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on Un-Thanksgiving Day a celebration of the 40th Anniversary of the Occupation of Alcatraz

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posted on Nov, 28 2009 @ 09:38 AM
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Stroy here


SAN FRANCISCO – It began and ended like any other prayerful sunrise ceremony on Alcatraz Island. Crowds bundled in layers of clothing huddled onto ferries. Drummers sang as the boats took turns floating more than 3,500 people across icy waters. Dancers pounded bare feet across the cool floor of the island turned prison turned museum


The paint remains, but few could personally recall Nov. 20, 1969, when 79 Natives landed to reclaim the island under a loose interpretation of a treaty that dictated the return of unused federal land to the Natives from whom it was acquired. And few could remember a time when physical and armed confrontation, and the loss of lives, was almost a required part of the civil rights struggle for Natives.



“I look back and have a lot of happy memories of being here. But I don’t think of it as a legacy; I see it as a beginning. We still have to ask for everything, we still have to beg for everything. I walk the streets and I don’t see more than one indigenous person. We still have to struggle.”

That sentiment was echoed by the honored speakers – Bill Means, IITC founder and U.N. Working Group on Indigenous Populations co-founder, and Clyde Bellecourt, one of the AIM founders and a participant in the occupations of Wounded Knee and a BIA building in 1972.


My post now is just a reminder we red skins are still around and always be... enoy the vid and glimpse into our culture



[edit on 28-11-2009 by DaddyBare]




posted on Nov, 28 2009 @ 12:26 PM
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Just an add too here is a link to the remarkable photos taken along with an interview with Photographer Ilka Hartmann
prisonphotography.wordpress.com...


[edit on 28-11-2009 by DaddyBare]

[edit on 28-11-2009 by DaddyBare]

[edit on 28-11-2009 by DaddyBare]



posted on Nov, 28 2009 @ 02:59 PM
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Good grief, DaddyBare, has it been 40 years! I can remember the headlines and reports.


That was a time when people's groups spoke up with voice, pictures and actions against the voice and actions of govt and corporations. There was no corporate sponsored movement to enlist people to shout out for corporate interests. For 30 years now, peoples groups (note, ACORN for eg and unions) have been diminished and demonized, so as to pacify/control citizens to accept what corporations and the govt leaders they buy want.

An American's study of its own indigenous peoples at the hands of the govt will do much to understand when govts around the world (or US interests around the world) take actions against native groups.

A study of the partitioning of native lands, and the corporate interests in the lands, might be useful in understanding the middle east today. Big Mountain

The invention of satellite imaging for mineral resources (specifically uranium) brought us Wounded Knee 1973.
Dakota

Hey, this summer I read a book by John C. Jackson, Children of the Fur Trade. I thought about my own ancestors from Canada. Many Americans of European descent do not recognize their native heritage.



posted on Nov, 28 2009 @ 03:22 PM
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On another thought, politically today we are so far away from where we were in the 1970's. To many Republicans (etal) today, Richard Nixon appears as a "flaming, bleeding heart liberal" or a "wacko, dope smoking, tree hugging environmentalist terrorist" or a socialist/communist.

Also, this country still has not had a woman president, but native groups have had female equivalents.



posted on Nov, 29 2009 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Cool vid mate, and the Blog looks good as well, i'll be reading it as I try to fall asleep.

I have never heard of the Native retaking of Alcatraz .. has there been any current effort to bring the island back under native control? And is there really an actual claim to it by a specific tribe? Native America is highly generalized, there were many peoples belonging to different nations.

And if you don't mind me asking, which tribe are you?



posted on Nov, 29 2009 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by Rockpuck
reply to post by DaddyBare
 


Cool vid mate, and the Blog looks good as well, i'll be reading it as I try to fall asleep.

I have never heard of the Native retaking of Alcatraz .. has there been any current effort to bring the island back under native control? And is there really an actual claim to it by a specific tribe? Native America is highly generalized, there were many peoples belonging to different nations.

And if you don't mind me asking, which tribe are you?


I don't think any tribe ever really wanted Alcatraz... it was a symbolic place and very visible unlike the black hills and other places where other sit-ins and protests were taking place... This gave the protesters access to the media and a very large American audience... but it is a cold barren rock... I've seen it out there on bay, never been myself, no fresh drinking water and there were warnings about not eating the fish thanks to all the pollution way back then...

Today we have a bright new shining symbol, its address is located at 1514 P St., N.W. in the heart of the nation’s capital Washington DC.
You can read about our firstTribal Embassy Here


PS: I'm a card carrying member of the Jicarilla Apache Nation, grew up just south of Dulce a place of some fame on this site

[edit on 29-11-2009 by DaddyBare]



posted on Nov, 29 2009 @ 04:47 PM
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I can't believe it has been that long... seems like not long back I can remember hearing some of my relatives talking about being a part of all this....

great vid... and a good post....


we of a red heart are always going to be here...



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