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Can the US Postal Service be Saved?

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posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 06:59 PM
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Can the US Postal Service be Saved?


www.cbsnews.com

The quasi-government agency announced this week that it lost $3.8 billion in the most recent fiscal year, which ended September 30th. It also delivered less mail - 26 billion fewer pieces less, a nearly 13 percent drop from the previous year. The bad news follows losses totaling $7.8 billion in 2007 and 2008.

The Postal Service, as it is quick to point out, is legally prohibited from taking tax dollars. But in order to stay afloat, the agency has been actively borrowing from the U.S. Treasur
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 06:59 PM
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Now we are going to bail out the Post Office. First banks. Next autos. Under discussion - newspapers and now the post office.

Here the government is talking about delivering you your healthcare when they can't figure out how to deliver a post card in a cost effective. I know that some will reply with the retort that the Post Office is not really the government. Give me a break.

Simply solution. Deliver mail Mon, Wed and Fri. Why do you need mail everyday? What is so critical that it can't wait? How many of us check their box every other day or so?

This is not a difficult problem to solve. We won't solve it so we're going to toss them a few $billion and not request any structural reforms which means in three years they'll be back for a few more $billion.



www.cbsnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:10 PM
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What is the internet for if not for receiving electronic mail?

UPS for packages, internet for everything else.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:12 PM
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The postal service has real competition.

Fed Ex, DHL, UPS, Email.

It was only a matter of time before it started to make the drop noticeable. This means the postal service will have to contract in size in order to stay in the black. No more overweight over paid slow moving people getting a free ride on Dear Santa letters.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:13 PM
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You can bet your bottom dollar that the USPS is the next target.

They will be bailed out.... the question ... the real question is, who will pay for it?

I'll give you a hint. You are reading this right now.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:15 PM
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reply to post by Reddupo
 



UPS for packages, internet for everything else.

I hope it doesn't come to that! Sometimes, especially when you're far away from home, like me, there is nothing quite as edifying as when you receive a hand written letter from someone. It's just way more personal than an email, in my opinion at least.

The postal service is good for getting parts of "life events" (birth announcements, baby pictures to grandma, etc.) to others. Could you imagine getting a wedding invitation via a mass email? Oh man, how cheesy would that be?
Though, before my wedding, I probably would've been happy doing that instead of making all those invitations.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by octotom
 


Could you imagine a world where not having internet access meant you couldn't communicate with a personal handwritten note?

Something just doesn't feel right about that.

Of course, this as about money right?



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 



Could you imagine a world where not having internet access meant you couldn't communicate with a personal handwritten note?

I'm not following. How does not having Internet equate to not being able to write a handwritten note? To me, that makes no sense. People wrote letters before the advent of computers, no?



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 07:33 PM
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Many people might not be aware, but the USPS went independent in the 80's. They remained a quasi-governmental entitity, however had to provide their own wherewithall, including the everpresent compliance with hazmat regulation.

The USPS set out to mitigate/remove their buildings' (both leased and owned) hazardous materials, and they did it before they were required to by law. It was a sound business decision, as well as a sort of nod to the Postal Union.

They set out with an aggressive program of sampling, idenfication, monitoring and mitigation. Yes, I know I sound like a mindless desciple.

These steps were important in regard to employees' safety, and they cost a bundle. The Postal Services discovered that some of their bulk mail centers were errected on or near previously identified hazmat and RCRA sites. The mitigation of groundwater, contaminated soils and UST (underground storage tanks) alone cost the USPS in the Western Region of the United States (from Texas west, including Alaska and Hawaii) billions of dollars.

What's my point? There are various vendors and services that might go under without the cheapest way to bill YOU, the customer, without the Postal Service. These are entities that relate to the U.S.'s infrastructure -- phone, internet, fuel, power. Yes, many of us think of these services as being crooked and overcharging, but the fact remains that for the status quo of living, they are required.

The Postal Service has had stern competition in the past few years. This is what I know: The USPS employs more than a million people, however less than, say, Walmart. The USPS provides a service. They are on the cusp, IMO of being antiquated, however if a corporation were to be bailed out, I'd rather it be something somewhat vital, like a utility or important services, than a company that scoops up the bailout money and THEN goes bankrupt ANYway.

I think support of the employed is important in these charged times.

Due to previous threads and ideas that I've read here, I fell compelled to tell you that I am not a government employee. I am not a USPS employee, I am not a gubmint shill (whatever THAT is), I am not a paid disinfo agent, nor a free one. I was once on contract to the USPS and I learned a lot about them -- from the inside, from the contracting officer's desk. I think they care about their employees. I know that's not a popular view.

edit because I can't believe I typed "RECRA", instead of RCRA. Nevermind that's how we said it.


[edit on 21/11/09 by argentus]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 08:04 PM
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reply to post by octotom
 


I was referring to the notion that the USPS as a letter carrier service should be replaced by strictly internet usage. It is I who misunderstood.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
reply to post by octotom
 


I was referring to the notion that the USPS as a letter carrier service should be replaced by strictly internet usage. It is I who misunderstood.


Not possible at this time. There are many people who do not have the internet. Either they don't want it, or can't afford it. Either way mail should still be able to get to them.

I still prefer my utility bills to come to me through regular mail. I would more than likely loose them through all the other e-mail I receive. Yes, I have mail going to different folders. Also, physical mail in your hand is a real reminder you need to pay it.

Then what about the expense many local utility companies would have to put out to convert everything over to electronic. For example I have a water bill, sewage bill, and water pollution bill. The only company out of the three that even has a web existence is the water company.

I would hate to see the USPS gone, and it's competition in serious trouble if the economy gets a lot worse in the future. To top it off, the internet on serious decline, because more and more people can't afford it.

Which would be more expensive? For the government to find a way to save the USPS now, or to have to rebuild the organization and have to buy all the buildings and transportation back further down the road if needed?

On the other hand if the USPS disbanded, the price of my stamp collection would probablly go up considerably.



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 12:15 AM
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Here is an interesting site on the USPS.
USPS Performance

Didn't know they employed so many people.

Further proves that they will be saved if about to fall IMO.

IMO, a company so big should be able to find many ways to reduce costs though...



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 01:29 AM
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Good riddance. They are actively trimming the work force yet keeping unnecessary managerial positions. The place has been eating itself from the inside out due to reckless spending and mistreatment of its employees. There is a solution that is right in their face but the self absorbed decision makers would rather the whole system implode than admit they're the real problem.

Disgruntled ex-Postal worker



posted on Nov, 22 2009 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
reply to post by octotom
 


Could you imagine a world where not having internet access meant you couldn't communicate with a personal handwritten note?

Something just doesn't feel right about that.

Of course, this as about money right?

We are at a point where the internet is much more reliable than snail mail. Cheaper and more reliable.

You don't need a guy driving around in a jeep mailbox to mailbox for hours everyday.



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