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"Big Bang" experiment advancing fast

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posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 03:17 AM
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"Big Bang" experiment advancing fast


www.reuters.com

GENEVA (Reuters) - After a year's delay, scientists at the world's biggest accelerator have restarted an experiment to recreate "Big Bang" conditions that had sparked suggestions the earth would be sucked in by millions of black holes
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 03:17 AM
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Moving right along now with the particle accelerator. The article states that they have now been able to circulate particle beams in both directions successfully, and expect before Christmas to be able to accelerate particles at the highest energy level ever, ready to crash the particles together in January. Guess all those scientists who said that the future colider was stopping it from happening were wrong!

I just wish I could hear the correct answer to a simple question about this: if the big bang theory is correct, and it all started with a tiny particle, and now we are recreating that act, how does that not start another 'big bang'?

www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 03:35 AM
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Scientists worldwide praise restart of Large Hadron Collider


www.dallasnews.com...

www.upi.com...



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 09:31 AM
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Oh well, atleast we get to have one last Christmas


Skitz



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by space cadet
 



if the big bang theory is correct, and it all started with a tiny particle, and now we are recreating that act, how does that not start another 'big bang'?


Good question, but really all we are doing is mimicking on a small, small scale the conditions and energy at the time. Not to mention that space already exists, as opposed to the time of the Big Bang, space itself was being made (well 3 dimensional space anyways). All we will be able to see is if the the very scaled down energy ratio is enough (after calculations) to give credence to the theory. Hope that helped....



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by space cadet




I just wish I could hear the correct answer to a simple question about this: if the big bang theory is correct, and it all started with a tiny particle, and now we are recreating that act, how does that not start another 'big bang'?




That is more than a good question, it is a brilliant question. If space and particle size are relative, and time as well, and we know so little of what constitutes the fabric of existence and from where the fields of energies come from that compose sub atomic particles, then it is not only possible to create another universe, one which might only exist for a nano second in our world, but trillions of years in its own world, but it could possibly leak into our world and damage it by expanding here. And it could do so at the speed of light.

What a very cool sci-fi story this would make. Sadly, we are living it.



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 10:23 AM
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reply to post by Nyhee
 


There isn't enough energy being released to form another universe, that type of energy would need to be at or likely well past the Planck Energy for that to happen.



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by jkrog08
reply to post by space cadet
 



if the big bang theory is correct, and it all started with a tiny particle, and now we are recreating that act, how does that not start another 'big bang'?


Good question, but really all we are doing is mimicking on a small, small scale the conditions and energy at the time. Not to mention that space already exists, as opposed to the time of the Big Bang, space itself was being made (well 3 dimensional space anyways). All we will be able to see is if the the very scaled down energy ratio is enough (after calculations) to give credence to the theory. Hope that helped....

so they cpould have little tiny earth in there?



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by jkrog08
reply to post by Nyhee
 


There isn't enough energy being released to form another universe, that type of energy would need to be at or likely well past the Planck Energy for that to happen.


Of course this is dependent upon the Big Bang's current explanation being accurate. A very good web site about the big bang in technical and less technical terms, cut rather briskly can be found here:

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...

As I read over your article you posted, and then found this one, I believe that it only adds more to the possibility that we are doing something very very bad here on Earth. Also, I am saying, which I wish I had said more clearly, that these things are relative in size and energy. What it took to make our universe, may not be necessary to make the next one. Or am I as full of crap as I think I am. lol



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 11:24 AM
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Anyone here who thinks that they know what will or will not happen is foolish.

At the same rate, anyone here who fears the unknown, especially when these "scientists" whose mission is to supposedly gain more knowledge do so knowing that there may even be the tiniest iota of a chance that they could hurt us - real bad - is justified.

But, I do have to say that I myself am not worried because I highly doubt that whatever these scientists are saying they are looking for is of any concern. The universe was created from without. Therefore, if their idea is to discern the state of the universe near its beginning, they are going to continue to get "erroneous" results and they are going to continue to say that they are being sabotaged by mirai-no-bird.

For those in need of a lesson in japanese, that means "Future's bird."



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 11:02 PM
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Thanks for all your responses, and it does make sense that if space itself did not exsist at the time of the big bang then the same thing cannot happen again, however, how are we sure of what WILL happen? I mean, a tiny earth doesn't sound too intimidating to me, black holes scare me but the scientists all agree that will not happen, but how do they know, for sure, what will or will not happen while performing an experiment for the very first time of such magnitude?????

[edit on 22-11-2009 by space cadet]



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 12:02 AM
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I'm looking forward to how this unfolds



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 01:12 AM
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Originally posted by space cadet
I just wish I could hear the correct answer to a simple question about this: if the big bang theory is correct, and it all started with a tiny particle, and
now we are recreating that act, how does that not start another 'big bang'?

Thanks for all your responses, and it does make sense that if space itself did not exsist at the time of the big bang then the same thing cannot happen again, however, how are we sure of what WILL happen? I mean, a tiny earth doesn't sound too intimidating to me, black holes scare me but the scientists all agree that will not happen, but how do they know, for sure, what will or will not happen while performing an experiment for the very first time of such magnitude?????




www.reuters.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

They are not really creating a Big Bang, but are trying to create the particules that were present in the first moment after the Bang occurred.
This is sometime that still take place, but it is not observable, this is why they have gone to all the trouble to set up the this experment, so they can observe and record what is taking place.

The other thing you spoke of it appears space did exist, but it was condensed space, and the nothing wasn't there, once you get past the time thing it would seem there has been mutiple occurances of Bangs.

The Black Holes that could do something are massive, these Black Holes would not have the Mass to substain itself.
Things would go chaotic for a split second and in seeking order, order would return.
Large Black Holes are in effect very large gravity wells, on a Atomic or sub-Atomic level it would seem there would not be enough, matter to matter.
And not I don't believe Hawking's Ray exist.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 01:36 AM
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They are NOT recreating the Big Bang but rather a trhe conditions a couple of miliseconds after the Big Bang. They are trying to find the "Higgs boson"
en.wikipedia.org...

which will explain the origins of mass in the universe.



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