsible for contributing to down the road.

Once the lesson is over and your son has received his grade, he will be able to absorb what you are teaching him without the fear of confusing it with the accepted curriculum.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:51 PM
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There are always going to be gaps in education and to leave it up to the school system alone, is a disservice to the students. You know your child, expand on his/her level of understanding as it's appropriate to maturity level, you can't really go wrong here if you're teaching your kid(s) to seek knowledge and ask questions.

Good point raised (above) about politics in schools. your son needs to be able to learn what will be on a test and how to pass those tests... this is not necessarily synonymous with being "educated"...

ETA: My niece goes to a Japanese immersion school (poor public school options) but also for the benefit of learning a second language early. Cultural issues have come up though (my family is not Japanese) so they have had to walk a line with school politics. For example: she hates to bow. It's "weird" (her word) to her and makes her uncomfortable though it is part of the culture...





[edit on 1-12-2009 by LadySkadi]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:53 PM
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If I find that they have been presented something that may or may not be correct, I present that there are several other possibilities that people believe, or even the debate amoungst academics.

At their age level.

I do not just do this when I disagree with what they have been taught told. I'll do it with things I agree with too.

However, I leave the truly out there stuff out. I want them to learn to use critical thinking. I don't want their minds open to every bit of trash that floats about. When they run into the wilder ideas later, and they will, I want them to have the ability to confront them and apply logic. That will do them in the best stead over their life, than them knowing the "truth" as I think it.

In the long run, all that would do is set them up to either accept "society" or accept me. That is not the place you want to hold.

[edit on 2009/12/1 by Aeons]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by Roadblockx
 


My oldest is in 4th grade, 1st grade and pre-k.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:08 PM
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reply to post by Roadblockx
 


I will agree with you on that, I had an argument with my kids teacher on the founding of the country and the how it was founded because my kid came home and said it was fact. But you are right there is an effort to dumb down our kids even in private schools.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by LadySkadi
 


Very interesting. I hadn't even thought about the kids that are American going to a different cultured school. Odd being a military brat it didn't come up in my head but glad you mentioned it.

I can see where the bowing thing would be hard to get over. Has she asked about dragons? My limited knowledge of dragons and how they are questioned within that culture will show by me asking that. Forgive the ignorance.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:15 PM
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reply to post by Roadblockx
 

Nope, no dragons yet. However, she has asked about Hell. Ya, good times.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:52 PM
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reply to post by Roadblockx
 


my mom freaked out about weed before i ever even saw it...i was grounded for doing it. outrageous. she even made me go to drug rehab...for marijuana?? LOLZ half baked.

my sisters dad was relaxed about it and asked her if she liked it. she didn't keep doing it never had a problem with it.

to me the better approach is to arm kids with knowledge at appropriate levels and appropriate ages...and understand that EVEN teenagers are going to do what they want to a certain extent and overreacting causes rebellion.

taboo does as well.

lets inform our young adults about the choices they will be making in the very near future. we all know that every generation grows up a little bit faster in sexuality and rebellion.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 02:13 PM
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Originally posted by double_frick
reply to post by Roadblockx
 


lets inform our young adults about the choices they will be making in the very near future. we all know that every generation grows up a little bit faster in sexuality and rebellion.


No they don't. Though apparently this belief remains constant through time. If it were true, by now people would be born as the elderly.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 02:42 PM
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Post removed due to member's request for privacy reasons.

[edit on 12/3/2009 by AshleyD]



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