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UK nationals stopped by Iranian navy

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posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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Hey when you people want to get back to discussing facts instead of me let me know.

The fact remains the same though that a state of the art sailing vessel equipped with the most sophisticated navigational equipment available as well as communications devices ended up on the OPPOSITE side of the Persian Gulf from where it was supposed to be sailing.

Now you feel free to keep speculating as to how that very unnatural occurence could have happened.

The topic though is about those six British Spies and their Spy Vessel not me!

Thanks!




posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


What facts point to something completely different?.....do you have some facts no one else is privvy to?

The facts I've seen presented point to a group of young men whose yacht, whilst on the way to compete in a race, had some problems and strayed into Iranian waters.

Please tell me what facts I am missing.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


This isn't about any military craft, it's a yacht with a crew of civilian saliors onboard. Lets hope they are released soon.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:10 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


The topic is not about spies and there spy vessel, its about British yachtsmen being held by Iran, unless you've found that proof yet??



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by Kurokage
reply to post by tristar
 


This isn't about any military craft, it's a yacht with a crew of civilian saliors onboard. Lets hope they are released soon.


It's a specially outfitted spy craft provided through a front company manned by SAS and MI6 Operatives to spy on Iran!

The crew sadly bent it's propeller taking it too close to shore to conduct their spy mission!




posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


You seem to have a very vivid imagination, good for you!! Until some evidence is shown that these men are spies that's just your opinion.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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Facts yes, privy yes, now to move on.

Just several miss leading reports across the net and newspapers should raise a several eyebrows across the ats viewers.

Lets start with what this so called report.




According to reports, it was the second time that Sail Bahrain had strayed into Iranian waters. Earlier in the day, they were stopped and although they had computer equipment seized by Iranian authorities, they were allowed to go free.

Making their way to Dubai, Sail Bahrain then ran into trouble when the propeller on their ten year -old Volvo 60 boat broke. They were arrested shortly after for failing to clear Iranian waters.


So the report does assure us that computers were on board thus making it an established logical assumption that a GPS navigation system was present while sailing. This also indicates that territorial maps of naval vessels either commercial or private have obviously assigned routes. This map would also have the course plotted out to avoid any sea accidents as many warships, commercial vessels and private sailing boats are present in that region. So that rules out the "i made a mistake" or " the system malfunctioned"

Now either i am blind or this so called engine driven propeller is some outboard motor which is clipped to the side or rear of the yacht. Then again perhaps this propeller simply does not exist as the image below seems to show us. Perhaps this propeller is some electric motor which comes out from under the hull and retracts with a dry seal. Perhaps its simply a case of being caught with your fingers in the pie.



edit: www.telegraph.co.uk... l.html

[edit on 1-12-2009 by tristar]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:29 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


Some small sailboats use a simple electric trolling motor that you can purchase at most sporting good stores and clip to the side of the hull and a battery connection.

Some actually have inboard motors but those are usually on larger luxury craft or three masted schooners, you don't rarely see them on one or two masted sloops and skiffs.

There is though no credible reason for an experienced captain and crew to be so far off of course, especially considering they would have known there is an inherent danger in violating sovereign nation's waters.

It would be interesting to know what ship's flag they were flying when caught. If I had to deliberately enter another nation's waters I would hoist that nation's flag in a legally displayed intent to sail those waters. Of course it helps if you have lawfully registered your ship with that nation and obtained a permitt to legally fly their flag while in their waters.

If you haven't raised that nation's flag then you are asking for trouble as you are clearly a foreign flagged vessel violating sovereignty.





[edit on 1/12/09 by ProtoplasmicTraveler]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:36 PM
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Originally posted by ProtoplasmicTraveler
reply to post by tristar
 



If you haven't raised that nation's flag then you are asking for trouble as you are clearly a foreign flagged vessel violating sovereignty.


Indeed, when ever i am invited to sail throughout the med we often don't fly nations flag but the skipper asks for assistance from the port authority or coast guard, this all as they have told me speeds up the process of getting the help you need asap.

But on a side note i did happen to find the specs for the volvo 60 which do show a fold away prop



Specifications

Length: 19.5m
Beam: 5.2m
Draft: 3.7m
Displacement: 14000kg
Upwind Sail Area: 200m
Downwind Sail Area: 417m
Water Ballast: 5000 ltr.
Carbon Fibre Mast and Boom
Twin wheel steering
2 Lewmar coffee grinder winches
Full Brookes and gatehouse instruments
Yanmar diesel engine with folding propeller
18 full length bunks
Typical VO 60 interior layout and galley
Furuno Radar and Weather fax
Futuno SSB Radio
Fully equipped to RORC Safety standards


Just not sure how this works while in a race, i mean, what would prevent the skipper from lowering the prop and gaining those extra 2 or 5 knots. Also if the yacht is in cruising speed and the skipper decides to lower the prop would that result in a broken prop ?



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:39 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


This is something we can both agree on, there should be a serious investigation on the competency of the crew if they did drift a large distance into another contries waters without making some kind of distress call.

[edit on 1-12-2009 by Kurokage]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by tristar
 


Regattas are patrolled by Race Marshalls in power boats, they circle the course keeping an eye on the ships and making sure they find their way to the markers.

The exhaust fumes would be a tell tale sign clearly vissible in the ships wake. A Race Marshall would spot it and disqualify the vessel in short order.

If a sailboat doesn't have some kind of propeller to get in and out of port then it needs a tug boat to get in and out of port, as most ports require low speeds of five knots or less, and most ports have to be accessed going through narrow draw bridges.

Most sail boat enthusiasts prefer sails because it is quieter than an engine and there is no exhaust polution. Deisel fuel permeates the air and the ship when using a motor, and makes a lot of noise.

One of the purest and most natural and relaxing experiences a person can enjoy is being on a nice quiet sail ship listening to the wind in the sails and the waves on the haul without the drone of engines and smelling the fresh sea breezes without the whiff of diesel exhaust.

Sailing rocks, and these sailors certainly were either not competent ones or they were on a spy mission.

The fact that it was Iran and they were so off course makes it highly likely they were on a spy mission.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:48 PM
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....now were entering into damage control and assessment mode



The Kingdom of Bahrain yacht had been heading to join the 580-kilometer (360-mile) Dubai-Muscat Offshore Sailing Race, which was to begin Nov. 26, according to the Web site of its owner Sail Bahrain. The event was to be the boat's first offshore race, the Web site said, adding that the vessel had been fitted with a satellite tracker.


www.comcast.net...



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by Kurokage
reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


This is something we can both agree on, there should be a serious investigation on the competency of the crew if they did drift a large distance into another contries waters without making some kind of distress call.

[edit on 1-12-2009 by Kurokage]


We reflagged most of the Emirate and Saudi vessels decades ago to provide them official legal escort because of tensions after the downing of the Iranian Airbus 300 Commercial Jet by an Aegis Class American Destroyer.

The U.S. Navy and English Navy would have rendered assistance to that boat in a heartbeat if they had called for it. The Persian Gulf is a very busy shipping lane crawling with oil tankers, cargo ships, warships and other private craft.

If they were stranded, and couldn't make sail and called out a S.O.S. or Mayday that they were in danger of violating Iranian Waters because of that they would have gotten U.S. or British assistance within minutes, there are a lot of ellements to this story that don't add up.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by tristar
....now were entering into damage control and assessment mode



The Kingdom of Bahrain yacht had been heading to join the 580-kilometer (360-mile) Dubai-Muscat Offshore Sailing Race, which was to begin Nov. 26, according to the Web site of its owner Sail Bahrain. The event was to be the boat's first offshore race, the Web site said, adding that the vessel had been fitted with a satellite tracker.


www.comcast.net...


That the boat is ten years old and entering it's first race just now considering the timing of political events is and of itself suspicious.

That the owners rented the boat to a crew and captain unfamiliar with the waters to enter the race is even more suspicious.

This appears to me to be a front company run by an intelligence agency who then gave the boat to this particular crew to use as cover for a spy mission along the Iranian Coast.

It's the only thing that makes sense. It would be interesting to see how the boat is insured and if it is even insured to be rented out in it's entirety to independent captains and crews or if it requires it always be sailed by actuall company employees.

It's not too hard to rent a 25 foot power boat with a proper captains license from people in the business of rening them or even a 20-25 sail boat.

A 45-50 foot craft outfitted for racing? That's another story all together, it's not impossible but it would be expensive and they wouldn't just let that kind of investment sail off under anyone's hands, and it appears very much the case that is for good reason based on this story!

Lots and lots of things don't add up here, lots and lots and lots of things in fact.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:09 PM
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Well here's the profiles of the yachtsmen if anybody wants to do some digging.

news.bbc.co.uk...



OLIVER YOUNG, 21

The professional yachtsman from Saltash, Cornwall, has been described as "fanatical" about the sport by his father David.





LUKE PORTER, 21
The professional sailor from Weston-super-Mare is "used to dealing with adversity", according to his father Charles.




DAVID BLOOMER

Mr Bloomer was travelling on a British passport when he was detained by the Iranian navy but has dual British and Irish nationality.

The Bahrain-based radio presenter is in his 60s and from Malahide, an affluent suburban town near the city of Dublin.



OLIVER SMITH, 31

The yacht's skipper, from Southampton, has been described as "very calm" and "sensible" by Hannah White, an up-and-coming yachtswoman.




SAM USHER, 26

The businessman from Scarborough in North Yorkshire owns Wykeham Watersports, a sailing academy on the Dawnay Estate in north east York.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:13 PM
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Indeed it seem's the brains behind the crew is Oliver S.


Mr Smith works as an engineer, having completed a degree in ocean science and marine navigation at the University of Plymouth where he sailed with the men's first team.

Later, he spent six months skippering a 50ft survey yacht and doing delivery work in South America and the Caribbean.


Oh do i see South America and the Caribbean mentioned here, again....sheez wont they ever learn.



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by mr-lizard
 


Mr Lizard, keep looking at Mr. Oliver S. as i have already posted. Start digging, look at which company he was employed with. Don't be surprised...



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:32 PM
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Originally posted by tristar
reply to post by mr-lizard
 


Mr Lizard, keep looking at Mr. Oliver S. as i have already posted. Start digging, look at which company he was employed with. Don't be surprised...


So far i see he used to belong to a team called 'Team Pindar in the Vendee Globe yachting race' and has a degree in Ocean science and marine navigation at the university of Plymouth.

www.teampindar.com...


He then spent six months skippering a 50ft survey yacht and doing delivery work in South America and the Caribbean.



Smith was part of a team that came third in the Racing Division of the ARC (Atlantic Rally for Cruisers).


news.sky.com... 912115481310


Is it the 'delivery work' ??? / surveying ???

Is this what you're hinting at?



[edit on 1-12-2009 by mr-lizard]

[edit on 1-12-2009 by mr-lizard]



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 01:40 PM
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I still can't figure out this spy stuff??

From what i understand, a sports commentator and 3 young sailors were headed out to a boat race. There was no wind so they used their propeller, then it failed....

They drifted 500 yards into Iranian waters and whislt waiting for a tug boat they got picked up by the Iranians....



posted on Dec, 1 2009 @ 02:05 PM
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reply to post by ProtoplasmicTraveler
 


It will not change the fact, that these young men are not spies, until it is proven other wise.

You can sput your crap all you want. You are entitled to do so, as are we entitled to pull you up on it.



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