It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Mysterious Tunnel beneath the Tomb of Seti I

page: 1
7

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 09:47 AM
link   
I caught this on NatGeo last night and found it to be very interesting. Hawass (I know I know) takes a camera crew deep into a tunnel that's been discovered underneath the Tomb of Seti I (19th Dynasty) that extends well over 400 feet deep... Actually they haven't gotten to the end of it yet and have no idea what may lie at the bottom...

That's a depth of more than the Great Pyramid is tall....

Check out the clip-- looks very dangerous- haven't they ever heard of hard-hats?? It airs again on Sunday at 1pm.. Def worth a watch..

channel.nationalgeographic.com...-Videos/07163_00




posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 10:45 AM
link   
There's still so much to be uncovered in Egypt. Personally, I think that the best stuff is yet to come. If there is anything cool down there, you can be sure that we wont ever know about it.. especially given the folklore of SETI being an alien.

IRM



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 10:55 AM
link   

Originally posted by PhotonEffect
I caught this on NatGeo last night and found it to be very interesting. Hawass (I know I know) takes a camera crew deep into a tunnel that's been discovered underneath the Tomb of Seti I (19th Dynasty) that extends well over 400 feet deep... Actually they haven't gotten to the end of it yet and have no idea what may lie at the bottom...

That's a depth of more than the Great Pyramid is tall....


You know, its been a very long time since I watched something about Egypt, thanks now you've gotten me interested again. Sorry to all those documentary about Sakhalia, your bears and nature will have to wait.


Check out the clip-- looks very dangerous- haven't they ever heard of hard-hats?? It airs again on Sunday at 1pm.. Def worth a watch..


If you can't take a head wound from a falling rock, there's something wrong with you. Hahaha, Worker's Compensation would be mighty angry at how they act.

S&F



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 11:16 AM
link   
If it has anything to do with Hawass, then I wouldn't get your hopes up too high. He never reveals anything of interest really.

Why show us a 400-foot deep well...go explore it first, then tell us what you find Hawass...reminds me of Geraldo opening Al Capone's vault...excitement...then crickets.

Certainly the sands of Egypt have much to be discovered...so here's to getting someone who shares the excitement of a discovery rather than an interest in suppressing it.

Just my 2-cents

S&F for you...it's not your fault that Hawass name is attached to the story.


[edit on 21-11-2009 by Aggie Man]



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 11:53 AM
link   
reply to post by Aggie Man
 


AggieMan-
Not hatin' on you just for your information, Kris Kristofferson wrote "Me and Bobby McGee". Janice just sang it. Being a Texas boy you should know this as Kris was from Brownsville. lol



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 12:03 PM
link   

Originally posted by xizd1
reply to post by Aggie Man
 


AggieMan-
Not hatin' on you just for your information, Kris Kristofferson wrote "Me and Bobby McGee". Janice just sang it. Being a Texas boy you should know this as Kris was from Brownsville. lol



I feel it when Janice sings it though...that's the difference.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 05:49 PM
link   
Pretty interesting, i can't imagine what they would find at the end of it, possibly another entrance to the underground cave complex?

If it's anything that is in some way odd to contemporary history then i doubt Hawass will let it free that it easily though.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 06:20 PM
link   
This has been Hawass' personal pet project for almost 3 years and counting now...and understandably it is important not just to him but to Egyptology in general. The reason being is that KV17 (Tomb of Seti I) is not only the deepest, and longest Tomb in Egypt, but it was the most decorated. Not a single section of this Tomb is unadorned with knowledge or art.

This tunnel was not discovered by Hawass but by Sheikh Ali Abdel-Rassoul, the last descendant of famous Abdel-Rassoul "Tomb Robbers of Thebes", over 30 years ago. Before Sheikh Ali Abdel-Rassoul died, he showed Hawass the tunnel.

Unfortunately, this tunnel in KV17 leading deep into the cliffs was irreparably damaged when Jean-François Champollion, translator of the Rosetta Stone, physically removed two large wall sections with mirror-image scenes during his 1828-29 expedition. This tunnel in KV17 has suffered even greater damage from American and English Archeological digs during the 1950s, as well as the illegal excavations made by Sheikh Ali Abdel-Rassoul.

As most Pharaohs were buried in a separate, often deeper, chamber apart (and either below and parallel to) from the main burial chamber to protect them from Tomb Robbers, this very well could mean that the actual burial chamber of Seti I is still awaiting discovery, and that the damaged mummy we have believed to be Seti I is actually a "decoy".

I'm not quite sure why ATSers are loathe to speak of Hawass. He is an amazing Archaeologist and Egyptologist. I suppose it may be his disdain and dismissal of pseudo-Egyptology such as is commonly perpetuated by the fantastical likes of Cayce, Hancock, Bauval, Sitchin, in addition to every New Age author that has ever been. My personal beef with Hawass is Anti-British/American attitude. I understand that his primary goal in doing such is the preservation of Ancient Egyptian sites for all people, but the restrictions he has placed on British/American Archaeologists wishing to conduct field study in Egypt has been more than unreasonable, favoring the German and the French over the British and Americans. However, despite that grudge towards the policy he has had the Egyptian government enact, I respect his work. There is no shame in referencing Hawass or his works.



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 09:50 PM
link   
reply to post by fraterormus
 


I can't say that I'm a big fan of Hawass, but I'll admit he has one of the coolest jobs on the planet.

I'm American and don't appreciate his lack of impartiality towards our archaeologists. But, it's more that any and all discoveries having to do with Ancient Egypt must run through his filter for it to be the official and correct explanation. If it goes against his (and therefore the orthodox) views it tends to be considered incorrect, pseudo, fringe, or what have you...

Regardless, I hope they're able to reach the end of that tunnel and that there may be something quite profound at the bottom...



posted on Nov, 23 2009 @ 10:14 PM
link   
The only reason imo to have such a deep tunnel would be to hide something of great value. What could it be? It has to be more important than the everyday royal tomb objects. Perhaps it's the power supply SETI is rumored to have used. If it is and Hawass finds it I doubt he will let it be known.



posted on Nov, 24 2009 @ 10:18 AM
link   
There is more that is amazing about Seti the First. He still might be around. In the book "The Search for OMM SETY" by Jonathan Cott, it appears that Seti (spelled Sety in the book) is currently manifesting as a spirit. The cover reads: "Dorothy Louise Eady...began spending her days in the Egyptology wing of the British Museum--rooms filled with relics whose strange familiarity and attraction convinced her that Egypt was where she belonged. Dorothy recalled that in an earlier life, as a fourteen-year-old orphan named Bentreshyt, she had served in the temple at Abydos and fallen tragically in love with Pharaoh Sety the First.
She apparently remembered her past life, studied the Egyptian hieroglyphics and learned them on her own (even contributing to their rediscovery and translation), moved to and settled in Egypt and continued to encounter the disembodied spirit of Seti which included lovemaking. Nothing about a tunnel in the book, but Seti was definitely an an amazing and mysterious character. I would not put it past him to have left something truly fascinating there.



posted on Nov, 26 2009 @ 02:26 AM
link   

Originally posted by InfaRedMan
There's still so much to be uncovered in Egypt. Personally, I think that the best stuff is yet to come. If there is anything cool down there, you can be sure that we wont ever know about it.. especially given the folklore of SETI being an alien.

IRM


Off topics but can I ask you why you didn't add Billy meier in your signature?



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 02:12 PM
link   
Sorry for the bump of such an old thread, but ive been wonderin about this subject for a while.
I remember readin that in 2010/11? they quit diggin cause it seemed like the tunnel stopped abruptly, as if it was never finished, but after goin that far deep underground it doesnt seem logical to me to simply quit, both for the archeologists team, but mostly for the original builders as if i recall correctly they reached about 150 meters below the surface. Quite a task!
So, is there anyone doin some research on site, or actually, due to the actual fragile political situation, has anyone done any research prior to all hell breakin loose?

Thanx in advance for any replies.



posted on Aug, 1 2013 @ 05:22 PM
link   
reply to post by bon3z
 


Hey- thanks for the bump and resurrection of this old thread.


I'd forgotten about this one.

Here's the latest that I could dig up (no pun intended)
news.discovery.com...


The 570-foot-long tunnel for Seti I was left unfinished and may have been designed to house a secret tomb.

THE GIST:
- It took archaeologists three years to excavate the 570-foot tunnel.

- The tunnel was decorated with preliminary sketches and had instructions inscribed for workers.

After a 23-year effort, archaeologists have uncovered a secret tunnel in the tomb of Seti I, who ruled Egypt more than 3,000 years ago, the culture minister said on Wednesday.

The Egyptian team, headed by antiquities chief Zahi Hawass, had been "searching for this tunnel for over twenty years in the West Bank necropolis" of Luxor, south Egypt, Faruq Hosni said in a statement.

Hawass said it then took three years to excavate the 174 meter-long (570-foot) tunnel, in which archaeologists found shards of pottery and fragments of statuettes.

The tunnel was painted with preliminary sketches for decorations and instructions from the architect to workmen carving out the tunnel, Hawass said.


There are some pics here
news.nationalgeographic.com...

That may be the original link I posted that is now dead

Cheers



posted on Aug, 2 2013 @ 02:26 PM
link   
Yeah, thats all the info i managed to find too, and link doesnt seem to work.
Quite a shame really, i wasnt expecting ''the hall of records'' but neither a dead end tunnel. Weird.



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 09:14 AM
link   


After more than 40 years archaeologists have finally reached the end of the mysterious tunnel in the tomb of Seti I. Yet hopes it would lead to the pharaoh's secret burial site have been crushed, after the seemingly unfinished tunnel suddenly stopped after a back-breaking 174m....

Dr Hawass believes Seti I was trying to construct a secret 'tomb within a tomb' at the end of the tunnel when he died, and that Ramesses II halted proceedings to bury his father. Now Dr Hawass has turned his attentions to the tomb of Ramesses II, believing he made his own secret burial within his tomb in the Valley. An Egyptian mission is currently working in Ramesses II's tomb to preserve its wall paintings and search for another tunnel.


Source



posted on Aug, 3 2013 @ 02:36 PM
link   
reply to post by Chazam
 


You can be sure that this investigation in Rameses' tomb has been shelved at present.

Harte




top topics



 
7

log in

join