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Domes on Mars - Image from Google Mars

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posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 12:47 AM
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So here is a link to the image I found while messing around with Google Mars.

These structures look very much like dome buildings...

I am right am I not?

You can see for yourself if you look at the co-ordinates on the image itself.

*snip*

Mod Note: You Have An Urgent U2U- Click Here.

[edit on December 19th 2009 by greeneyedleo]




posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 12:48 AM
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No.
Craters on Mars. Mars has lots of craters.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 12:49 AM
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Perfect circles?

Oh well!



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 12:50 AM
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These threads show how ignorant and uninformed the general population is when it comes to image analysis.

It's funny and pathetic at the same time.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 12:52 AM
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I like how Phage debunks with just a few words. It's amazing. "Craters. NEXT..."

On another note, yes, they're craters.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 12:54 AM
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Well I wasn't being ignorant - just wanted to know is all.

Sorry.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by majick
 


I absolutely understand. We're here to help, not to berate.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by majick
Perfect circles?

Oh well!


We do not know exactly how these 'circles' formed, but you should note that perfect circles CAN appear in nature and do not have to be necessarily man made, example bubbles, ripples, etc.

[edit on 26-11-2009 by weathernut]



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 01:38 AM
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Why is it whenever the lighting is towards the bottom of the image (from a negative Y-coordinate), it's so often "domes" when they're just craters? You know we do tend to assume light comes from above. In most instances it's an accurate method of extracting information from the retinal images since the sun doesn't tend to shine from beneath our feet. The main problem is that viewing satellite photographs was not in our survival necessities kit in the past.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 01:50 AM
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Originally posted by majick
Well I wasn't being ignorant - just wanted to know is all.

Sorry.

Dont be sorry,the Universe loves a thinker,next time use the elevation as a guide to see if there inees or outees.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 01:59 AM
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lol as soon as I opened the pics I said craters



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 02:05 AM
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Thankies I was absolutely flabagasted as it is the first time I used Google Sky etc and the images baffled me!

I really should trust my instincts rather than what my mind wants to beleive - I have seen sooooooooo many strange things in my life - I have experienced the srangest moments of my life in August 1997 an experience I wish everybody could experience.

I still get breathless and teary eyed now when I think about it.

Ooo I think I will get coffee *breath*



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by majick
I really should trust my instincts rather than what my mind wants to beleive


You've just put yourself leagues a. of many people by realizing this. I applaud your efforts!

Keep it up.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 02:14 AM
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reply to post by EnlightenUp
 


Now, THAT is a good way to answer to questions like the one that has been posed in the OP: it covers many facets of observations on exoplanets, since they're based on orbiting cameras or rovers/landers: our eyes are genetically completely untrained to look at them, and when i say "we" i mean humans, in general. Sometimes, only after some "third party" tells to us that what we see as "positive" is actually "negative", we really realize what we are looking at: it's a matter of perceptions and "to know it"

A good example is the one of Aristarchus, on our Moon:

In this image, it looks like some geometrical shaped dome, (according to some, even a "nuclear reactor" or something like that), too bad the image is in false colors.

I've upped a video time ago, with this exact purpose: notice how until around this frame

it looks like some relief, then it drastically changes its appearance, making visually the point that EnlightenUp has been able to make with no support of images, this is why his post was GREAT.
Hubble Space Telescope Looks at the Moon to Prospect for Resources (Aristarchus Crater - gray)


The Hubble Space Telescope was used to gather high resolution multi spectral data of the moon's Aristarchus Crater in order to investigate the possibility of potential oxygen producing minerals on the surface. Identifying such minerals could aid in planning future sustained human missions on the moon. Initial analysis of the data indicate the likely presence of titanium and iron oxides. Both these minerals could be used as oxygen sources essential for human exploration.
This visualization starts with a view of the moon as seen from Earth using a USGS Apollo derived artist rendered texture (airbrushed). The camera then zooms into the Aristarchus Crater region. Simulated topography derived from Clementine data is used for relief and high resolution HST data is used for the area of interest. After investigating Aristarchus Crater, the camera then moves over to Schroter's Valley for a brief investigation.
This visualization is match rendered with id 3275 so that the color version can be dissolved in or out as needed.


Exposure Time: 2.5 minutes
Filters: F250W (250nm), F344N (344nm), F502N (502nm), F658N (658nm)

Push in and fly-around of HST imagery of Aristarchus Crater
Duration: 40.0 seconds
Available formats:
1280x720 (29.97 fps) MPEG-2 87 MB
svs.gsfc.nasa.gov...

512x288 (29.97 fps) MPEG-1 7 MB
svs.gsfc.nasa.gov...



Animators: Greg Shirah (SVS) (Lead)
Alex Kekesi (SVS)
Greg Bacon (STScI/Aura)
Completed: 2005-10-12
Scientist: James Garvin (NASA/GSFC)
Instruments: HST/ACS Clementine/HIRES
Data set: Lunar Composite Texture
Data Collected: HST: 2005/08/16 - 2005/08/21; Clementine: 1994/02/26-1994/05/05

Credits:
NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio
Additional credit to Zoltan G. Levay (STScI)


There's NO ignorance in asking about something that looks like a dome:
if you want to see something of REALLY ignorant, then here you go.


[edit on 26/11/2009 by internos]



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 02:19 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


Thank you for taking the time to show me that - I am keen now to understand more about why we percieve things in a different light - why we jump 3 million miles a. of ourselves without first taking a few moments to take 3 steps back!



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 02:28 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


Aristarchus is interesting in that I really cannot interpret what I'm seeing at very well even with additional verbal information. The high brightness tends to mask features normally suggested by shadows. It looks basically flat. It doesn't really show until elevation is lowered and relief data becomes visible.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 03:20 AM
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Originally posted by EnlightenUp
reply to post by internos
 


Aristarchus is interesting in that I really cannot interpret what I'm seeing at very well even with additional verbal information. The high brightness tends to mask features normally suggested by shadows. It looks basically flat. It doesn't really show until elevation is lowered and relief data becomes visible.

We have some halfway houses:

we often tend to show what numbers say, actually, it's a NEED.
Try to imagine what would look like the The Apollos Gamma-ray Spectrometer Experiment results with no visual data: a whole bunch of numbers , in the most fortunate case one would just fall asleep while looking at them, scientist or not. In many cases numeric data gets converted to visual data: this is not very different with what happens whenever we look at Aristarchus: let's try to take a look without the known limits that our sight is affected by:

Here, this is what it would look like if your sight would not be limited the limits, or better, spectrum, of our sight:

Enhancing the ratio of ultraviolet to visible light will help estimate how much ilmenite and volcanic glass exist at the Aristarchus crater (Image: NASA/ESA/HST Moon Team)
What we usually see is an extremely limited part of what actually is there:
Some rainbow depicts what we are able to see, but it doesn't mean that what we see is all: there's something above and below:
www.sciencemag.org...

LRO will provide us with some never-seen-before data (including some submetric images, that are just some SMALL part of the project), regardless the fiasco of the plume visible/not visible from Earth: the program is impressive and everything is working good so far
.

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)

Lunar orbiter designed for precise mapping of lunar surface topography, will obtain high-resolution images of the lunar surface and investigate lunar resources.
It also will seek evidence of water ice in the lunar polar region.
lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov...
Mission overview:
lunar.gsfc.nasa.gov...
New NASA Ames Spacecraft to Look for Ice at One of Moon's Poles
www.nasa.gov...
LRO Mission: NASA's First Step Back to the Moon
www.youtube.com...
NASA - Return to the Moon - the Global Exploration Strategy
video.google.it...
_______________________________________
Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS)

This satellite will search for water in the permanent shadow of craters at the lunar South Pole. It is designed to be steered into a crater, where it will analyze material scattered by its own impact.
lcross.arc.nasa.gov...
The LCROSS Mission
spacescience.arc.nasa.gov...
Mission overview:
lcross.arc.nasa.gov...
Crashing into the Moon (ABC NEWS)
blogs.abcnews.com...
The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Mission
www.nasa.gov...
_______________________________________
Human lunar exploration

NASA is aiming to launch the next-generation crew exploration vehicle Orion by 2020. Orion accommodates four crewmembers, and will travel to the surface of the Moon after docking in lunar orbit with a lunar landing craft, which will be launched on the Ares V cargo launch vehicle.
NASA plans to carry out a manned test flight by 2014.
Roadmap:
www.spaceref.com...
Crew Exploration Vehicle Destination for Human Lunar Exploration [.PDF file]
pdf.aiaa.org...
Human Lunar Exploration
Mission Architectures
LPI Lunar Knowledge Requirements Workshop [.PDF file]
www.lpi.usra.edu...
_______________________________________
International Lunar Base

An international project, planned for completion by around 2024. A base is to be built at the lunar polar region, which will accommodate astronauts for six months at a time. The facility will also be used as a base for future missions to Mars.
(Courtesy of NASA)
Download
FINAL REPORT SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE DEVELOPMENT FOR A SELF-SUSTAINING LUNAR COLONY [.PDF file]
www.nss.org...
Download
A ROAD MAP FOR THE ACQUISITION OF THE FIRST LUNAR BASE [.PDF file]
www.ilr.tu-berlin.de...



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 04:25 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


That was an amazing post - I am totally enlightened!

A very interesting few hours spent there!

I now need to sleep and let it all sink in!

Thank you



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