It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Homo Floresiensis is distinct species

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 24 2009 @ 01:37 PM
link   


Researchers from Stony Brook University Medical Center in New York have confirmed that Homo floresiensis is a genuine ancient human species and not a descendant of healthy humans dwarfed by disease. Using statistical analysis on skeletal remains of a well-preserved female specimen, researchers determined the "hobbit" to be a distinct species and not a genetically flawed version of modern humans.


They announced today that Homo Floresiensis is a distinct species. For a long time there was controversy whether they were their own species or a diseased version of modern humans, as theyre only found in one small area of the world.

Anyway, the find isn't as big as Ardipithicus Ramidus, but this is still pretty big and fascinating!

They need to stop finding the answers to all these long-standing questions. I'm studying anthropology right now with the intention of a PhD in biological (physical/evolutionary) anthropology, and by the time I graduate there will be nothing left to find!

Kidding of course, I love this stuff!

www.sciencedaily.com...




posted on Nov, 24 2009 @ 02:14 PM
link   
reply to post by Schmidt1989
 


Just a little supplementary info .

1of5 - Horizon -- Mysteries of The Human Hobbit




==============================================
Can i pick your brain Schmidt1989 ?

------

So modern humans may of encountered them before populating the Australian Continent, i.e moving through the Indonesian archipelago ?

And this small stature was a reaction to evolutionary pressures associated with being confined to an island ?

What ancestor do we share in common with Florensiensis ?



posted on Nov, 25 2009 @ 01:30 AM
link   

Originally posted by UmbraSumus
So modern humans may of encountered them before populating the Australian Continent, i.e moving through the Indonesian archipelago?

It's possible, but we can't be sure of this. The floresiensis fossils discovered so far are no more than 38,000 years old. Human remains more than 10,000 years older have been found in Australia. This is why some people believe floresiensis is simply a degenerate form of Sapiens, originally modern human beings who fell by the wayside during the long march of mankind.


What ancestor do we share in common with Florensiensis?

If the 'degeneracy' theory is correct, then our species is ancestral to theirs.

However, associated archaeological evidence suggests that floriensis may have emerged as early as 95,000 years ago. In this case we would probably share a common ancestor, either Homo erectus or some even more primitive forebear such as the Dmanisi hominids.


And this small stature was a reaction to evolutionary pressures associated with being confined to an island ?

More like the lack of evolutionary pressure: no big predators to pick off the runts. Though limitations on nutrition and other causes probably helped too.



new topics
 
1

log in

join