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787 passes critical test; Dec 22 target for flight

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posted on Nov, 30 2009 @ 09:08 PM
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The static test 787 airframe successfully passed the critical "2-C" test, according to a FlightGlobal blog. A Boeing statement cited in the blog said that engineers deflected the wing to 18 feet with no delamination. This represents a 100% load on the wing. The final data is still being completed, but this should clear them for first flight, and at least one source said they are aiming for a Dec 22 first flight. Engineers plan to stress the wing to 150% sometime in the spring of 2010.




posted on Nov, 30 2009 @ 10:14 PM
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New big bird in an economic downturn.

Is this the new passenger jet competing with Airbus?



posted on Nov, 30 2009 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by whiteraven
 


It`s a medium range, 250-300 seat airliner that`s made mostly of composite materials. The Airbus equivelant would be the A350, which is still in the design phase. Boeing doesn`t plan on making an airliner to compete with the A380 super jumbo.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 07:21 AM
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What type of composite material?

Does it make the structure of the hull, wings, tail lighter yet stronger?

And just for kicks why is this in ATS?

Being a novice my assumption of the above question would be the composite materials origin may come into play? No?



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by whiteraven
 


It`s about 50% carbon fibre reinforced plastic. Prior to this composites made up 10-15% of the airframe.

It`s here just for aviation enthusiasts to discuss and keep up with the program.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 02:58 PM
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Boeing has said it will take about 10 days for a full analysis of the data to be completed. In the meantime Dreamliner 1 is back in the fuel barn. Hopefully we`ll see taxi tests underway within the week.



posted on Dec, 2 2009 @ 10:55 AM
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First flight window opens at 10am on the 14th according to Flight. Meanwhile ZA001 has run the APU and reportedly ran engines today or last night. Plans call for leak checks this week as well as handling and taxi tests, with the possibility of a crew briefing this weekend. At the same time engineers are completing going over the data from the wing test. If all goes well >oeing could have ZA001 and ZA002 in the air by the end of December.



posted on Dec, 2 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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A400 or 787 in the air first?



posted on Dec, 2 2009 @ 01:03 PM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 


I say the Dreamliner by the 18th.



posted on Dec, 2 2009 @ 06:24 PM
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the question is - since the `bus is allready doing fast taxi work - will they push for an early ` decision - rotate`



posted on Dec, 2 2009 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 


From the tone of some of the things I have read they had gotten to at least low speed taxi tests, so they aren`t that far from rotate, once the data crunching is done.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 01:00 AM
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It was originally reported on one of the Flight blogs that first flight would be the 18th. Those same sources reported today that it would be the 15th.



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 02:24 AM
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Looking forward to flying on a 787 someday.

I wonder how long it will be before human flight crews are obsolete on large airliners? 25, 50, 75, years? More?



posted on Dec, 6 2009 @ 09:00 PM
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ZA001 underwent thrust reverser actuator testing Friday, and was undergoing software reversion testing this weekend to make sure there were no bugs.

ZA002 underwent a wash and is back in the hangar to finish buttoning up before flight. ZA002 is supposed to be airborne by the end of the year.



posted on Dec, 7 2009 @ 09:09 PM
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Originally posted by Aircow
...
I wonder how long it will be before human flight crews are obsolete on large airliners? 25, 50, 75, years? More?


Probably never, or not in any foreseeable timeframe. If only for comfort of the passenger as "system supervisor".

Remember, they even put fake door-controlling knobs into some elevators to give the "passengers" the impression that they would be able to influence the machine. And elevators are little tincans moving in a closed system. This psychological problem should be insanely more severe in the case of an aircraft.



posted on Dec, 8 2009 @ 09:41 AM
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Originally posted by whiteraven
What type of composite material?

Does it make the structure of the hull, wings, tail lighter yet stronger?

And just for kicks why is this in ATS?

Being a novice my assumption of the above question would be the composite materials origin may come into play? No?

Question for Zaphod:
Isn't it true that the fuselage is created from single-piece tubes joined end-to-end?

That alone is quite a big change in the way airlines are put together.

[edit on 12/8/2009 by Soylent Green Is People]



posted on Dec, 8 2009 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


It`s really cool to watch the videos of them making the sections. They put the framework for the plug on a giant barbecue spit type device and lay the composite on it in giant sheets as it rotates. But yes, it`s a whole new way to build a plane, which is the big reason it`s two years behind schedule. It`s been a painful learning proces



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